• On the basis of the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS), a detailed systematic investigation of the O Vz stars is presented. The currently used spectral classification criteria are rediscussed, and the Vz phenomenon is recalibrated through the addition of a quantitative criterion based on the equivalent widths of the He I 4471, He II 4542, and He II 4686 spectral lines. The GOSSS O Vz and O V populations resulting from the newly adopted spectral classification criteria are comparatively analyzed. The locations of the O Vz stars are probed, showing a concentration of the most extreme cases toward the youngest star forming regions. The occurrence of the Vz spectral peculiarity in a solar-metallicity environment, as predicted by the fastwind code, is also investigated, confirming the importance of taking into account several processes for the correct interpretation of the phenomenon.
  • Two new ON supergiant spectra (bringing the total known to seven) and one new ONn giant (total of this class now eight) are presented; they have been discovered by the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey. These rare objects represent extremes in the mixing of CNO-cycled material to the surfaces of evolved, late-O stars, by uncertain mechanisms in the first category but likely by rotation in the second. The two supergiants are at the hot edge of the class, which is a selection effect from the behavior of defining N III and C III absorption blends, related to the tendency toward emission (Of effect) in the former. An additional N/C criterion first proposed by Bisiacchi et al. is discussed as a means to alleviate that effect, and it is relevant to the two new objects. The entire ON supergiant class is discussed; they display a fascinating diversity of detail undoubtedly related to the complexities of their extended atmospheres and winds that are sensitive to small differences in physical parameters, as well as to binary effects in some cases. Serendipitously, we have found significant variability in the spectrum of a little-known hypergiant with normal N, C spectra selected as a comparison for the anomalous objects. In contrast to the supergiants, the ONn spectra are virtual (nitrogen)-carbon copies of one another except for the degrees of line broadening, which emphasizes their probable unique origin and hence amenability to definitive astrophysical interpretation.
  • Extremely broad emission wings at H$\beta$ and H$\alpha$ have been found in VFTS data for five very luminous BA supergiants in or near 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The profiles of both lines are extremely asymmetrical, which we have found to be caused by very broad diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the longward wing of H$\beta$ and the shortward wing of H$\alpha$. These DIBs are well known to interstellar but not to many stellar specialists, so that the asymmetries may be mistaken for intrinsic features. The broad emission wings are generally ascribed to electron scattering, although we note difficulties for that interpretation in some objects. Such profiles are known in some Galactic hyper/supergiants and are also seen in both active and quiescent Luminous Blue Variables. No prior or current LBV activity is known in these 30 Dor stars, although a generic relationship to LBVs is not excluded; subject to further observational and theoretical investigation, it is possible that these very luminous supergiants are approaching the LBV stage for the first time. Their locations in the HRD and presumed evolutionary tracks are consistent with that possibility. The available evidence for spectroscopic variations of these objects is reviewed, while recent photometric monitoring does not reveal variability. A search for circumstellar nebulae has been conducted, with an indeterminate result for one of them.
  • Optical spectroscopic monitoring has been conducted of two O stars in the Small and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud, the spectral characteristics of which place them in the Of?p category, which has been established in the Galaxy to consist of oblique magnetic rotators. All of these Magellanic stars show systematic spectral variations typical of the Of?p class, further strengthening their magnetic candidacy to the point of virtual certainty. The spectral variations are related to photometric variations derived from OGLE data by Naze et al. (2015) in a parallel study, which yields rotational periods for two of them. Now circular spectropolarimetry is required to measure their fields, and ultraviolet spectroscopy to further characterize their low-metallicity, magnetically confined winds, in support of hydrodynamical analyses.
