• We consider the frequency domain form of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) called spectral proper orthogonal decomposition (SPOD). Spectral POD is derived from a space-time POD problem for statistically stationary flows and leads to modes that each oscillate at a single frequency. This form of POD goes back to the original work of Lumley (Stochastic tools in turbulence, Academic Press, 1970), but has been overshadowed by a space-only form of POD since the 1990s. We clarify the relationship between these two forms of POD and show that SPOD modes represent structures that evolve coherently in space and time while space-only POD modes in general do not. We also establish a relationship between SPOD and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD); we show that SPOD modes are in fact optimally averaged DMD modes obtained from an ensemble DMD problem for stationary flows. Accordingly, SPOD modes represent structures that are dynamic in the same sense as DMD modes but also optimally account for the statistical variability of turbulent flows. Finally, we establish a connection between SPOD and resolvent analysis. The key observation is that the resolvent-mode expansion coefficients must be regarded as statistical quantities to ensure convergent approximations of the flow statistics. When the expansion coefficients are uncorrelated, we show that SPOD and resolvent modes are identical. Our theoretical results and the overall utility of SPOD are demonstrated using two example problems: the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation and a turbulent jet.
  • A streaming algorithm to compute the spectral proper orthogonal decomposition (SPOD) of stationary random processes is presented. As new data becomes available, an incremental update of the truncated eigenbasis of the estimated cross-spectral density (CSD) matrix is performed. The algorithm converges orthogonal sets of SPOD modes at discrete frequencies that are optimally ranked in terms of energy. We define measures of error and convergence, and demonstrate the algorithm's performance on two datasets. The first example is that of a high-fidelity numerical simulation of a turbulent jet, and the second optical flow data obtained from high-speed camera recordings of a stepped spillway experiment. For both cases, the most energetic SPOD modes are reliably converged. The algorithm's low memory requirement enable real-time deployment and allow for the convergence of second-order statistics from arbitrarily long streams of data.
  • Simple aerodynamic configurations under even modest conditions can exhibit complex flows with a wide range of temporal and spatial features. It has become common practice in the analysis of these flows to look for and extract physically important features, or modes, as a first step in the analysis. This step typically starts with a modal decomposition of an experimental or numerical dataset of the flow field, or of an operator relevant to the system. We describe herein some of the dominant techniques for accomplishing these modal decompositions and analyses that have seen a surge of activity in recent decades. For a non-expert, keeping track of recent developments can be daunting, and the intent of this document is to provide an introduction to modal analysis that is accessible to the larger fluid dynamics community. In particular, we present a brief overview of several of the well-established techniques and clearly lay the framework of these methods using familiar linear algebra. The modal analysis techniques covered in this paper include the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), balanced proper orthogonal decomposition (Balanced POD), dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), Koopman analysis, global linear stability analysis, and resolvent analysis.