• Most recently, theoretical calculations predicted the stability of a novel two-dimensional phosphorus honeycomb lattice named blue phosphorus. Here, we report on the growth of blue phosphorus on Au(111) and unravel its structural details using diffraction, microscopy and theoretical calculations. Most importantly, by utilizing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we identify its momentum-resolved electronic structure. We find that Au(111) breaks the sublattice symmetry of blue phosphorus leading to an orbital-dependent band renormalization upon the formation of a (4x4) superstructure. Notably, the semiconducting two-dimensional phosphorus realizes its valence band maximum at 0.9 eV binding energy, however, shifted in momentum space due to the substrate-induced band renormalization.
  • We have synthesized single crystals of Dirac semimetal candidates AZnBi2 with A=Ba and Sr. In contrast to A=Sr, the Ba material displays a novel local Zn vacancy ordering, which makes the observation of quantum oscillations in out-of-plane magnetic fields possible. As a new Dirac semimetal candidate, BaZnBi2 exhibits small cyclotron electron mass, high quantum mobility, and non-trivial Berry phases. Three Dirac dispersions are observed by ARPES and identified by first- principles band-structure calculations. Compared to AMn(Bi/Sb)2 systems which host Mn magnetic moments, BaZnBi2 acts as non-magnetic analogue to investigate the intrinsic properties of Dirac fermions in this structure family.
  • Negative longitudinal magnetoresistance (NLMR) is shown to occur in topological materials in the extreme quantum limit, when a magnetic field is applied parallel to the excitation current. We perform pulsed and DC field measurements on Pb1-xSnxSe epilayers where the topological state can be chemically tuned. The NLMR is observed in the topological state, but is suppressed and becomes positive when the system becomes trivial. In a topological material, the lowest N=0 conduction Landau level disperses down in energy as a function of increasing magnetic field, while the N=0 valence Landau level disperses upwards. This anomalous behavior is shown to be responsible for the observed NLMR. Our work provides an explanation of the outstanding question of NLMR in topological insulators and establishes this effect as a possible hallmark of bulk conduction in topological matter.
  • Transmission of low-energetic electrons through two-dimensional materials leads to unique scattering resonances. These resonances contribute to photoemission from occupied bands where they appear as strongly dispersive features of suppressed photoelectron intensity. Using angle-resolved photoemission we have systematically studied scattering resonances in epitaxial graphene grown on the chemically differing substrates Ir(111), Bi/Ir, Ni(111) as well as in graphene/Ir(111) nanopatterned with a superlattice of uniform Ir quantum dots. While the strength of the chemical interaction with the substrate has almost no effect on the dispersion of the scattering resonances, their energy can be controlled by the magnitude of charge transfer from/to graphene. At the same time, a superlattice of small quantum dots deposited on graphene eliminates the resonances completely. We ascribe this effect to a nanodot-induced buckling of graphene and its local rehybridization from sp$^{2}$ to sp$^{3}$ towards a three-dimensional structure. Our results suggest nanopatterning as a prospective tool for tuning optoelectronic properties of two-dimensional materials with graphene-like structure.
  • Using time- and angle-resolved photoemission, we investigate the ultrafast response of excited electrons in the ternary topological insulator (Bi$_{1 x}$Sb$_{x}$)$_2$Te$_3$ to fs-infrared pulses. We demonstrate that at the critical concentration $x$=0.55, where the system becomes bulk insulating, a surface voltage can be driven at room temperature through the topological surface state solely by optical means. We further show that such a photovoltage persists over a time scale that exceeds $\sim$6 $\mu$s, i.e, much longer than the characteristic relaxation times of bulk states. We attribute the origin of the photovoltage to a laser-induced band-bending effect which emerges near the surface region on ultrafast time scales. The photovoltage is also accompanied by a remarkable increase in the relaxation times of excited states as compared to undoped topological insulators. Our findings are relevant in the context of applications of topological surface states in future optical devices.
  • We perform ultrahigh resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments at a temperature T=0.8 K on the type-II Weyl semimetal candidate WTe$_{2}$. We find a surface Fermi arc connecting the bulk electron and hole pockets on the (001) surface. Our results show that the surface Fermi arc connectivity to the bulk bands is strongly mediated by distinct surface resonances dispersing near the border of the surface-projected bulk band gap. By comparing the experimental results to first-principles calculations we argue that the coupling to these surface resonances, which are topologically trivial, is compatible with the classification of WTe$_{2}$ as a type-II Weyl semimetal hosting topological Fermi arcs. We further support our conclusion by a systematic characterization of the bulk and surface character of the different bands and discuss the similarity of our findings to the case of topological insulators.