  • We present results of a high angular resolution survey of massive OB stars in the Cygnus OB2 association that we conducted with the Fine Guidance Sensor 1R (FGS1r) on the Hubble Space Telescope. FGS1r is able to resolve binary systems with a magnitude difference delta-V < 4 down to separations as small as 0.01 arcsec. The sample includes 58 of the brighter members of Cyg OB2, one of the closest examples of an environment containing a large number of very young and massive stars. We resolved binary companions for 12 targets and confirmed the triple nature of one other target, and we offer evidence of marginally resolved companions for two additional stars. We confirm the binary nature of 11 of these systems from complementary adaptive optics imaging observations. The overall binary frequency in our study is 22% to 26% corresponding to orbital periods ranging from 20 - 20,000 years. When combined with the known short-period spectroscopic binaries, the results supports the hypothesis that the binary fraction among massive stars is > 60%. One of the new discoveries is a companion to the hypergiant star MT 304 = Cyg OB2-12, and future measurements of orbital motion should provide mass estimates for this very luminous star.
  • The most luminous Spitzer point sources in the 30 Doradus triggered second generation are investigated coherently in the 3-8 micron region. Remarkable diversity and complexity in their natures are revealed. Some are also among the brightest JHK sources, while others are not. Several of them are multiple when examined at higher angular resolutions with HST NICMOS and WFPC2/WFC3 as available, or with VISTA/VMC otherwise. One is a dusty compact H II region near the far northwestern edge of the complex, containing a half dozen bright I-band sources. Three others appear closely associated with luminous WN stars and causal connections are suggested. Some are in the heads of dust pillars oriented toward R136, as previously discussed from the NICMOS data. One resides in a compact cluster of much fainter sources, while another appears monolithic at the highest resolutions. Surprisingly, one is the brighter of the two extended "mystery spots" associated with Knot 2 of Walborn et al. Masses are derived from YSO models for unresolved sources and lie in the 10-30 M_{sun} range. Further analysis of the IR sources in this unique region will advance understanding of triggered massive star formation, perhaps in some unexpected and unprecedented ways.
  • We use contemporary evolutionary models for Very Massive Stars (VMS) to assess whether the Eddington limit constrains the upper stellar mass limit. We also consider the interplay between mass and age for the wind properties and spectral morphology of VMS, with reference to the recently modified classification scheme for O2-3.5If*/WN stars. Finally, the death of VMS in the local universe is considered in the context of pair instability supernovae.
  • We describe observations in the nearby universe (<100 Mpc) with a 10-m or larger space-based telescope having imaging and spectral capabilities in the range 912-9000 \AA that would enable advances in the fields of massive stars, young populations, and star-forming galaxies, that are essential for achieving the Cosmic Origins Program objectives i) how are the chemical elements distributed in galaxies and dispersed in the circumgalactic and intergalactic medium; and ii) when did the first stars in the universe form, and how did they influence their environments. We stress the importance of observing hundreds of massive stars and their descendants individually, which will make it possible to separate the many competing factors that influence the observed properties of these systems (mass, composition, convection, mass-loss, rotation rate, binarity, magnetic fields, and cluster mass).
  • We report the discovery of two previously unknown WN3 stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Both are bright (15th magnitude), isolated, and located in regions covered in earlier surveys, although both are relatively weak-lined. We suggest that there may be $\mathcal{O}(10)$ remaining undiscovered WNE stars in the LMC.
  • The spectral and spatial characteristics of two special categories of O stars found in the VFTS dataset are presented. One of them comprises very rapid rotators, including several more extreme than any previously known. These objects are distributed around the peripheries of the main 30 Doradus clusters, suggesting a runaway nature for which their radial velocities already provide preliminary supporting evidence. The other category consists of a large number of Vz stars, previously hypothesized on spectroscopic grounds to be on or very near the ZAMS. Their distribution is the inverse of that of the rapid rotators: the Vz are strongly concentrated to the ionizing clusters, plus a newly recognized band of recent and current star formation to the north, which provides strong circumstantial evidence for their extreme youth.
  • With new data from the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey, we confirm and expand the ONn category of late-O, nitrogen-enriched (N), rapidly rotating (n) giants. In particular, we have discovered two "clones" (HD 102415 and HD 117490) of one of the most rapidly rotating O stars previously known (HD 191423, "Howarth's Star"). We compare the locations of these objects in the theoretical HR Diagram to those of slowly rotating ON dwarfs and supergiants. All ON giants known to date are rapid rotators, whereas no ON dwarf or supergiant is; but all ON stars are small fractions of their respective spectral-type/luminosity-class/rotational subcategories. The ONn giants, displaying both substantial processed material and high rotation at an intermediate evolutionary stage, may provide significant information about the development of those properties. They may have preserved high initial rotational velocities or been spun up by TAMS core contraction; but alternatively and perhaps more likely, they may be products of binary mass transfer. At least some of them are also runaway stars.
