• We present {\lambda}1.3 mm CARMA observations of dust polarization toward 30 star-forming cores and 8 star-forming regions from the TADPOL survey. We show maps of all sources, and compare the ~2.5" resolution TADPOL maps with ~20" resolution polarization maps from single-dish submillimeter telescopes. Here we do not attempt to interpret the detailed B-field morphology of each object. Rather, we use average B-field orientations to derive conclusions in a statistical sense from the ensemble of sources, bearing in mind that these average orientations can be quite uncertain. We discuss three main findings: (1) A subset of the sources have consistent magnetic field (B-field) orientations between large (~20") and small (~2.5") scales. Those same sources also tend to have higher fractional polarizations than the sources with inconsistent large-to-small-scale fields. We interpret this to mean that in at least some cases B-fields play a role in regulating the infall of material all the way down to the ~1000 AU scales of protostellar envelopes. (2) Outflows appear to be randomly aligned with B-fields; although, in sources with low polarization fractions there is a hint that outflows are preferentially perpendicular to small-scale B-fields, which suggests that in these sources the fields have been wrapped up by envelope rotation. (3) Finally, even at ~2.5" resolution we see the so-called "polarization hole" effect, where the fractional polarization drops significantly near the total intensity peak. All data are publicly available in the electronic edition of this article.
  • We estimate the parameters of the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relationship, linking the star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) to the molecular gas surface density (Sigma_mol), in the STING sample of nearby disk galaxies using a hierarchical Bayesian method. This method rigorously treats measurement uncertainties, and provides accurate parameter estimates for both individual galaxies and the entire population. Assuming standard conversion factors to estimate Sigma_SFR and Sigma_mol from the observations, we find that the KS parameters vary between galaxies, indicating that no universal relationship holds for all galaxies. The KS slope of the whole population is 0.76, with the 2sigma range extending from 0.58 to 0.94. These results imply that the molecular gas depletion time is not constant, but varies from galaxy to galaxy, and increases with the molecular gas surface density. Therefore, other galactic properties besides just Sigma_mol affect Sigma_SFR, such as the gas fraction or stellar mass. The non-universality of the KS relationship indicates that a comprehensive theory of star formation must take into account additional physical processes that may vary from galaxy to galaxy.
  • We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kpc and kpc scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ($\Shtwo\gtrsim$20 \msunpc) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, $\nmol\sim0.96\pm0.16$, with a molecular gas depletion time $\tdep\sim2.30\pm1.32$ Gyr. We show that, in the molecular regions of our galaxies there are no clear correlations between \tdep\ and the free-fall and effective Jeans dynamical times throughout the sample. We do not find strong trends in the power-law index of the spatially resolved molecular gas star formation law or the molecular gas depletion time across the range of galactic stellar masses sampled (\mstar $\sim$$10^{9.7}-10^{11.5}$ \msun). There is a trend, however, in global measurements that is particularly marked for low mass galaxies. We suggest this trend is probably due to the low surface brightness CO, and it is likely associated with changes in CO-to-H2 conversion factor.
  • This study explores the effects of different assumptions and systematics on the determination of the local, spatially resolved star formation law. Using four star formation rate (SFR) tracers (H\alpha with azimuthally averaged extinction correction, mid-infrared 24 micron, combined H\alpha and mid-infrared 24 micron, and combined far-ultraviolet and mid-infrared 24 micron), several fitting procedures, and different sampling strategies we probe the relation between SFR and molecular gas at various spatial resolutions and surface densities within the central 6.5 kpc in the disk of NGC4254. We find that in the high surface brightness regions of NGC4254 the form of the molecular gas star formation law is robustly determined and approximately linear and independent of the assumed fraction of diffuse emission and the SFR tracer employed. When the low surface brightness regions are included, the slope of the star formation law depends primarily on the assumed fraction of diffuse emission. In such case, results range from linear when the fraction of diffuse emission in the SFR tracer is ~30% or less (or when diffuse emission is removed in both the star formation and the molecular gas tracer), to super-linear when the diffuse fraction is ~50% and above. We find that the tightness of the correlation between gas and star formation varies with the choice of star formation tracer. The 24 micron SFR tracer by itself shows the tightest correlation with the molecular gas surface density, whereas the H\alpha corrected for extinction using an azimuthally-averaged correction shows the highest dispersion. We find that for R<0.5R_25 the local star formation efficiency is constant and similar to that observed in other large spirals, with a molecular gas depletion time ~2 Gyr.
