• These lecture notes are based on the hand-written notes which I prepared for the cosmology course taught to graduate students of PPGFis and PPGCosmo at the Federal University of Esp\'irito Santo (UFES), starting from 2014. This course covers topics ranging from the evidence of the expanding universe to Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies. They can be found also on my personal webpage http://ofp.cosmo-ufes.org/ and shall be published by Springer in 2018.
  • We investigate the effect of the redshift drift in strong gravitational lensing. The redshift drift produces a time variation of $i)$ the apparent position of a lensed source and $ii)$ the time delay among incoming signals from different images. We dub these effects as angular drift and time delay drift, respectively, and analyze their relevance in cosmology.
  • The k-essence theory with a power-law function of $(\partial\phi)^2$ and Rastall's non-conservative theory of gravity with a scalar field are shown to have the same solutions for the metric under the assumption that both the metric and the scalar fields depend on a single coordinate. This equivalence (called k-R duality) holds for static configurations with various symmetries (spherical, plane, cylindrical, etc.) and all homogeneous cosmologies. In the presence of matter, Rastall's theory requires additional assumptions on how the stress-energy tensor non-conservation is distributed between different contributions. Two versions of such non-conservation are considered in the case of isotropic spatially flat cosmological models with a perfect fluid: one (R1) in which there is no coupling between the scalar field and the fluid, and another (R2) in which the fluid separately obeys the usual conservation law. In version R1 it is shown that k-R duality holds not only for the cosmological models themselves but also for their adiabatic perturbations. In version R2, among other results, a particular model is singled out that reproduces the same cosmological expansion history as the standard $\Lambda$CDM model but predicts different behaviors of small fluctuations in the k-essence and Rastall frameworks.
  • We consider cosmological backreaction effects in Buchert's averaging formalism on the basis of an explicit solution of the Lema\^itre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) dynamics which is linear in the LTB curvature parameter and has an inhomogeneous bang time. The volume Hubble rate is found in terms of the volume scale factor which represents a derivation of the simplest phenomenological solution of Buchert's equations in which the fractional densities corresponding to average curvature and kinematic backreaction are explicitly determined by the parameters of the underlying LTB solution at the boundary of the averaging volume. This configuration represents an exactly solvable toy model but it does not adequately describe our "real" Universe.
  • We analyse $f(R)$ theories of gravity from a dynamical system perspective, showing how the $R^2$ correction in Starobinsky's model plays a crucial role from the viewpoint of the inflationary paradigm. Then, we propose a modification of Starobinsky's model by adding an exponential term in the $f(R)$ Lagrangian. We show how this modification could allow to test the robustness of the model by means of the predictions on the scalar spectral index $n_s$.
  • We analyze the effect of the cosmological expansion on the deflection of light caused by a point mass, adopting the McVittie metric as the geometrical description of a pointlike lens embedded in an expanding universe. In the case of a generic, non-constant Hubble parameter $H$ we derive and approximately solve the null geodesic equations, finding an expression for the bending angle $\delta$, which we expand in powers of the mass-to-closest approach distance ratio and of the impact parameter-to-lens distance ratio. It turns out that the leading order of the aforementioned expansion is the same as the one calculated for the Schawarzschild metric and that cosmological corrections contribute to $\delta$ only at sub-dominant orders. We explicitly calculate these cosmological corrections for the case of $H$ constant and find that they provide a correction of order $10^{-11}$ on the lens mass estimate.
  • There are some approaches, either based on General Relativity (GR) or modified gravity, that use galaxy rotation curves to derive the matter density of the corresponding galaxy, and this procedure would either indicate a partial or a complete elimination of dark matter in galaxies. Here we review these approaches, clarify the difficulties on this inverted procedure, present a method for evaluating them, and use it to test two specific approaches that are based on GR: the Cooperstock-Tieu (CT) and the Balasin-Grumiller (BG) approaches. Using this new method, we find that neither of the tested approaches can satisfactorily fit the observational data without dark matter. The CT approach results can be significantly improved if some dark matter is considered, while for the BG approach no usual dark matter halo can improve its results.