  • Magnetic doping is expected to open a band gap at the Dirac point of topological insulators by breaking time-reversal symmetry and to enable novel topological phases. Epitaxial (Bi$_{1-x}$Mn$_{x}$)$_{2}$Se$_{3}$ is a prototypical magnetic topological insulator with a pronounced surface band gap of $\sim100$ meV. We show that this gap is neither due to ferromagnetic order in the bulk or at the surface nor to the local magnetic moment of the Mn, making the system unsuitable for realizing the novel phases. We further show that Mn doping does not affect the inverted bulk band gap and the system remains topologically nontrivial. We suggest that strong resonant scattering processes cause the gap at the Dirac point and support this by the observation of in-gap states using resonant photoemission. Our findings establish a novel mechanism for gap opening in topological surface states which challenges the currently known conditions for topological protection.
  • A comprehensive mapping of the spin polarization of the electronic bands in ferroelectric a-GeTe(111) films has been performed using a time-of-flight momentum microscope equipped with an imaging spin filter that enables a simultaneous measurement of more than 10.000 data points (voxels). A Rashba type splitting of both surface and bulk bands with opposite spin helicity of the inner and outer Rashba bands is found revealing a complex spin texture at the Fermi energy. The switchable inner electric field of GeTe implies new functionalities for spintronic devices.
  • Intercalation of Au can produce giant Rashba-type spin-orbit splittings in graphene but this has not yet been achieved on a semiconductor substrate. For graphene/SiC(0001), Au intercalation yields two phases with different doping. Here, we report the preparation of an almost pure p-type graphene phase after Au intercalation. We observe a 100 meV Rashba-type spin-orbit splitting at 0.9 eV binding energy. We show that this giant splitting is due to hybridization and much more limited in energy and momentum space than for Au-intercalated graphene on Ni.
  • Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) are characterized by spin-polarized Dirac-cone surface states that are protected from backscattering by time-reversal symmetry. Control of the spin polarization of topological surface states (TSSs) using femtosecond light pulses opens novel perspectives for the generation and manipulation of dissipationless surface spin currents on ultrafast timescales. Using time-, spin-, and angle-resolved spectroscopy, we directly monitor for the first time the ultrafast response of the spin polarization of photoexcited TSSs to circularly-polarized femtosecond pulses of infrared light. We achieve all-optical switching of the transient out-of-plane spin polarization, which relaxes in about 1.2 ps. Our observations establish the feasibility of ultrafast optical control of spin-polarized Dirac fermions in TIs and pave the way for novel optospintronic applications at ultimate speeds.
  • We analyze the strong hexagonal warping of the Dirac cone of Bi$_2$Te$_3$ by angle-resolved photoemission. Along $\overline{\Gamma}$$\overline{\rm M}$, the dispersion deviates from a linear behavior meaning that the Dirac cone is warped outwards and not inwards. We show that this introduces an anisotropy in the lifetime broadening of the topological surface state which is larger along $\overline{\Gamma}$$\overline{\rm K}$. The result is not consistent with nesting. Based on the theoretically predicted behavior of the ground-state spin texture of a strongly warped Dirac cone, we propose spin-dependent scattering processes as explanation for the anisotropic scattering rates. These results could help paving the way for optimizing future spintronic devices using topological insulators and controlling surface-scattering processes via external gate voltages.
  • Recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest that SmB$_6$ is the first topological Kondo insulator: A material in which the interaction between localized and itinerant electrons renders the bulk insulating at low temperature, while topological surface states leave the surface metallic. While this would elegantly explain the material's puzzling conductivity, we find the experimentally observed candidates for both predicted topological surface states to be of trivial character instead: The surface state at $\bar{\Gamma}$ is very heavy and shallow with a mere $\sim 2$ meV binding energy. It exhibits large Rashba splitting which excludes a topological nature. We further demonstrate that the other metallic surface state, located at $\bar{X}$, is not an independent in-gap state as supposed previously, but part of a massive band with much higher binding energy (1.7 eV). We show that it remains metallic down to 1 K due to reduced hybridization with the energy-shifted surface 4$f$ level.