  • We study a 24\,$\mu$m selected sample of 330 galaxies observed with the Infrared Spectrograph for the 5\,mJy Unbiased Spitzer Extragalactic Survey. We estimate accurate total infrared luminosities by combining mid-IR spectroscopy and mid-to-far infrared photometry, and by utilizing new empirical spectral templates from {\em Spitzer} data. The infrared luminosities of this sample range mostly from 10$^9$L$_\odot$ to $10^{13.5}$L$_\odot$, with 83% in the range 10$^{10}$L$_\odot$$<$L$_{\rm IR}$$<10^{12}$L$_\odot$. The redshifts range from 0.008 to 4.27, with a median of 0.144. The equivalent widths of the 6.2\,$\mu$m aromatic feature have a bimodal distribution. We use the 6.2\,$\mu$m PAH EW to classify our objects as SB-dominated (44%), SB-AGN composite (22%), and AGN-dominated (34%). The high EW objects (SB-dominated) tend to have steeper mid-IR to far-IR spectral slopes and lower L$_{\rm IR}$ and redshifts. The low EW objects (AGN-dominated) tend to have less steep spectral slopes and higher L$_{\rm IR}$ and redshifts. This dichotomy leads to a gross correlation between EW and slope, which does not hold within either group. AGN dominated sources tend to have lower log(L$_{\rm PAH 7.7\mu m}$/L$_{\rm PAH 11.3\mu m}$) ratios than star-forming galaxies, possibly due to preferential destruction of the smaller aromatics by the AGN. The log(L$_{\rm PAH 7.7\mu m}$/L$_{\rm PAH 11.3\mu m}$) ratios for star-forming galaxies are lower in our sample than the ratios measured from the nuclear spectra of nearby normal galaxies, most probably indicating a difference in the ionization state or grain size distribution between the nuclear regions and the entire galaxy. Finally, we provide a calibration relating the monochromatic 5.8, 8, 14 and 24um continuum or Aromatic Feature luminosity to L$_{\rm IR}$ for different types of objects.
  • We present a careful analysis of the point source detection limit of the AKARI All-Sky Survey in the WIDE-S 90 $\mu$m band near the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP). Timeline Analysis is used to detect IRAS sources and then a conversion factor is derived to transform the peak timeline signal to the interpolated 90 $\mu$m flux of a source. Combined with a robust noise measurement, the point source flux detection limit at S/N $>5$ for a single detector row is $1.1\pm0.1$ Jy which corresponds to a point source detection limit of the survey of $\sim$0.4 Jy. Wavelet transform offers a multiscale representation of the Time Series Data (TSD). We calculate the continuous wavelet transform of the TSD and then search for significant wavelet coefficients considered as potential source detections. To discriminate real sources from spurious or moving objects, only sources with confirmation are selected. In our multiscale analysis, IRAS sources selected above $4\sigma$ can be identified as the only real sources at the Point Source Scales. We also investigate the correlation between the non-IRAS sources detected in Timeline Analysis and cirrus emission using wavelet transform and contour plots of wavelet power spectrum. It is shown that the non-IRAS sources are most likely to be caused by excessive noise over a large range of spatial scales rather than real extended structures such as cirrus clouds.
