• The plasma panel sensor is an ionizing photon and particle radiation detector derived from PDP technology with high gain and nanosecond response. Experimental results in detecting cosmic ray muons and beta particles from radioactive sources are described along with applications including high energy and nuclear physics, homeland security and cancer therapeutics
  • We calculate pseudorapidity ($\eta$) asymmetry in $pA$ and $dA$ collisions in a pQCD-improved parton model. With the calculations tuned to describe existing spectra from $pp$ collisions and asymmetric systems at midrapidity and large rapidities at FNAL and RHIC energies, we investigate the roles of nuclear shadowing and multiple scattering on the observed asymmetry. Using this framework, we make predictions for pseudorapidity asymmetries at high $p_T$ and large $\eta$ in a wide range of energies up to LHC.
  • We report measurements of the optical gap in a GdN film at temperatures from 300 to 6K, covering both the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic phases. The gap is 1.31eV in the paramagnetic phase and red-shifts to 0.9eV in the spin-split bands below the Curie temperature. The paramagnetic gap is larger than was suggested by very early experiments, and has permitted us to refine a (LSDA+U)-computed band structure. The band structure was computed in the full translation symmetry of the ferromagnetic ground state, assigning the paramagnetic-state gap as the average of the majority- and minority-spin gaps in the ferromagnetic state. That procedure has been further tested by a band structure in a 32-atom supercell with randomly-oriented spins. After fitting only the paramagnetic gap the refined band structure then reproduces our measured gaps in both phases by direct transitions at the X point.
  • We propose a way to make arrays of optical frequency dipole-force microtraps for cold atoms above a dielectric substrate. Traps are nodes in the evanescent wave fields above an optical waveguide resulting from interference of different waveguide modes. The traps have features sought in developing neutral atom based architectures for quantum computing: ~ 1 mW of laser power yields very tight traps 150 nm above a waveguide with trap vibrational frequencies ~ 1 MHz and vibrational ground state sizes ~ 10 nm. The arrays are scalable and allow addressing of individual sites for quantum logic operations.
  • We propose a way to make arrays of optical frequency dipole-force microtraps for cold atoms above a dielectric substrate. Traps are nodes in the evanescent wave fields above an optical waveguide resulting from interference of different waveguide modes. The traps have features sought in developing neutral atom based architectures for quantum computing: ~ 1 mW of laser power yields very tight traps 150 nm above a waveguide with trap vibrational frequencies ~ 1 MHz and vibrational ground state sizes ~ 10 nm. The arrays are scalable and allow addressing of individual sites for quantum logic operations.
  • We present results of experimental and theoretical investigations of electron transport through stub-shaped waveguides or electron stub tuners (ESTs) in the ballistic regime. Measurements of the conductance G as a function of voltages, applied to different gates V_i (i=bottom, top, and side) of the device, show oscillations in the region of the first quantized plateau which we attribute to reflection resonances. The oscillations are rather regular and almost periodic when the height h of the EST cavity is small compared to its width. When h is increased, the oscillations become less regular and broad depressions in G appear. A theoretical analysis, which accounts for the electrostatic potential formed by the gates in the cavity region, and a numerical computation of the transmission probabilities successfully explains the experimental observations. An important finding for real devices, defined by surface Schottky gates, is that the resonance nima result from size quantization along the transport direction of the EST.
  • Recent advances in theoretical atomic physics have enabled large-scale calculation of atomic parameters for a variety of atomic processes with high degree of precision. The development and application of these methods is the aim of the Iron Project. At present the primary focus is on collisional processes for all ions of iron, Fe I- FeXXVI, and other iron-peak elements; new work on radiative processes has also been initiated. Varied applications of the Iron Project work to X-ray astronomy are discussed, and more general applications to other spectral ranges are pointed out. The IP work forms the basis for more specialized projects such as the RMaX Project, and the work on photoionization/recombination, and aims to provide a comprehensive and self-consistent set of accurate collsional and radiative cross sections, and transition probabilities, within the framework of relativistic close coupling formulation using the Breit-Pauli R-Matrix method. An illustrative example is presented of how the IP data may be utilised in the formation of X-ray spectra of the K$\alpha$ complex at 6.7 keV from He-like Fe XXV.
  • Ab initio theoretical calculations are reported for the electric (E1) dipole allowed and intercombination fine structure transitions in Fe V using the Breit-Pauli R-matrix (BPRM) method. We obtain 3865 bound fine structure levels of Fe V and $1.46 x 10^6$ oscillator strengths, Einstein A-coefficients and line strengths. In addition to the relativistic effects, the intermediate coupling calculations include extensive electron correlation effects that represent the complex configuration interaction (CI). Fe V bound levels are obtained with angular and spin symmetries $SL\pi$ and $J\pi$ of the (e + Fe VI) system such that $2S+1$ = 5,3,1, $L \leq$ 10, $J \leq 8$. The bound levels are obtained as solutions of the Breit-Pauli (e + ion) Hamiltonian for each $J\pi$, and are designated according to the `collision' channel quantum numbers. A major task has been the identification of these large number of bound fine structure levels in terms of standard spectroscopic designations. A new scheme, based on the analysis of quantum defects and channel wavefunctions, has been developed. The identification scheme aims particularly to determine the completeness of the results in terms of all possible bound levels for applications to analysis of experimental measurements and plasma modeling. An uncertainty of 10-20% for most transitions is estimated.