• Excitonic insulators are insulating states formed by the coherent condensation of electron and hole pairs into BCS-like states. Isotropic spatial wave functions are commonly considered for excitonic condensates since the attractive interaction among the electrons and the holes in semiconductors usually leads to $s$-wave excitons. Here, we propose a new type of excitonic insulator that exhibits order parameter with $p+ip$ symmetry and is characterized by a chiral Chern number $C_\textrm{c}=1/2$. This state displays the parity anomaly, which results in two novel topological properties: fractionalized excitations with $\textrm{e}/2$ charge at defects and a spontaneous in-plane magnetization. The topological insulator surface state is a promising platform to realize the topological excitonic insulator. With the spin-momentum locking, the interband optical pumping can renormalize the surface electrons and drive the system towards the proposed $p+ip$ instability.
  • Our understanding of correlated electron systems is vexed by the complexity of their interactions. Heavy fermion compounds are archetypal examples of this physics, leading to exotic properties that weave together magnetism, superconductivity and strange metal behavior. The Kondo semimetal CeSb is an unusual example where different channels of interaction not only coexist, but their physical signatures are coincident, leading to decades of debate about the microscopic picture describing the interactions between the $f$ moments and the itinerant electron sea. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we resonantly enhance the response of the Ce$f$-electrons across the magnetic transitions of CeSb and find there are two distinct modes of interaction that are simultaneously active, but on different kinds of carriers. This study is a direct visualization of how correlated systems can reconcile the coexistence of different modes on interaction - by separating their action in momentum space, they allow their coexistence in real space.
  • We study the response of the antiferromagnetism of CeAuSb$_2$ to orthorhombic lattice distortion applied through in-plane uniaxial pressure. The response to pressure applied along a $\langle 110 \rangle$ lattice direction shows a first-order transition at zero pressure, which shows that the magnetic order lifts the $(110)/(1\bar{1}0)$ symmetry of the unstressed lattice. Sufficient $\langle 100 \rangle$ pressure appears to rotate the principal axes of the order from $\langle 110 \rangle$ to $\langle 100 \rangle$. At low $\langle 100 \rangle$ pressure, the transition at $T_N$ is weakly first-order, however it becomes continuous above a threshold $\langle 100 \rangle$ pressure. We discuss the possibility that this behavior is driven by order parameter fluctuations, with the restoration of a continuous transition a result of reducing the point-group symmetry of the lattice.
  • Magnetic exchange in Kondo lattice systems is of the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida type, whose sign depends on the Fermi wave vector, $k_F$ . In the simplest setting, for small $k_F$ , the interaction is predominately ferromagnetic, whereas it turns more antiferromagnetic with growing $k_F$. It is remarkable that even though $k_F$ varies vastly among the rare-earth systems, an overwhelming majority of lanthanide magnets are in fact antiferromagnets. To address this puzzle, we investigate the effects of a p-wave form factor for the Kondo coupling pertinent to nearly all rare-earth intermetallics. We show that this leads to interference effects which for small kF are destructive, greatly reducing the size of the RKKY interaction in the cases where ferromagnetism would otherwise be strongest. By contrast, for large $k_F$, constructive interference can enhance antiferromagnetic exchange. Based on this, we propose a new route for designing ferromagnetic rare-earth magnets.
  • Heavy fermion materials have recently attracted attention for their potential to combine topological protection with strongly correlated electron physics. To date, the ideas of topological protection have been restricted to the heavy fermion or "Kondo" insulators with the simplest point-group symmetries. Here we argue that the presence of nonsymmorphic crystal symmetries in many heavy fermion materials opens up a new family of topologically protected heavy electron systems. Re-examination of archival resistivity measurements in nonsymmorphic heavy fermion insulators Ce$_3$Bi$_4$Pt$_3$ and CeNiSn reveals the presence of low temperature conductivity plateau, making them candidate members of the new class of material. We illustrate our ideas with a specific model for CeNiSn, showing how glide symmetries generate surface states with a novel Mobius braiding that can be detected by ARPES or non-local conductivity measurements. One of the interesting effects of strong correlation, is the development of partially localization or "Kondo breakdown" on the surfaces, which transforms Mobius surface states into quasi-one dimensional conductors, with the potential for novel electronic phase transitions.