  • We have developed lists of likely B3--A0 stars (called "late B" stars) in the young cluster Trumpler 16. The following criteria were used: location within 3' of Eta Car, an appropriate V and B-V combination, and proper motion (where available). Color and magnitude cuts have been made assuming an E(B-V) =0.55 mag +/- 0.1, which is a good approximation close to the center of Trumpler 16. These lists have been cross-correlated with X-ray sources found in the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP). Previous studies have shown that only very rarely (if at all) do late main sequence B stars produce X-rays. We present evidence that the X-ray detected sources are binaries with low-mass companions, since stars less massive than 1.4 Msun are strong X-ray sources at the age of the cluster. Both the median X-ray energies and X-ray luminosities of these sources are in good agreement with values for typical low-mass coronal X-ray sources. We find that 39% of the late B stars based on a list with proper motions have low-mass companions. Similarly, 32% of a sample without proper motions have low-mass companions. We discuss the X-ray detection completeness. These results on low-mass companions of intermediate mass stars are complementary to spectroscopic and interferometric results, and probe new parameter space of low mass companions at all separations. They do not support a steeply rising distribution of mass ratios to low masses for intermediate-mass (5 Msun) primaries, such as would be found by random pairing from the Initial Mass Function.
  • The Chandra Carina Complex contains 200 known O- and B type stars. The Chandra survey detected 68 of the 70 O stars and 61 of 127 known B0-B3 stars. We have assembled a publicly available optical/X-ray database to identify OB stars that depart from the canonical Lx/Lbol relation, or whose average X-ray temperatures exceed 1 keV. Among the single O stars with high kT we identify two candidate magnetically confined wind shock sources: Tr16-22, O8.5 V, and LS 1865, O8.5 V((f)). The O4 III(fc) star HD 93250 exhibits strong, hard, variable X-rays, suggesting it may be a massive binary with a period of >30 days. The visual O2 If* binary HD 93129A shows soft 0.6 keV and hard 1.9 keV emission components, suggesting embedded wind shocks close to the O2 If* Aa primary, and colliding wind shocks between Aa and Ab. Of the 11 known O-type spectroscopic binaries, the long orbital-period systems HD 93343, HD 93403 and QZ Car have higher shock temperatures than short-period systems such as HD 93205 and FO 15. Although the X-rays from most B stars may be produced in the coronae of unseen, low-mass pre-main-sequence companions, a dozen B stars with high Lx cannot be explained by a distribution of unseen companions. One of these, SS73 24 in the Treasure Chest cluster, is a new candidate Herbig Be star.
  • The Great Nebula in Carina provides an exceptional view into the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant HII regions and starburst galaxies. We have mapped the Carina star-forming complex in X-rays, using archival Chandra data and a mosaic of 20 new 60ks pointings using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, as a testbed for understanding recent and ongoing star formation and to probe Carina's regions of bright diffuse X-ray emission. This study has yielded a catalog of properties of >14,000 X-ray point sources; >9800 of them have multiwavelength counterparts. Using Chandra's unsurpassed X-ray spatial resolution, we have separated these point sources from the extensive, spatially-complex diffuse emission that pervades the region; X-ray properties of this diffuse emission suggest that it traces feedback from Carina's massive stars. In this introductory paper, we motivate the survey design, describe the Chandra observations, and present some simple results, providing a foundation for the 15 papers that follow in this Special Issue and that present detailed catalogs, methods, and science results.