  • Abridged: We present analysis of Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the three low surface brightness (LSB) optical giant galaxies Malin 1, UGC 6614 and UGC 9024. Mid- and far-infrared morphology, spectral energy distributions, and integrated colors are used to derive the dust mass, dust-to-gas mass ratio, total infrared luminosity, and star formation rate (SFR). The 8 micron images indicate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules are present in the central regions of all three metal-poor LSB galaxies. The diffuse optical disks of Malin 1 and UGC 9024 remain undetected at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The dustiest of the three LSB galaxies, UGC 6614, has infrared morphology that varies significantly with wavelength. The 8 and 24 micron emission is co-spatial with H\alpha emission previously observed in the outer ring of UGC 6614. The estimated dust-to-gas ratios, from less than 10^{-3} to 10^{-2}, support previous indications that the LSB galaxies are relatively dust poor compared to the HSB galaxies. The total infrared luminosities are approximately 1/3 to 1/2 the blue band luminosities, suggesting that old stellar populations are the primary source of dust heating in these LSB objects. The SFR estimated from the infrared data ranges ~0.01-0.88 M_sun yr^{-1}, consistent with results from optical studies.
  • We have analyzed a sample of nearby cool and warm infrared (IR) galaxies using photometric and structural parameters. The set of measures include far-infrared color ($C = \log_{10}[S_{60\mu m}/S_{100\mu m}]$), total IR luminosity ($L_{TIR}$), radio surface brightness as well as radio, near-infrared, and optical sizes. In a given luminosity range cool and warm galaxies are considered as those sources that are found approximately $1 \sigma$ below and above the mean color in the far-infrared $C - L_{TIR}$ diagram. We find that galaxy radio surface brightness is well correlated with color whereas size is less well correlated with color. Our analysis indicates that IR galaxies that are dominated by cool dust are large, massive spirals that are not strongly interacting or merging and presumably the ones with the least active star formation. Dust in these cool objects is less centrally concentrated than in the more typical luminous and ultra-luminous IR galaxies that are dominated by warm dust. Our study also shows that low luminosity early type unbarred and transitional spirals are responsible for the large scatter in the $C - L_{TIR}$ diagram. Among highly luminous galaxies, late type unbarred spirals are predominately warm, and early type unbarred and barred are systematically cooler. We highlight the significance of $C - L_{TIR}$ diagram in terms of local and high redshifts sub-millimeter galaxies.
  • We have made a comparative study of morphological evolution in simulated DM halos and X-ray brightness distribution, and in optical clusters. Samples of simulated clusters include star formation with supernovae feedback, radiative cooling, and simulation in the adiabatic limit at three different redshifts, z = 0.0, 0.10, and 0.25. The optical sample contains 208 ACO clusters within redshift, $z \leq 0.25$. Cluster morphology, within 0.5 and 1.0 h$^{-1}$ Mpc from cluster center, is quantified by multiplicity and ellipticity. We find that the distribution of the dark matter halos in the adiabatic simulation appear to be more elongated than the galaxy clusters. Radiative cooling brings halo shapes in excellent agreement with observed clusters, however, cooling along with feedback mechanism make the halos more flattened. Our results indicate relatively stronger structural evolution and more clumpy distributions in observed clusters than in the structure of simulated clusters, and slower increase in simulated cluster shapes compared to those in the observed one. Within $z \leq 0.1$, we notice an interesting agreement in the shapes of clusters obtained from the cooling simulations and observation. We also notice that the different samples of observed clusters differ significantly in morphological evolution with redshift. We highlight a few possibilities responsible for the discrepancy in morphological evolution of simulated and observed clusters.
  • We study a sample of 112 galaxies of various Hubble types imaged in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) in the Near-Infra Red (NIR; 1-2 $\mu$m) $J$, $H$, and $K_s$ bands. The sample contains (optically classified) 32 elliptical, 16 lenticulars, and 64 spirals acquired from the 2MASS Extended Source Catalogue. We use a set of non-parametric shape measures constructed from the Minkowski Functionals (MFs) for galaxy shape analysis. We use ellipticity ($\epsilon$) and orientation angle ($\Phi$) as shape diagnostics. With these parameters as functions of area within the isophotal contour, we note that the NIR elliptical galaxies with $\epsilon > 0.2$ show a trend of being centrally spherical and increasingly flattened towards the edge, a trend similar to images in optical wavelengths. The highly flattened elliptical galaxies show strong change in ellipticity between the center and the edge. The lenticular galaxies show morphological properties resembling either ellipticals or disk galaxies. Our analysis shows that almost half of the spiral galaxies appear to have bar like features while the rest are likely to be non-barred. Our results also indicate that almost one-third of spiral galaxies have optically hidden bars. The isophotal twist noted in the orientations of elliptical galaxies decreases with the flattening of these galaxies indicating that twist and flattening are also anti-correlated in the NIR, as found in optical wavelengths. The orientations of NIR lenticular and spiral galaxies show a wide range of twists.
