• Minimum energy paths for transitions such as atomic and/or spin rearrangements in thermalized systems are the transition paths of largest statistical weight. Such paths are frequently calculated using the nudged elastic band method, where an initial path is iteratively shifted to the nearest minimum energy path. The computational effort can be large, especially when ab initio or electron density functional calculations are used to evaluate the energy and atomic forces. Here, we show how the number of such evaluations can be reduced by an order of magnitude using a Gaussian process regression approach where an approximate energy surface is generated and refined in each iteration. When the goal is to evaluate the transition rate within harmonic transition state theory, the evaluation of the Hessian matrix at the initial and final state minima can be carried out beforehand and used as input in the minimum energy path calculation, thereby improving stability and reducing the number of iterations needed for convergence. A Gaussian process model also provides an uncertainty estimate for the approximate energy surface, and this can be used to focus the calculations on the lesser-known part of the path, thereby reducing the number of needed energy and force evaluations to a half in the present calculations. The methodology is illustrated using the two-dimensional M\"uller-Brown potential surface and performance assessed on an established benchmark involving 13 rearrangement transitions of a heptamer island on a solid surface.
  • The calculation of minimum energy paths for transitions such as atomic and/or spin re-arrangements is an important task in many contexts and can often be used to determine the mechanism and rate of transitions. An important challenge is to reduce the computational effort in such calculations, especially when ab initio or electron density functional calculations are used to evaluate the energy since they can require large computational effort. Gaussian process regression is used here to reduce significantly the number of energy evaluations needed to find minimum energy paths of atomic rearrangements. By using results of previous calculations to construct an approximate energy surface and then converge to the minimum energy path on that surface in each Gaussian process iteration, the number of energy evaluations is reduced significantly as compared with regular nudged elastic band calculations. For a test problem involving rearrangements of a heptamer island on a crystal surface, the number of energy evaluations is reduced to less than a fifth. The scaling of the computational effort with the number of degrees of freedom as well as various possible further improvements to this approach are discussed.