  • In this poster we show our preliminary analysis of DIBs (Diffuse Interstellar Bands) and other interstellar absorption lines with the purpose of understanding their origin and their relationship with extinction. We use the biggest Galactic O-star blue-violet spectroscopic sample ever (GOSSS, see contribution by Ma\'iz Apell\'aniz at this meeting). This sample allows a new insight on this topic because of the adequacy of O-star spectra, the sample number (700 and increasing, 400 used here), and their distribution in the MW disk. We confirm the high correlation coefficients between different DIBs and E(B - V), though the detailed behavior of each case shows small differences. We also detect a moderately low correlation coefficient between Ca II {\lambda}3934 (Ca K) and E(B - V) with a peculiar spatial distribution that we ascribe to the relationship between line saturation and velocity profiles for Ca II {\lambda}3934.
  • The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS) is a project that is observing all known Galactic O stars with B < 13 (~2000 objects) in the blue-violet part of the spectrum with R~2500. It also includes two companion surveys (a spectroscopic one at R~1500 and a high resolution imaging one). It is based on v2.0 of the Galactic O star catalog (v1, Ma\'iz Apell\'aniz et al. 2004; v2, Sota et al. 2008). We have completed the first part of the main project. Here we present results on the first 400 objects of the sample.
  • Following a brief exposition of the morphological process, two examples of its application in contemporary astronomy are presented. The first comprises a major digital, blue-violet spectral classification program on Galactic O stars, that has already revealed three special categories or new members thereof: the Ofc class with C III lambda4650 emission comparable to N III lambda4640, the Of?p class of magnetic oblique rotators, and the ONn class of nitrogen-rich rapid rotators. All of these categories portend further understanding of massive stellar atmospheres and evolution. The second example concerns the structure of massive young clusters and nebulae as a function of age on timescales of the order of or less than 10 Myr, which has provided a new insight into the Antennae major-merger starburst.
  • Major stellar-wind emission features in the spectrum of Eta Car have recently decreased by factors of order 2 relative to the continuum. This is unprecedented in the modern observational record. The simplest, but unproven, explanation is a rapid decrease in the wind density.
  • We report the discovery of new Herbig-Haro (HH) jets in the Carina Nebula, and we discuss the protostellar outflow activity of a young OB association. These are the first results of an HST/ACS H-alpha imaging survey of Carina. Adding to the one previously known example (HH666), we detect 21 new HH jets, plus 17 new candidate jets, ranging in length from 0.005 to 3 pc. We derive jet mass-loss rates ranging from 8e-9 to 1e-6 Msun/yr, but a comparison to the distribution of jet mass-loss rates in Orion suggests that we may be missing a large fraction of the jets below 1e-8 Msun/yr. A key qualitative result is that even some of the smallest dark globules with sizes of 0.01pc are active sites of ongoing star formation because we see HH jets emerging from them, and that these offer potential analogs to the cradle of our Solar System because of their proximity to dozens of imminent supernovae that will enrich them with radioactive nuclides like 60Fe. HST images reveal proplyd structures in the core of the Tr14 cluster, only 0.1-0.2 pc from several O-type stars. Many examples of bent jets serve as "wind socks"; strong photoevaporative flows can shape the jets, competing with the direct winds and radiation from massive stars. Finally, even allowing for a large number of jets that may escape detection, we find that HH jets are negligible to the global turbulence of the surrounding region, which is driven by massive star feedback.
  • The Onfp class of rotationally broadened, hot spectra was defined some time ago in the Galaxy, where its membership to date numbers only eight. The principal defining characteristic is a broad, centrally reversed He II $\lambda$4686 emission profile; other emission and absorption lines are also rotationally broadened. Recent surveys in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) have brought the class membership there, including some related spectra, to 28. We present a survey of the spectral morphology and rotational velocities, as a first step toward elucidating the nature of this class. Evolved, rapidly rotating hot stars are not expected theoretically, because the stellar winds should brake the rotation. Luminosity classification of these spectra is not possible, because the principal criterion (He II $\lambda$4686) is peculiar; however, the MCs provide reliable absolute magnitudes, which show that they span the entire range from dwarfs to supergiants. The Onfp line-broadening distribution is distinct and shifted toward larger values from those of normal O dwarfs and supergiants with >99.99% confidence. All cases with multiple observations show line-profile variations, which even remove some objects from the class temporarily. Some of them are spectroscopic binaries; it is possible that the peculiar profiles may have multiple causes among different objects. The origin and future of these stars are intriguing; for instance, they could be stellar mergers and/or gamma-ray-burst progenitors.