  • Topological insulators are characterized by Dirac cone surface states with electron spins aligned in the surface plane and perpendicular to their momenta. Recent theoretical and experimental work implied that this specific spin texture should enable control of photoelectron spins by circularly polarized light. However, these reports questioned the so far accepted interpretation of spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. We solve this puzzle and show that vacuum ultraviolet photons (50-70 eV) with linear or circular polarization probe indeed the initial state spin texture of Bi$_2$Se$_3$ while circularly polarized 6 eV low energy photons flip the electron spins out of plane and reverse their spin polarization. Our photoemission calculations, considering the interplay between the varying probing depth, dipole selection rules and spin-dependent scattering effects involving initial and final states explain these findings, and reveal proper conditions for light-induced spin manipulation. This paves the way for future applications of topological insulators in opto-spintronic devices.
  • Quantitative understanding of the relationship between quantum tunneling and Fermi surface spin polarization is key to device design using topological insulator surface states. By using spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with p-polarized light in topological insulator Bi2Se3 thin films across the metal-to-insulator transition, we observe that for a given film thickness, the spin polarization is large for momenta far from the center of the surface Brillouin zone. In addition, the polarization decreases significantly with enhanced tunneling realized systematically in thin insulating films, whereas magnitude of the polarization saturates to the bulk limit faster at larger wavevectors in thicker metallic films. Our theoretical model calculations capture this delicate relationship between quantum tunneling and Fermi surface spin polarization. Our results suggest that the polarization current can be tuned to zero in thin insulating films forming the basis for a future spin-switch nano-device.
  • The helical Dirac fermions at the surface of topological insulators show a strong circular dichroism which has been explained as being due to either the initial-state spin angular momentum, the initial-state orbital angular momentum, or the handedness of the experimental setup. All of these interpretations conflict with our data from Bi2Te3 which depend on the photon energy and show several sign changes. Our one-step photoemission calculations coupled to ab initio theory confirm the sign change and assign the dichroism to a final-state effect. The spin polarization of the photoelectrons, instead, remains a reliable probe for the spin in the initial state.
  • Graphene grown on Fe(110)by chemical vapor deposition using propylene is investigated by means of angle-resolved photoemission. The presence of massless Dirac fermions is clearly evidenced by the observation of a fully intact Dirac cone. Unlike Ni(111) and Co(0001), the Fe(110) imposes a strongly anisotropic quasi-one-dimensional structure on the graphene. Certain signatures of a superlattice effect appear in the dispersion of its \sigma-bands but the Dirac cone does not reveal any detectable superlattice or quantum-size effects although the graphene corrugation is twice as large as in the established two-dimensional graphene superlattice on Ir(111).
  • The surface of topological insulators is proposed as a promising platform for spintronics and quantum information applications. In particular, when time- reversal symmetry is broken, topological surface states are expected to exhibit a wide range of exotic spin phenomena for potential implementation in electronics. Such devices need to be fabricated using nanoscale artificial thin films. It is of critical importance to study the spin behavior of artificial topological MBE thin films associated with magnetic dopants, and with regards to quantum size effects related to surface-to-surface tunneling as well as experimentally isolate time-reversal breaking from non-intrinsic surface electronic gaps. Here we present observation of the first (and thorough) study of magnetically induced spin reorientation phenomena on the surface of a topological insulator. Our results reveal dramatic rearrangements of the spin configuration upon magnetic doping contrasted with chemically similar nonmagnetic doping as well as with quantum tunneling phenomena in ultra-thin high quality MBE films. While we observe that the spin rearrangement induced by quantum tunneling occurs in a time-reversal invariant fashion, we present critical and systematic observation of an out-of-plane spin texture evolution correlated with magnetic interactions, which breaks time-reversal symmetry, demonstrating microscopic TRB at a Kramers' point on the surface.
  • Using high resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we map the electronic structure and spin texture of the surface states of the topological insulator Sb2Te3. In combination with density functional calculations (DFT), we directly show that Sb2Te3 exhibits a partially occupied, single spin-Dirac cone around the Fermi energy, which is topologically protected. DFT obtains a spin polarization of the occupied Dirac cone states of 80-90%, which is in reasonable agreement with the experimental data after careful background subtraction. Furthermore, we observe a strongly spin-orbit split surface band at lower energy. This state is found at 0.8eV below the Fermi level at the gamma-point, disperses upwards, and disappears at about 0.4eV below the Fermi level into two different bulk bands. Along the gamma-K direction, the band is located within a spin-orbit gap. According to an argument given by Pendry and Gurman in 1975, such a gap must contain a surface state, if it is located away from the high symmetry points of the Brillouin zone. Thus, the novel spin-split state is protected by symmetry, too.
