• Using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) we report the first band dispersions and distinct features of the bulk Fermi surface (FS) in the paramagnetic metallic phase of the prototypical metal-insulator transition material V$_2$O$_3$. Along the $c$-axis we observe both an electron pocket and a triangular hole-like FS topology, showing that both V 3$d$ $a_{1g}$ and $e_g^{\pi}$ states contribute to the FS. These results challenge the existing correlation-enhanced crystal field splitting theoretical explanation for the transition mechanism and pave the way for the solution of this mystery.
  • We report femtosecond resonant soft X-ray diffraction measurements of the dynamics of the charge order and of the crystal lattice in non-superconducting, stripe-ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4. Excitation of the in-plane Cu-O stretching phonon with a mid-infrared pulse has been previously shown to induce a transient superconducting state in the closely related compound La1.675Eu0.2Sr0.125CuO4. In La1.875Ba0.125CuO4, we find that the charge stripe order melts promptly on a sub-picosecond time scale. Surprisingly, the low temperature tetragonal distortion is only weakly reduced, reacting on significantly longer time scales that do not correlate with light-induced superconductivity. This experiment suggests that charge modulations alone, and not the LTT distortion, prevent superconductivity in equilibrium.
  • High temperature superconductivity in cuprates arises from an electronic state that remains poorly understood. We report the observation of a related electronic state in a non-cuprate material Sr2IrO4 in which the unique cuprate Fermiology is largely reproduced. Upon surface electron doping through in situ deposition of alkali-metal atoms, angle-resolved photoemission spectra of Sr2IrO4 display disconnected segments of zero-energy states, known as Fermi arcs, and a gap as large as 80 meV. Its evolution toward a normal metal phase with a closed Fermi surface as a function of doping and temperature parallels that in the cuprates. Our result suggests that Sr2IrO4 is a useful model system for comparison to the cuprates.
  • We investigate the order parameter dynamics of the stripe-ordered nickelate, La$_{1.75}$Sr$_{0.25}$NiO$_4$, using time-resolved resonant X-ray diffraction. In spite of distinct spin and charge energy scales, the two order parameters' amplitude dynamics are found to be linked together due to strong coupling. Additionally, the vector nature of the spin sector introduces a longer re-orientation time scale which is absent in the charge sector. These findings demonstrate that the correlation linking the symmetry-broken states does not unbind during the non-equilibrium process, and the time scales are not necessarily associated with the characteristic energy scales of individual degrees of freedom.
  • The dynamics of an order parameter's amplitude and phase determines the collective behaviour of novel states emerged in complex materials. Time- and momentum-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, by virtue of its ability to measure material properties at atomic and electronic time scales and create excited states not accessible by the conventional means can decouple entangled degrees of freedom by visualizing their corresponding dynamics in the time domain. Here, combining time-resolved femotosecond optical and resonant x-ray diffraction measurements on striped La1.75Sr0.25NiO4, we reveal unforeseen photo-induced phase fluctuations of the charge order parameter. Such fluctuations preserve long-range order without creating topological defects, unlike thermal phase fluctuations near the critical temperature in equilibrium10. Importantly, relaxation of the phase fluctuations are found to be an order of magnitude slower than that of the order parameter's amplitude fluctuations, and thus limit charge order recovery. This discovery of new aspect to phase fluctuation provides more holistic view for the importance of phase in ordering phenomena of quantum matter.
  • We report on the ultrafast dynamics of magnetic order in a single crystal of CuO at a temperature of 207 K in response to strong optical excitation using femtosecond resonant x-ray diffraction. In the experiment, a femtosecond laser pulse induces a sudden, nonequilibrium increase in magnetic disorder. After a short delay ranging from 400 fs to 2 ps, we observe changes in the relative intensity of the magnetic ordering diffraction peaks that indicate a shift from a collinear commensurate phase to a spiral incommensurate phase. These results indicate that the ultimate speed for this antiferromagnetic re-orientation transition in CuO is limited by the long-wavelength magnetic excitation connecting the two phases.