  • Current theories of superfluidity are based on the idea of a coherent quantum state with topologically protected, quantized circulation. When this topological protection is absent, as in the case of $^3$He-A, the coherent quantum state no longer supports persistent superflow. Here we argue that the loss of topological protection in a superconductor gives rise to an insulating ground state. We specifically introduce the concept of a Skyrme insulator to describe the coherent dielectric state that results from the topological failure of superflow carried by a complex vector order parameter. We apply this idea to the case of SmB$_6$, arguing that the observation of a diamagnetic Fermi surface within an insulating bulk can be understood in terms of a Skyrme insulator. Our theory enables us to understand the linear specific heat of SmB$_6$ in terms of a neutral Majorana Fermi sea and leads us to predict that in low fields of order a Gauss, SmB6 will develop a Meissner effect.
  • Recent quantum oscillation experiments on SmB$_6$ pose a paradox, for while the angular dependence of the oscillation frequencies suggest a 3D bulk Fermi surface, SmB$_6$ remains robustly insulating to very high magnetic fields. Moreover, a sudden low temperature upturn in the amplitude of the oscillations raises the possibility of quantum criticality. Here we discuss recently proposed mechanisms for this effect, contrasting bulk and surface scenarios. We argue that topological surface states permit us to reconcile the various data with bulk transport and spectroscopy measurements, interpreting the low temperature upturn in the quantum oscillation amplitudes as a result of surface Kondo breakdown and the high frequency oscillations as large topologically protected orbits around the X point. We discuss various predictions that can be used to test this theory.
  • Motivated by the observation of light surface states in SmB6, we examine the effects of surface Kondo breakdown in topological Kondo insulators. We present both numerical and analytic results which show that the decoupling of the localized moments at the surface disturbs the compensation between light and heavy electrons and dopes the Dirac cone. Dispersion of these uncompensated surface states are dominated by inter-site hopping, which leads to a much lighter quasiparticles. These surface states are also highly durable against the effects of surface magnetism and decreasing thickness of the sample.
  • The recent observation of fully-gapped superconductivity in Yb doped CeCoIn5 poses a paradox, for the disappearance of nodes suggests that they are accidental, yet d-wave symmetry with protected nodes is we ll established by experiment. Here, we show that composite pairing provides a natural resolution: in this scenario, Yb doping drives a Lifshitz transition of the nodal Fermi surface, forming a fully-gapped d-wave molecular superfluid of composite pairs. The T4 dependence of the penetration depth associated with the sound mode of this condensate is in accord with observation.
  • Recent developments have led to an explosion of activity on skyrmions in three-dimensional (3D) chiral magnets. Experiments have directly probed these topological spin textures, revealed their nontrivial properties, and led to suggestions for novel applications. However, in 3D the skyrmion crystal phase is observed only in a narrow region of the temperature-field phase diagram. We show here, using a general analysis based on symmetry, that skyrmions are much more readily stabilized in two-dimensional (2D) systems with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. This enhanced stability arises from the competition between field and easy-plane magnetic anisotropy and results in a nontrivial structure in the topological charge density in the core of the skyrmions. We further show that, in a variety of microscopic models for magnetic exchange, the required easy-plane anisotropy naturally arises from the same spin-orbit coupling that is responsible for the chiral Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Our results are of particular interest for 2D materials like thin films, surfaces, and oxide interfaces, where broken surface-inversion symmetry and Rashba spin-orbit coupling naturally lead to chiral exchange and easy-plane compass anisotropy. Our theory gives a clear direction for experimental studies of 2D magnetic materials to stabilize skyrmions over a large range of magnetic fields down to T=0.