  • Graphene in spintronics has so far primarily meant spin current leads of high performance because the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling of its pi-electrons is very weak. If a large spin-orbit coupling could be created by a proximity effect, the material could also form active elements of a spintronic device such as the Das-Datta spin field-effect transistor, however, metal interfaces often compromise the band dispersion of massless Dirac fermions. Our measurements show that Au intercalation at the graphene-Ni interface creates a giant spin-orbit splitting (~100 meV) in the graphene Dirac cone up to the Fermi energy. Photoelectron spectroscopy reveals hybridization with Au-5d states as the source for the giant spin-orbit splitting. An ab initio model of the system shows a Rashba-split dispersion with the analytically predicted gapless band topology around the Dirac point of graphene and indicates that a sharp graphene-Au interface at equilibrium distance will account for only ~10 meV spin-orbit splitting. The ab initio calculations suggest an enhancement due to Au atoms that get closer to the graphene and do not violate the sublattice symmetry.
  • Topological insulators have been successfully identified by spin-resolved photoemission but the spin polarization remained low (~20%). We show for Bi2Te3 that the in-gap surface state is much closer to full spin polarization with measured values reaching 80% at the Fermi level. When hybridizing with the bulk it remains highly spin polarized which may explain recent unusual quantum interference results on Bi2Se3. The topological surface state shows a large circular dichroism in the photoelectron angle distribution with an asymmetry of ~20% the sign of which corresponds to that of the measured spin.
  • Spin currents which allow for a dissipationless transport of information can be generated by electric fields in semiconductor heterostructures in the presence of a Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling. The largest Rashba effects occur for electronic surface states of metals but these cannot exist but under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Here, we reveal a giant Rashba effect ({\alpha}_R ~ 1.5E-10 eVm) on a surface state of Ir(111). We demonstrate that its spin splitting and spin polarization remain unaffected when Ir is covered with graphene. The graphene protection is, in turn, sufficient for the spin-split surface state to survive in ambient atmosphere. We discuss this result along with evidences for a topological protection of the surface state.
  • We report on a quantitative investigation of the spin-dependent quasiparticle lifetimes and electron correlation effects in ferromagnetic hcp Co(0001) by means of spin and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The experimental spectra are compared in detail to state-of-the-art many-body calculations within the dynamical mean field theory and the three-body scattering approximation, including a full calculation of the one-step photoemission process. From this comparison we conclude that although strong local many-body Coulomb interactions are of major importance for the qualitative description of correlation effects in Co, more sophisticated many-body calculations are needed in order to improve the quantitative agreement between theory and experiment, in particular concerning the linewidths. The quality of the overall agreement obtained for Co indicates that the effect of non-local correlations becomes weaker with increasing atomic number.
  • The strength of electronic correlation effects in the spin-dependent electronic structure of ferromagnetic bcc Fe(110) has been investigated by means of spin and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared to theoretical calculations within the three-body scattering approximation and within the dynamical mean-field theory, together with one-step model calculations of the photoemission process. This comparison indicates that the present state of the art many-body calculations, although improving the description of correlation effects in Fe, give too small mass renormalizations and scattering rates thus demanding more refined many-body theories including non-local fluctuations.
  • High-resolution photoemission spectroscopy and realistic ab-initio calculations have been employed to analyze the onset and progression of d-sp hybridization in Fe impurities deposited on alkali metal films. The interplay between delocalization, mediated by the free-electron environment, and Coulomb interaction among d-electrons gives rise to complex electronic configurations. The multiplet structure of a single Fe atom evolves and gradually dissolves into a quasiparticle peak near the Fermi level with increasing the host electron density. The effective multi-orbital impurity problem within the exact diagonalization scheme describes the whole range of hybridizations.
  • We present angle-resolved photoemission spectra of the $\gamma$-phase of manganese as well as a theoretical analysis using a recently developed approach that combines density functional and dynamical mean field methods (LDA+DMFT). The comparison of experimental data and theoretical predictions allows us to identify effects of the Coulomb correlations, namely the presence of broad and undispersive Hubbard bands in this system.