• The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) standard has been a great boon to astronomy, allowing observatories, scientists and the public to exchange astronomical information easily. The FITS standard, however, is showing its age. Developed in the late 1970s, the FITS authors made a number of implementation choices that, while common at the time, are now seen to limit its utility with modern data. The authors of the FITS standard could not anticipate the challenges which we are facing today in astronomical computing. Difficulties we now face include, but are not limited to, addressing the need to handle an expanded range of specialized data product types (data models), being more conducive to the networked exchange and storage of data, handling very large datasets, and capturing significantly more complex metadata and data relationships. There are members of the community today who find some or all of these limitations unworkable, and have decided to move ahead with storing data in other formats. If this fragmentation continues, we risk abandoning the advantages of broad interoperability, and ready archivability, that the FITS format provides for astronomy. In this paper we detail some selected important problems which exist within the FITS standard today. These problems may provide insight into deeper underlying issues which reside in the format and we provide a discussion of some lessons learned. It is not our intention here to prescribe specific remedies to these issues; rather, it is to call attention of the FITS and greater astronomical computing communities to these problems in the hope that it will spur action to address them.
  • Iris is an extensible application that provides astronomers with a user-friendly interface capable of ingesting broad-band data from many different sources in order to build, explore, and model spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Iris takes advantage of the standards defined by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance, but hides the technicalities of such standards by implementing different layers of abstraction on top of them. Such intermediate layers provide hooks that users and developers can exploit in order to extend the capabilities provided by Iris. For instance, custom Python models can be combined in arbitrary ways with the Iris built-in models or with other custom functions. As such, Iris offers a platform for the development and integration of SED data, services, and applications, either from the user's system or from the web. In this paper we describe the built-in features provided by Iris for building and analyzing SEDs. We also explore in some detail the Iris framework and software development kit, showing how astronomers and software developers can plug their code into an integrated SED analysis environment.
  • The U.S. Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) is a product-driven organization that provides new scientific research capabilities to the astronomical community. Software development for the VAO follows a lightweight framework that guides development of science applications and infrastructure. Challenges to be overcome include distributed development teams, part-time efforts, and highly constrained schedules. We describe the process we followed to conquer these challenges while developing Iris, the VAO application for analysis of 1-D astronomical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Iris was successfully built and released in less than a year with a team distributed across four institutions. The project followed existing International Virtual Observatory Alliance inter-operability standards for spectral data and contributed a SED library as a by-product of the project. We emphasize lessons learned that will be folded into future development efforts. In our experience, a well-defined process that provides guidelines to ensure the project is cohesive and stays on track is key to success. Internal product deliveries with a planned test and feedback loop are critical. Release candidates are measured against use cases established early in the process, and provide the opportunity to assess priorities and make course corrections during development. Also key is the participation of a stakeholder such as a lead scientist who manages the technical questions, advises on priorities, and is actively involved as a lead tester. Finally, frequent scheduled communications (for example a bi-weekly tele-conference) assure issues are resolved quickly and the team is working toward a common vision
  • We present Iris, the VAO (Virtual Astronomical Observatory) application for analyzing SEDs (spectral energy distributions). Iris is the result of one of the major science initiatives of the VAO, and the first version was released in September 2011. Iris combines key features of several existing software applications to streamline and enhance SED analysis. With Iris, users may read and display SEDs, select data ranges for analysis, fit models to SEDs, and calculate confidence limits on best-fit parameters. SED data may be uploaded into the application from IVOA-compliant VOTable and FITS format files, or retrieved directly from NED. Data written in unsupported formats may be converted using SedImporter, a new application provided with Iris. The components of Iris have been contributed by members of the VAO. Specview, contributed by STScI, provides a GUI for reading, editing, and displaying SEDs, as well as defining models and parameter values. Sherpa, contributed by the Chandra project at SAO, provides a library of models, fit statistics, and optimization methods; the underlying I/O library, SEDLib, is a VAO product written by SAO to current IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) data model standards. NED is a service provided by IPAC for easy location of data for a given extragalactic source, including SEDs. SedImporter is a new tool for converting non-standard SED data files into a format supported by Iris. We demonstrate the use of SedImporter to retrieve SEDs from a variety of sources--from the NED SED service, from the user's own data, and from other VO applications using SAMP (Simple Application Messaging Protocol). We also demonstrate the use of Iris to read, display, select ranges from, and fit models to SEDs. Finally, we discuss the architecture of Iris, and the use of IVOA standards so that Specview, Sherpa, SEDLib and SedImporter work together seamlessly.
  • We present a data model describing the structure of spectrophotometric datasets with spectral and temporal coordinates and associated metadata. This data model may be used to represent spectra, time series data, segments of SED (Spectral Energy Distributions) and other spectral or temporal associations.
  • With the availability of the huge amounts of data produced by current and future large multi-band photometric surveys, photometric redshifts have become a crucial tool for extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. In this paper we present a novel method, called Weak Gated Experts (WGE), which allows to derive photometric redshifts through a combination of data mining techniques. \noindent The WGE, like many other machine learning techniques, is based on the exploitation of a spectroscopic knowledge base composed by sources for which a spectroscopic value of the redshift is available. This method achieves a variance \sigma^2(\Delta z)=2.3x10^{-4} (\sigma^2(\Delta z) =0.08), where \Delta z = z_{phot} - z_{spec}) for the reconstruction of the photometric redshifts for the optical galaxies from the SDSS and for the optical quasars respectively, while the Root Mean Square (RMS) of the \Delta z variable distributions for the two experiments is respectively equal to 0.021 and 0.35. The WGE provides also a mechanism for the estimation of the accuracy of each photometric redshift. We also present and discuss the catalogs obtained for the optical SDSS galaxies, for the optical candidate quasars extracted from the DR7 SDSS photometric dataset {The sample of SDSS sources on which the accuracy of the reconstruction has been assessed is composed of bright sources, for a subset of which spectroscopic redshifts have been measured.}, and for optical SDSS candidate quasars observed by GALEX in the UV range. The WGE method exploits the new technological paradigm provided by the Virtual Observatory and the emerging field of Astroinformatics.
  • Nowadays, many scientific areas share the same need of being able to deal with massive and distributed datasets and to perform on them complex knowledge extraction tasks. This simple consideration is behind the international efforts to build virtual organizations such as, for instance, the Virtual Observatory (VObs). DAME (DAta Mining & Exploration) is an innovative, general purpose, Web-based, VObs compliant, distributed data mining infrastructure specialized in Massive Data Sets exploration with machine learning methods. Initially fine tuned to deal with astronomical data only, DAME has evolved in a general purpose platform which has found applications also in other domains of human endeavor. We present the products and a short outline of a science case, together with a detailed description of main features available in the beta release of the web application now released.