• The optical observations of Ic-4 supernova (SN) 2016coi/ASASSN-16fp, from $\sim 2$ to $\sim450$ days after explosion, are presented along with analysis of its physical properties. The SN shows the broad lines associated with SNe Ic-3/4 but with a key difference. The early spectra display a strong absorption feature at $\sim 5400$ \AA\ which is not seen in other SNe~Ic-3/4 at this epoch. This feature has been attributed to He I in the literature. Spectral modelling of the SN in the early photospheric phase suggests the presence of residual He in a C/O dominated shell. However, the behaviour of the He I lines are unusual when compared with He-rich SNe, showing relatively low velocities and weakening rather than strengthening over time. The SN is found to rise to peak $\sim 16$ d after core-collapse reaching a bolometric luminosity of Lp $\sim 3\times10^{42}$ \ergs. Spectral models, including the nebular epoch, show that the SN ejected $2.5-4$ \msun\ of material, with $\sim 1.5$ \msun\ below 5000 \kms, and with a kinetic energy of $(4.5-7)\times10^{51}$ erg. The explosion synthesised $\sim 0.14$ \msun\ of 56Ni. There are significant uncertainties in E(B-V)host and the distance however, which will affect Lp and MNi. SN 2016coi exploded in a host similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and away from star-forming regions. The properties of the SN and the host-galaxy suggest that the progenitor had $M_\mathrm{ZAMS}$ of $23-28$ \msun\ and was stripped almost entirely down to its C/O core at explosion.
  • V582 Aur is an FU Ori-type young eruptive star in outburst since $\sim$1985. The eruption is currently in a relatively constant plateau phase, with photometric and spectroscopic variability superimposed. Here we will characterize the progenitor of the outbursting object, explore its environment, and analyse the temporal evolution of the eruption. We are particularly interested in the physical origin of the two deep photometric dips, one occurred in 2012, and one is ongoing since 2016. We collected archival photographic plates, and carried out new optical, infrared, and millimeter wave photometric and spectroscopic observations between 2010 and 2017, with high sampling rate during the current minimum. Beside analysing the color changes during fading, we compiled multiepoch spectral energy distributions, and fitted them with a simple accretion disk model. Based on pre-outburst data and a millimeter continuum measurement, we suggest that the progenitor of the V582 Aur outburst is a low-mass T Tauri star with average properties. The mass of an unresolved circumstellar structure, probably a disk, is 0.04 M$_{\odot}$. The optical and near-infrared spectra demonstrate the presence of hydrogen and metallic lines, show the CO bandhead in absorption, and exhibit a variable H$\alpha$ profile. The color variations strongly indicate that both the $\sim$1 year long brightness dip in 2012, and the current minimum since 2016 are caused by increased extinction along the line of sight. According to our accretion disk models, the reddening changed from $A_V$=4.5 mag to 12.5 mag, while the accretion rate remained practically constant. Similarly to the models of the UXor phenomenon of intermediate and low-mass young stars, orbiting disk structures could be responsible for the eclipses.
  • We present the K2 light curves of a large sample of untargeted Main Belt asteroids (MBAs) detected with the Kepler space telescope. The asteroids were observed within the Uranus superstamp, a relatively large, continuous field with low stellar background designed to cover the planet Uranus and its moons during Campaign 8 of the K2 mission. The superstamp offered the possibility to obtain precise, uninterrupted light curves of a large number of MBAs and thus to determine unambiguous rotation rates for them. We obtained photometry for 608 MBAs, and were able to determine or estimate rotation rates for 90 targets, of which 86 had no known values before. In an additional 16 targets we detected incomplete cycles and/or eclipse-like events. We found the median rotation rate to be significantly longer than that of the ground-based observations indicating that the latter are biased towards shorter rotation rates. Our study highlights the need and benefits of further continuous photometry of asteroids.
  • In this paper we present visible range light curves of the irregular Uranian satellites Sycorax, Caliban, Prospero, Ferdinand and Setebos taken with Kepler Space Telescope in the course of the K2 mission. Thermal emission measurements obtained with the Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/MIPS instruments of Sycorax and Caliban were also analysed and used to determine size, albedo and surface characteristics of these bodies. We compare these properties with the rotational and surface characteristics of irregular satellites in other giant planet systems and also with those of main belt and Trojan asteroids and trans-Neptunian objects. Our results indicate that the Uranian irregular satellite system likely went through a more intense collisional evolution than the irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Surface characteristics of Uranian irregular satellites seems to resemble the Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects more than irregular satellites around other giant planets, suggesting the existence of a compositional discontinuity in the young Solar system inside the orbit of Uranus.
  • Due to the failure of the second reaction wheel, a new mission was conceived for the otherwise healthy Kepler space telescope. In the course of the K2 Mission, the telescope is staring at the plane of the Ecliptic, hence thousands of Solar System bodies cross the K2 fields, usually causing extra noise in the highly accurate photometric data. In this paper we follow the someone's noise is another one's signal principle and investigate the possibility of deriving continuous asteroid light curves, that has been unprecedented to date. In general, we are interested in the photometric precision that the K2 Mission can deliver on moving Solar System bodies. In particular, we investigate space photometric optical light curves of main-belt asteroids. We study the K2 superstamps covering the M35 and Neptune/Nereid fields observed in the long cadence (29.4-min sampling) mode. Asteroid light curves are generated by applying elongated apertures. We use the Lomb-Scargle method to find periodicities due to rotation. We derived K2 light curves of 924 main-belt asteroids in the M35 field, and 96 in the path of Neptune and Nereid. The light curves are quasi-continuous and several days long. K2 observations are sensitive to longer rotational periods than usual ground-based surveys. Rotational periods are derived for 26 main-belt asteroids for the first time. The asteroid sample is dominated by faint (>20 mag) objects. Due to the faintness of the asteroids and the high density of stars in the M35 field, only 4.0% of the asteroids with at least 12 data points show clear periodicities or trend signalling a long rotational period, as opposed to 15.9% in the less crowded Neptune field. We found that the duty cycle of the observations had to reach ~60% in order to successfully recover rotational periods.
  • We present fully covered phased light curves for 56 Jovian Trojan asteroids as acquired by the K2 mission of the Kepler space telescope. This set of objects has been monitored during Campaign 6 and represents a nearly unbiased subsample of the population of small Solar System bodies. We derived precise periods and amplitudes for all Trojans, and found their distributions to be compatible with the previous statistics. We point out, however, that ground-based rotation periods are often unreliable above 20h, and we find an overabundance of rotation periods above 60h compared with other minor planet populations. From amplitude analysis we derive a rate of binarity of 20$\pm$ 5%. Our spin rate distribution confirms the previously obtained spin barrier of ~5h and the corresponding ~0.5 g cm$^{-3}$ cometary-like density limit, also suggesting a high internal porosity for Jovian Trojans. One of our targets, asteroid 65227 exhibits a double rotation period, which can either be due to binarity or the outcome of a recent collision.