  • We investigate the effect of the cosmological expansion on the bending of light due to an isolated point-like mass. We adopt McVittie metric as the model for the geometry of the lens. Assuming a constant Hubble factor we find an analytic expression involving the bending angle, which turns out to be unaffected by the cosmological expansion at the leading order.
  • We analyze the quantum-mechanical behavior of a system described by a one-dimensional asymmetric potential constituted by a step plus (i) a linear barrier or (ii) an exponential barrier. We solve the energy eigenvalue equation by means of the integral representation method, classifying the independent solutions as equivalence classes of homotopic paths in the complex plane. We discuss the structure of the bound states as function of the height U_0 of the step and we study the propagation of a sharp-peaked wave packet reflected by the barrier. For both the linear and the exponential barrier we provide an explicit formula for the delay time \tau(E) as a function of the peak energy E. We display the resonant behavior of \tau(E) at energies close to U_0. By analyzing the asymptotic behavior for large energies of the eigenfunctions of the continuous spectrum we also show that, as expected, \tau(E) approaches the classical value for E -> \infty, thus diverging for the step-linear case and vanishing for the step-exponential one.
  • We present a new approximation to include fully general relativistic pressure and velocity in Newtonian hydrodynamics. The energy conservation, momentum conservation and two Poisson's equations are consistently derived from Einstein's gravity in the zero-shear gauge assuming weak gravity and action-at-a-distance limit. The equations show proper special relativity limit in the absence of gravity. Our approximation is complementary to the post-Newtonian approximation and the equations are valid in fully nonlinear situations.
  • We consider an effective viscous pressure as the result of a backreaction of inhomogeneities within Buchert's formalism. The use of an effective metric with a time-dependent curvature radius allows us to calculate the luminosity distance of the backreaction model. This quantity is different from its counterpart for a "conventional" spatially flat bulk viscous fluid universe. Both expressions are tested against the SNIa data of the Union2.1 sample with only marginally different results for the distance-redshift relation and in accordance with the $\Lambda$CDM model. Future observations are expected to be able to discriminate among these models on the basis of indirect measurements of the curvature evolution.
  • The Brans-Dicke action is one of the most natural extensions of the Einstein-Hilbert action. It is based on the introduction of a fundamental scalar field that effectively incorporates a dynamics to the gravitational coupling $G$. In spite of the diverse motivations and the rich phenomenology that comes from its solutions, Solar System tests impose strong constraints on the Brans-Dicke theory, rendering it indistinguishable from General Relativity. In the present text, new perspectives for the Brans-Dicke theory are presented, based on the possibility that the scalar field presented in the BD theory can be external, as well as on the applications to black hole physics and the primordial universe.
  • We show that Renormalization Group extensions of the Einstein-Hilbert action for large scale physics are not, in general, a particular case of standard Scalar-Tensor (ST) gravity. We present a new class of ST actions, in which the potential is not necessarily fixed at the action level, and show that this extended ST theory formally contains the Renormalization Group case. We also propose here a Renormalization Group scale setting identification that is explicitly covariant and valid for arbitrary relativistic fluids.
  • The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation provides a remarkable window onto the early universe, revealing its composition and structure. In these lectures we review and discuss the physics underlying the main features of the CMB.
  • We formulate a theory combining the principles of a scalar-tensor gravity and Rastall's proposal of a violation of the usual conservation laws. We obtain a scalar-tensor theory with two parameters $\omega$ and $\lambda$, the latter quantifying the violation of the usual conservation laws. The only exact spherically symmetric solution is that of Robinson-Bertotti besides Schwarzschild solution. A PPN analysis reveals that General Relativity results are reproduced when $\lambda = 0$. The cosmological case displays a possibility of deceleration/acceleration or acceleration/deceleration transitions during the matter dominated phase depending on the values of the free parameters.