  • Optical control of magnetism, of interest for high-speed data processing and storage, has only been demonstrated with near-infrared excitation to date. However, in absorbing materials, such high photon energies can lead to significant dissipation, making switch back times long and miniaturization challenging. In manganites, magnetism is directly coupled to the lattice, as evidenced by the response to external and chemical pressure, or to ferroelectric polarization. Here, femtosecond mid-infrared pulses are used to excite the lattice in La0.5Sr1.5MnO4 and the dynamics of electronic order are measured by femtosecond resonant soft x-ray scattering with an x-ray free electron laser. We observe that magnetic and orbital orders are reduced by excitation of the lattice. This process, which occurs within few picoseconds, is interpreted as relaxation of the complex charge-orbital-spin structure following a displacive exchange quench - a prompt shift in the equilibrium value of the magnetic and orbital order parameters after the lattice has been distorted. A microscopic picture of the underlying unidirectional lattice displacement is proposed, based on nonlinear rectification of the directly-excited vibrational field, as analyzed in the specific lattice symmetry of La0.5Sr1.5MnO4. Control of magnetism through ultrafast lattice excitation has important analogies to the multiferroic effect and may serve as a new paradigm for high-speed optomagnetism.
  • Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), are presented. Single shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in "diffract and destroy" mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 micrometers in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused LCLS beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.6 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.
  • For epitaxial trilayers of the magnetic rare-earth metals Gd and Tb, exchange coupled through a non-magnetic Y spacer layer, element-specific hysteresis loops were recorded by the x-ray magneto-optical Kerr effect at the rare-earth $M_5$ thresholds. This allowed us to quantitatively determine the strength of interlayer exchange coupling (IEC). In addition to the expected oscillatory behavior as a function of spacer-layer thickness $d_Y$, a temperature-induced sign reversal of IEC was observed for constant $d_Y$, arising from magnetization-dependent electron reflectivities at the magnetic interfaces.
  • The epitaxial system Sm/Co(0001) was studied for Sm coverages up to 1 monolayer (ML) on top of ultrathin Co/W(110) epitaxial films. Two ordered phases were found for 1/3 and 1 ML Sm, respectively. The valence state of Sm was determined by means of photoemission and magnetic properties were measured by magneto-optical Kerr effect. We find that 1 ML Sm causes a strong increase of the coercivity with respect to that of the underlying 10 ML Co film. Element-specific hysteresis loops, measured by using resonant soft x-ray reflectivity, show the same magnetic behaviour for the two elements.
  • Lanthanide metals are a particular class of magnetic materials in which the magnetic moments are carried mainly by the localized electrons of the 4f shell. They are frequently found in technically relevant systems, to achieve, e.g., high magnetic anisotropy. Magneto-optical methods in the x-ray range are well suited to study complex magnetic materials in an element-specific way. In this work, we report on recent progress on the quantitative determination of magneto-optical constants of several lanthanides in the soft x-ray region and we show some examples of applications of magneto-optics to hard-magnetic interfaces and exchange-coupled layered structures containing lanthanide elements.
  • We give experimental and theoretical evidence of the Rashba effect at the magnetic rare-earth metal surface Gd(0001). The Rashba effect is substantially enhanced and the Rashba parameter changes its sign when a metal-oxide surface layer is formed. The experimental observations are quantitatively described by ab initio calculations that give a detailed account of the near-surface charge density gradients causing the Rashba effect. Since the sign of the Rashba splitting depends on the magnetization direction, the findings open up new opportunities for the study of surface and interface magnetism.
  • We present x-ray absorption spectra around the 3d-4f and 4d-4f excitation thresholds of in-plane magnetized Gd and Tb films measured by total electron yield using circularly polarized synchrotron radiation. By matching the experimental spectra to tabulated absorption data far below and above the thresholds, the imaginary parts of the complex refractive index are determined quantitatively. The associated real parts for circularly polarized light propagating nearly parallel or antiparallel to the magnetization direction are obtained through the Kramers-Kronig relations. The derived magnetooptical parameters are used to calculate soft x-ray reflectivity spectra of a magnetized Gd film at the 3d-4f threshold, which are found to compare well with our experimental spectra.
  • X-ray absorption spectra in a wide energy range around the 4d-4f excitation threshold of Gd were recorded by total electron yield from in-plane magnetized Gd metal films. Matching the experimental spectra to tabulated absorption data reveals unprecedented short light absorption lengths down to 3 nm. The associated real parts of the refractive index for circularly polarized light propagating parallel or antiparallel to the Gd magnetization, determined through the Kramers-Kronig transformation, correspond to a magneto-optical Faraday rotation of 0.7 degrees per atomic layer. This finding shall allow the study of magnetic structure and magnetization dynamics of lanthanide elements in nanosize systems and dilute alloys.