  • We present the analysis of high-resolution optical spectroscopic observations of the zero-age main-sequence O star Herschel 36 spanning six years. This star is definitely a multiple system, with at least three components detected in its spectrum. Based on our radial-velocity (RV) study, we propose a picture of a close massive binary and a more distant companion, most probably in wide orbit about each other. The orbital solution for the binary, whose components we identify as O9 V and B0.5 V, is characterized by a period of 1.5415 +/- 0.0006 days. With a spectral type O7.5 V, the third body is the most luminous component of the system and also presents RV variations with a period close to 498 days. Some possible hypotheses to explain the variability are briefly addressed and further observations are suggested.
  • Marked correlations are reported between the ionization of the X-ray line spectra of normal OB stars, as observed by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and their optical spectral types. These correlations include the progressive weakening of the higher ionization relative to the lower ionization X-ray lines with advancing spectral type, and the similarly decreasing intensity ratios of the H-like to He-like lines of the alpha ions. These relationships were not predicted by models, nor have they been clearly evident in astrophysical studies of a few objects; rather, they have emerged from morphological analysis of an adequate (albeit still small) sample, from which known peculiar objects such as magnetic stars and very rapid rotators have been isolated to reveal the normal trends. This process is analogous to that which first demonstrated the strong relationships between the UV wind profiles and the optical spectral types of normal OB stars, which likely bear a physical as well as a historical connection to the present X-ray results. Since the optical spectral types are calibrated in terms of fundamental stellar parameters, it follows that the winds and X-ray spectra are determined by the latter. These observations provide strong guidance for further astrophysical modeling of these phenomena.
  • We present the first high-spatial resolution near-infrared (NIR) imaging of NGC 604, obtained with the NICMOS camera aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These NICMOS broadband images reveal new NIR point sources, clusters, and diffuse structures. We found an excellent spatial correlation between the 8.4 GHz radio continuum and the 2.2mu-m nebular emission. Moreover, massive young stellar object candidates appear aligned with these radio peaks, reinforcing the idea that those areas are star-forming regions. Three different scaled OB associations are recognized in the NICMOS images. The brightest NIR sources in our images have properties that suggest that they are red supergiant stars, of which one of them was previously known. This preliminary analysis of the NICMOS images shows the complexity of the stellar content of the NGC 604 nebula.
  • We present a spectroscopic study of the N159/N160 massive-star forming region south of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud, classifying a total of 189 stars in the field of the complex. Most of them belong to O and early B spectral classes; we have also found some uncommon and very interesting spectra, including members of the Onfp class, a Be P Cygni star, and some possible multiple systems. Using spectral types as broad indicators of evolutionary stages, we considered the evolutionary status of the region as a whole. We infer that massive stars at different evolutionary stages are present throughout the region, favoring the idea of a common time for the origin of recent star formation in the N159/N160 complex as a whole, while sequential star formation at different rates is probably present in several subregions.
  • The paradigmatic Luminous Blue Variable R127 in the Large Magellanic Cloud has been found in the intermediate, peculiar early-B state, and substantially fainter in visual light, signaling the final decline from its major outburst that began between 1978 and 1980. This transformation was detected in 2008 January, but archival data show that it began between early 2005 and early 2007. In fact, significant changes from the maximum, peculiar A-type spectrum, which was maintained from 1986 through 1998, had already begun the following year, coinciding with a steep drop in visual light. We show detailed correspondences between the spectrum and light, in which the decline mimics the rise. Moreover, these trends are not monotonic but are characterized by multiple spikes and dips, which may provide constraints on the unknown outburst mechanism. Intensive photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of R127 should now resume, to follow the decline presumably back to the quiescent Ofpe/WN9 state, in order to fully document the remainder of this unique observational opportunity.