  • Rastall's theory is a modification of Einstein's theory of gravity where the covariant divergence of the stress-energy tensor is no more vanishing, but proportional to the gradient of the Ricci scalar. The motivation of this theory is to investigate a possible non-minimal coupling of the matter fields to geometry which, being proportional to the curvature scalar, may represent an effective description of quantum gravity effects. Non-conservation of the stress-energy tensor, via Bianchi identities, implies new field equations which have been recently used in a cosmological context, leading to some interesting results. In this paper we adopt Rastall's theory to reproduce some features of the effective Friedmann's equation emerging from loop quantum cosmology. We determine a class of bouncing cosmological solutions and comment about the possibility of employing these models as effective descriptions of the full quantum theory.
  • We investigate the correspondence between a perfect fluid and a scalar field and show a possible way of expressing thermodynamic quantities such as entropy, particle number density, temperature and chemical potential in terms of the scalar field phi and its kinetic term X. We prove a theorem which relates isentropy with purely kinetic Lagrangian. As an application, we study the evolution of the gravitational potential in cosmological perturbation theory.
  • We discuss solutions of Vlasov-Einstein equation for collisionless dark matter particles in the context of a flat Friedmann universe. We show that, after decoupling from the primordial plasma, the dark matter phase-space density indicator Q remains constant during the expansion of the universe, prior to structure formation. This well known result is valid for non-relativistic particles and is not "observer dependent" as in solutions derived from the Vlasov-Poisson system. In the linear regime, the inclusion of velocity dispersion effects permits to define a physical Jeans length for collisionless matter as function of the primordial phase-space density indicator: \lambda_J = (5\pi/G)^(1/2)Q^(-1/3)\rho_dm^(-1/6). The comoving Jeans wavenumber at matter-radiation equality is smaller by a factor of 2-3 than the comoving wavenumber due to free-streaming, contributing to the cut-off of the density fluctuation power spectrum at the lowest scales. We discuss the physical differences between these two scales. For dark matter particles of mass equal to 200 GeV, the derived Jeans mass is 4.3 x 10^(-6) solar masses.
  • We investigate the unification scenario provided by the generalised Chaplygin gas model (a perfect fluid characterized by an equation of state p = -A/\rho^{\alpha}). Our concerns lie with a possible tension existing between background kinematic tests and those related to the evolution of small perturbations. We analyse data from the observation of the differential age of the universe, type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations and the position of the first peak of the angular spectrum of the cosmic background radiation. We show that these tests favour negative values of the parameter \alpha: we find \alpha = - 0.089^{+0.161}_{-0.128} at the 2\sigma\ level and that \alpha < 0 with 85% confidence. These would correspond to negative values of the square speed of sound which are unacceptable from the point of view of structure formation. We discuss a possible solution to this problem, when the generalised Chaplygin gas is framed in the modified theory of gravity proposed by Rastall. We show that a fluid description within this theory does not serve the purpose, but it is necessary to frame the generalised Chaplygin gas in a scalar field theory. Finally, we address the standard general relativistic unification picture provided by the generalised Chaplygin gas in the case \alpha = 0: this is usually considered to be undistinguishable from the standard \Lambda CDM model, but we show that the evolution of small perturbations, governed by the M\'esz\'aros equation, is indeed different and the formation of sub-horizon GCG matter halos may be importantly affected in comparison with the \Lambda CDM scenario.
  • We explore the phenomenology of nontrivial quantum effects on low-energy gravity. These effects come from the running of the gravitational coupling parameter G and the cosmological constant L in the Einstein-Hilbert action, as induced by the Renormalization Group (RG). The Renormalization Group corrected General Relativity (RGGR model) is used to parametrize these quantum effects, and it is assumed that the dominant dark matter-like effects inside galaxies is due to these nontrivial RG effects. Here we present additional details on the RGGR model application, in particular on the Poisson equation extension that defines the effective potential, also we re-analyse the ordinary elliptical galaxy NGC 4494 using a slightly different model for its baryonic contribution, and explicit solutions are presented for the running of G and L. The values of the NGC 4494 parameters as shown here have a better agreement with the general RGGR picture for galaxies, and suggest a larger radial anisotropy than the previously published result.
