• We discuss images of the star clusters GLIMPSE C01 (GC01) and GLIMPSE C02 (GC02) that were recorded with the Subaru IRCS. Distortions in the wavefront were corrected with the RAVEN adaptive optics (AO) science demonstrator, allowing individual stars in the central regions of both clusters -- where the fractional contamination from non-cluster objects is lowest -- to be imaged. In addition to J, H, and K' images, both clusters were observed through a narrow-band filter centered near 3.05um; GC01 was also observed through two other narrow-band filters that sample longer wavelengths. Stars in the narrow-band images have a FWHM that is close to the telescope diffraction limit, demonstrating that open loop AO systems like RAVEN can deliver exceptional image quality. The near-infrared color magnitude diagram of GC01 is smeared by non-uniform extinction with a dispersion +/- 0.13 magnitudes in A_K. The Red Clump is identified in the K luminosity function (LF) of GC01, and a distance modulus of 13.6 is found. The K LF of GC01 is consistent with a system that is dominated by stars with an age > 1 Gyr. As for GC02, the K LF is flat for K > 16, and the absence of a sub-giant branch argues against an old age if the cluster is at a distance of ~ 7 kpc. Archival SPITZER [3.6] and [4.5] images of the clusters are also examined, and the red giant branch-tip is identified.
  • Near-infrared (NIR) spectra that have an angular resolution of ~ 0.15 arcsec are used to examine the stellar content of the central regions of the nearby elliptical galaxy Maffei 1. The spectra were recorded at the Subaru Telescope, with wavefront distortions corrected by the RAVEN Multi-Object Adaptive Optics science demonstrator. The Ballick-Ramsey C_2 absorption bandhead near 1.76 microns is detected, and models in which 10 - 20% of the light near 1.8 microns originates from stars of spectral type C5 reproduce this feature. Archival NIR and mid-infrared images are also used to probe the structural and photometric properties of the galaxy. Comparisons with models suggest that an intermediate age population dominates the spectral energy distribution between 1 and 5 microns near the galaxy center. This is consistent not only with the presence of C stars, but also with the large HBeta index that has been measured previously for Maffei 1. The J-K color is more-or-less constant within 15 arcsec of the galaxy center, suggesting that the brightest red stars are well-mixed in this area.
  • Studies are under way to propose a new generation of post-VLTI interferometers. The Carlina concept studied at the Haute- Provence Observatory is one of the proposed solutions. It consists in an optical interferometer configured like a diluted version of the Arecibo radio telescope: above the diluted primary mirror made of fixed cospherical segments, a helium balloon (or cables suspended between two mountains), carries a gondola containing the focal optics. Since 2003, we have been building a technical demonstrator of this diluted telescope. First fringes were obtained in May 2004 with two closely-spaced primary segments and a CCD on the focal gondola. We have been testing the whole optical train with three primary mirrors. The main aim of this article is to describe the metrology that we have conceived, and tested under the helium balloon to align the primary mirrors separate by 5-10 m on the ground with an accuracy of a few microns. The servo loop stabilizes the mirror of metrology under the helium balloon with an accuracy better than 5 mm while it moves horizontally by 30 cm in open loop by 10-20 km/h of wind. We have obtained the white fringes of metrology; i.e., the three mirrors are aligned (cospherized) with an accuracy of {\approx} 1 micron. We show data proving the stability of fringes over 15 minutes, therefore providing evidence that the mechanical parts are stabilized within a few microns. This is an important step that demonstrates the feasibility of building a diluted telescope using cables strained between cliffs or under a balloon. Carlina, like the MMT or LBT, could be one of the first members of a new class of telescopes named diluted telescopes.
  • In the future, optical stellar interferometers will provide true images thanks to larger number of telescopes and to advanced cophasing subsystems. These conditions are required to have sufficient resolution elements (resel) in the image and to provide direct images in the hypertelescope mode. It has already been shown that hypertelescopes provide snapshot images with a significant gain in sensitivity without inducing any loss of the useful field of view for direct imaging applications. This paper aims at studying the properties of the point spread functions of future large arrays using the hypertelescope mode. Numerical simulations have been performed and criteria have been defined to study the image properties. It is shown that the choice of the configuration of the array is a trade-off between the resolution, the halo level and the field of view. A regular pattern of the array of telescopes optimizes the image quality (low halo level and maximum encircled energy in the central peak), but decreases the useful field of view. Moreover, a non-redundant array is less sensitive to the space aliasing effect than a redundant array.
  • Long baseline interferometry is now a mature technique in the optical domain. Current interferometers are however highly limited in number of sub apertures and concepts are being developed for future generations of very large optical arrays and especially with the goal of direct imaging. In this paper, we study the effects of introducing single-mode fibers in direct imaging optical interferometers. We show how the flexibility of optical fibers is well adapted to the pupil densification scheme. We study the effects of the truncation of the gaussian beams in the imaging process, either in the Fizeau mode or in the densified pupil mode or in the densified image mode. Finally, in the pupil densification configuration, we identify an optimum of the diaphragm width. This optimum maximizes the on-axis irradiance and corresponds to a trade-off between the loss of transmission and the efficiency of the densification.
  • Future optical interferometric instrumentation mainly relies on the availability of an efficient cophasing system: once available, what has so far postponed the relevance of direct imaging with an interferometer will vanish. This paper focuses on the actual limits of snapshot imaging, inherent to the use of a sparse aperture: the number of telescopes and the geometry of the array impose the maximum extent of the field of view and the complexity of the sources. A second limitation may arise from the beam combination scheme. Comparing already available solutions, we show that the so called hypertelescope mode (or densified pupil) is ideal. By adjusting the direct imaging field of view to the useful field of view offered by the array, the hypertelescope makes an optimal use of the collected photons. It optimizes signal to noise ratio, drastically improves the luminosity of images and makes the interferometer compatible with coronagraphy, without inducing any loss of useful field of view.
  • We show star images obtained with a miniature ``densified pupil imaging interferometer'' also called a hyper-telescope. The formation of such images violates a ``golden rule of imaging interferometers'' which appeared to forbid the use of interferometric arrangements differing from a Fizeau interferometer. These produce useless images when the sub-apertures spacing is much wider than their size, owing to diffraction through the sub-apertures. The hyper-telescope arrangement solves these problems opening the way towards multi-kilometer imaging arrays in space. We experimentally obtain an intensity gain of 24 +- 3X when a densified-pupil interferometer is compared to an equivalent Fizeau-type interferometer and show images of the double star alpha Gem. The initial results presented confirm the possibility of directly obtaining high resolution and high dynamic range images in the recombined focal plane of a large interferometer if enough elements are used.