  • The double perovskite material \SFMO has the rare and desirable combination of a half-metallic ground state with 100% spin polarization and ferrimagnetic \Tc$\simeq 420$K, well above room temperature. In this two-part paper, we present a comprehensive theoretical study of the magnetic and electronic properties of half metallic double perovskites. In this paper we present exact diagonalization calculations of the "fast" Mo electronic degrees coupled to "slow" Fe core spin fluctuations treated by classical Monte Carlo techniques. From the temperature dependence of the spin-resolved density of states, we show that the electronic polarization at the chemical potential is proportional to magnetization as a function of temperature. We also consider the effects of disorder and show that excess Fe leaves the ground state half-metallic while anti-site disorder greatly reduces the polarization. In a companion paper titled "Theory of Half-Metallic Double Perovskites II: Effective Spin Hamiltonian and Disorder Effects", we derive an effective classical spin Hamiltonian that provides a new framework for understanding the magnetic properties of half-metallic double perovskites including the effects of disorder. Our results on the dependence of the spin polarization on temperature and disorder has important implications for spintronics.
  • Double perovskites like Sr$_2$FeMoO$_6$ are materials with half-metallic ground states and ferrimagnetic T$_{\rm{c}}$'s well above room temperature. This paper is the second of our comprehensive theory for half metallic double perovskites. Here we derive an effective Hamiltonian for the Fe core spins by "integrating out" the itinerant Mo electrons and obtain an unusual double square-root form of the spin-spin interaction. We validate the classical spin Hamiltonian by comparing its results with those of the full quantum treatment presented in the companion paper "Theory of Half-Metallic Double Perovskites I: Double Exchange Mechanism". We then use the effective Hamiltonian to compute magnetic properties as a function of temperature and disorder and discuss the effect of excess Mo, excess Fe, and anti-site disorder on the magnetization and T$_{\rm{c}}$. We conclude with a proposal to increase T$_{\rm{c}}$ without sacrificing carrier polarization.
  • The electronic properties of the polar interface between insulating oxides is a subject of great current interest. An exciting new development is the observation of robust magnetism at the interface of two non-magnetic materials LaAlO_3 (LAO) and SrTiO_3 (STO). Here we present a microscopic theory for the formation and interaction of local moments, which depends on essential features of the LAO/STO interface. We show that correlation-induced moments arise due to interfacial splitting of orbital degeneracy. We find that gate-tunable Rashba spin-orbit coupling at the interface influences the exchange interaction mediated by conduction electrons. We predict that the zero-field ground state is a long-wavelength spiral and show that its evolution in an external field accounts semi-quantitatively for torque magnetometry data. Our theory describes qualitative aspects of the scanning SQUID measurements and makes several testable predictions for future experiments.
  • We propose a model for the multi-orbital material Sr$_2$CrOsO$_6$ (SCOO), an insulator with remarkable magnetic properties and the highest $T_c \simeq 725$ K among {\em all} perovskites with a net moment. We derive a new criterion for the Mott transition $(\widetilde{U}_{1} \widetilde{U}_{2})^{1/2}>2.5W$ using slave rotor mean field theory, where $W$ is the bandwidth and $\widetilde{U}_{1(2)}$ are the effective Coulomb interactions on Cr(Os) including Hund's coupling. We show that SCOO is a Mott insulator, where the large Cr $\widetilde{U}_{1}$ compensates for the small Os $\widetilde{U}_{2}$. The spin sector is described by a frustrated antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model that naturally explains the net moment arising from canting and also the observed non-monotonic magnetization $M(T)$. We predict characteristic magnetic structure factor peaks that can be probed by neutron experiments.
  • We present a comprehensive theory of the temperature- and disorder-dependence of half-metallic ferrimagnetism in the double perovskite Sr$_2$FeMoO$_6$ (SFMO) with $T_c$ above room temperature. We show that the magnetization $M(T)$ and conduction electron polarization $P(T)$ are both proportional to the magnetization $M_S(T)$ of localized Fe spins. We derive and validate an effective spin Hamiltonian, amenable to large-scale three-dimensional simulations. We show how $M(T)$ and $T_c$ are affected by disorder, ubiquitous in these materials. We suggest a way to enhance $T_c$ in SFMO without sacrificing polarization.