  • We review the difficulties of the generalized Chaplygin gas model to fit observational data, due to the tension between background and perturbative tests. We argue that such issues may be circumvented by means of a self-interacting scalar field representation of the model. However, this proposal seems to be successful only if the self-interacting scalar field has a non-canonical form. The latter can be implemented in Rastall's theory of gravity.
  • Rastall's theory is based on the non-conservation of the energy-momentum tensor. We show that, in this theory, if we introduce a two-fluid model, one component representing vacuum energy whereas the other pressureless matter (e.g. baryons plus cold dark matter), the cosmological scenario is the same as for the \Lambda CDM model, both at background and linear perturbative levels, except for one aspect: now dark energy may cluster. We speculate that this can lead to a possibility of distinguishing the models at the non-linear perturbative level.
  • We consider cosmological scenarios based on $f(R,T)$ theories of gravity ($R$ is the Ricci scalar and $T$ is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor) and numerically reconstruct the function $f(R,T)$ which is able to reproduce the same expansion history generated, in the standard General Relativity theory, by dark matter and holographic dark energy. We consider two special $f(R,T)$ models: in the first instance, we investigate the modification $R + 2f(T)$, i.e. the usual Einstein-Hilbert term plus a $f(T)$ correction. In the second instance, we consider a $f(R)+\lambda T$ theory, i.e. a $T$ correction to the renown $f(R)$ theory of gravity.
  • We present an analysis of the cross-correlation between the CMB and the large-scale structure (LSS) of the Universe in Unified Dark Matter (UDM) scalar field cosmologies. We work out the predicted cross-correlation function in UDM models, which depends on the speed of sound of the unified component, and compare it with observations from six galaxy catalogues (NVSS, HEAO, 2MASS, and SDSS main galaxies, luminous red galaxies, and quasars). We sample the value of the speed of sound and perform a likelihood analysis, finding that the UDM model is as likely as the LambdaCDM, and is compatible with observations for a range of values of c_\infinity (the value of the sound speed at late times) on which structure formation depends. In particular, we obtain an upper bound of c_\infinity^2 \leq 0.009 at 95% confidence level, meaning that the LambdaCDM model, for which c_\infinity^2 = 0, is a good fit to the data, while the posterior probability distribution peaks at the value c_\infinity^2=10^(-4) . Finally, we study the time dependence of the deviation from LambdaCDM via a tomographic analysis using a mock redshift distribution and we find that the largest deviation is for low-redshift sources, suggesting that future low-z surveys will be best suited to constrain UDM models.
  • We consider cosmological scenarios originating from a single imperfect fluid with bulk viscosity and apply Eckart's and both the full and the truncated M\"uller-Israel-Stewart's theories as descriptions of the non-equilibrium processes. Our principal objective is to investigate if the dynamical properties of Dark Matter and Dark Energy can be described by a single viscous fluid and how such description changes when a causal theory (M\"uller-Israel-Stewart's, both in its full and truncated forms) is taken into account instead of Eckart's non-causal theory. To this purpose, we find numerical solutions for the gravitational potential and compare its behaviour with the corresponding LambdaCDM case. Eckart's and the full causal theory seem to be disfavoured, whereas the truncated theory leads to results similar to those of the LambdaCDM model for a bulk viscous speed in the interval 10^{-11} << c_b^2 < 10^{-8}. Tentatively relating such value to a square propagation velocity of the order of T/m of perturbations in a non-relativistic gas of particles with mass m at the epoch of matter-radiation equality, this may be compatible with a mass range 0.1 GeV < m << 100 GeV.