  • We have studied morphological evolution in clusters simulated in the adiabatic limit and with radiative cooling. Cluster morphology in the redshift range, $0 < z < 0.5$, is quantified by multiplicity and ellipticity. In terms of ellipticity, our result indicates slow evolution in cluster shapes compared to those observed in the X-ray and optical wavelengths. The result is consistent with Floor, Melott & Motl (2003). In terms of multiplicity, however, the result indicate relatively stronger evolution (compared to ellipticity but still weaker than observation) in the structure of simulated clusters suggesting that for comparative studies of simulation and observation, sub-structure measures are more sensitive than the shape measures. We highlight a few possibilities responsible for the discrepancy in the shape evolution of simulated and real clusters.
  • We suggest a set of morphological measures that we believe can help in quantifying the shapes of two-dimensional cosmological images such as galaxies, clusters, and superclusters of galaxies. The method employs non-parametric morphological descriptors known as the Minkowski functionals in combination with geometric moments widely used in the image analysis. For the purpose of visualization of the morphological properties of image contour lines we introduce three auxiliary ellipses representing the vector and tensor Minkowski functionals. We study the discreteness, seeing, and noise effects on elliptic contours as well as their morphological characteristics such as the ellipticity and orientation. In order to reduce the effect of noise we employ a technique of contour smoothing. We test the method by studying simulated elliptic profiles of toy spheroidal galaxies ranging in ellipticity from E0 to E7. We then apply the method to real galaxies, including eight spheroidals, three disk spirals and one peculiar galaxy, as imaged in the near-infrared $K_s$-band (2.2 microns) with the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). The method is numerically very efficient and can be used in the study of hundreds of thousands images obtained in modern surveys.
  • The study of shapes of the images of objects is an important issue not only because it reveals its dynamical state but also it helps to understand the object's evolutionary history. We discuss a new technique in cosmological image analysis which is based on a set of non-parametric shape descriptors known as the Minkowski Functionals (MFs). These functionals are extremely versatile and under some conditions give a complete description of the geometrical properties of objects. We believe that MFs could be a useful tool to extract information about the shapes of galaxies, clusters of galaxies and superclusters. The information revealed by MFs can be utilized along with the knowledge obtained from currently popular methods and thus could improve our understanding of the true shapes of cosmological objects.
  • We present a comparison between two observational and three theoretical mass functions for eight cosmological models suggested by the data from the recently completed BOOMERANG-98 and MAXIMA-1 cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments as well as peculiar velocities (PVs) and type Ia supernovae (SN) observations. The cosmological models have been proposed as the best fit models by several groups. We show that no model is in agreement with the abundances of X-ray clusters at $\sim 10^{14.7} h^{-1}M_{\odot}$.On the other hand, we find that the BOOM+MAX+{\sl COBE}:I, Refined Concordance and $\Lambda$MDM are in a good agreement with the abundances of optical clusters. The P11 and especially Concordance models predict a slightly lower abundances than observed at $\sim 10^{14.6} h^{-1}M_{\odot}$. The BOOM+MAX+{\sl COBE}:II and PV+CMB+SN models predict a slightly higher abundances than observed at $\sim 10^{14.9} h^{-1}M_{\odot}$. The nonflat MAXIMA-1 is in a fatal conflict with the observational cluster abundances and can be safely ruled out.