• We present in detail the convolutional neural network used in our previous work to detect cosmic strings in cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropy maps. By training this neural network on numerically generated CMB temperature maps, with and without cosmic strings, the network can produce prediction maps that locate the position of the cosmic strings and provide a probabilistic estimate of the value of the string tension $G\mu$. Supplying noiseless simulations of CMB maps with arcmin resolution to the network resulted in the accurate determination both of string locations and string tension for sky maps having strings with string tension as low as $G\mu=5\times10^{-9}$. The code is publicly available online. Though we trained the network with a long straight string toy model, we show the network performs well with realistic Nambu-Goto simulations.
  • There exists various proposals to detect cosmic strings from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) or 21 cm temperature maps. Current proposals do not aim to find the location of strings on sky maps, all of these approaches can be thought of as a statistic on a sky map. We propose a Bayesian interpretation of cosmic string detection and within that framework, we derive a connection between estimates of cosmic string locations and cosmic string tension $G\mu$. We use this Bayesian framework to develop a machine learning framework for detecting strings from sky maps and outline how to implement this framework with neural networks. The neural network we trained was able to detect and locate cosmic strings on noiseless CMB temperature map down to a string tension of $G\mu=5 \times10^{-9}$ and when analyzing a CMB temperature map that does not contain strings, the neural network gives a 0.95 probability that $G\mu\leq2.3\times10^{-9}$.
  • We study the stability of cosmic string wakes against the disruption by the dominant Gaussian fluctuations which are present in cosmological models. We find that for a string tension given by $G \mu = 10^{-7}$ wakes remain locally stable until a redshift of $z = 6$, and for a value of $G \mu = 10^{-14}$ they are stable beyond a redshift of $z = 20$. We study a global stability criterion which shows that wakes created by strings at times after $t_{eq}$ are identifiable up to the present time, independent of the value of $G \mu$. Taking into account our criteria it is possible to develop strategies to search for the distinctive position space signals in cosmological maps which are induced by wakes.
  • Massive neutrinos leave a unique signature in the large scale clustering of matter. We investigate the wavenumber dependence of the growth factor arising from neutrino masses and use a Fisher analysis to determine the aspects of a galaxy survey needed to measure this scale dependence.
  • The baryon density enhancement in cosmic string wakes leads to a stronger coupling of the spin temperature to the gas kinetic temperate inside these string wakes than in the intergalactic medium (IGM). The Wouthuysen Field (WF) effect has the potential to enhance this coupling to such an extent that it may result in the strongest and cleanest cosmic string signature in the currently planned radio telescope projects. Here we consider this enhancement under the assumption that X-ray heating is not significant. We show that the size of this effect in a cosmic string wake leads to a brightness temperature at least two times more negative than in the surrounding IGM. If the SCI-HI [1, 2] or EDGES [3, 4] experiment confirm a WF absorption trough in the cosmic gas, then cosmic string wakes should appear clearly in 21 cm redshift surveys of z = 10 to 30.
  • The analysis of the 21 cm signature of cosmic string wakes is extended in several ways. First we consider the constraints on $G\mu$ from the absorption signal of shock heated wakes laid down much later than matter radiation equality. Secondly we analyze the signal of diffuse wake, that is those wakes in which there is a baryon overdensity but which have not shock heated. Finally we compare the size of these signals compared to the expected thermal noise per pixel which dominates over the background cosmic gas brightness temperature and find that the cosmic string signal will exceed the thermal noise of an individual pixel in the Square Kilometre Array for string tensions $G\mu > 2.5 \times 10^{-8}$.
  • Cosmic string wakes lead to a large signal in 21 cm redshift maps at redshifts larger than that corresponding to reionization. Here, we compute the angular power spectrum of 21 cm radiation as predicted by a scaling distribution of cosmic strings whose wakes have undergone shock heating.
  • An anisotropic power spectrum will have a clear signature in the 21cm radiation from high-redshift hydrogen. We calculate the expected power spectrum of the intensity fluctuations in neutral hydrogen from before the epoch of reionization, and predict the accuracy to which future experiments could constrain a quadrupole anisotropy in the power spectrum. We find that the Square Kilometer Array will have marginal detection abilities for this signal at z~17 if the process of reionization has not yet started; reionization could enhance the detectability substantially. Pushing to higher redshifts and higher sensitivity will allow highly precise (percent level) measurements of anisotropy.
  • The standard-model explanations of the anomalously-large transverse polarization fraction fT in B -> phi K* can be tested by measuring the polarizations of the two decays B+ -> rho+ K*0 and B+ -> rho0 K*+. For the scenario in which the transverse polarizations of both B -> rho K* decays are predicted to be large, we derive a simple relation between the fT's of these decays. If this relation is not confirmed experimentally, this would yield an unambiguous signal for new physics. The new-physics operators which can account for the discrepancy in B -> pi K decays will also contribute to the polarization states of B -> rho K*. We compute these contributions and show that there are only two operators which can simultaneously account for the present B -> pi K and B -> rho K* data. If the new physics obeys an approximate U-spin symmetry, the B -> phi K* measurements can also be explained.
  • Traditional textbook explanations of the Compton effect treat the photon electron interaction as a particle collision. This explanation is a pedagogical disaster, implying that sometimes interactions are particle-like whereas quantum mechanics always demands that they be wave-like; a photon wavefunction evolves according to a wave equation until its collapse at measurement. If this is so why then does the classical radiation wave equation fail to predict the Compton effect? We address these issues and propose a clearer explanation.
  • We present the non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) prediction for the polarization of the J-Psi produced in b to J-Psi + X, as well as the helicity-summed production rate. We propose that these observables provide a means of measuring the three most important color-octet NRQCD matrix elements involved in J-Psi production. Anticipating the measurement of the polarization parameter alpha, we determine its expected range given current experimental bounds on the color-octet matrix elements.
  • Production of rare particles within rapidity gaps has been proposed as a background-free signal for the detection of new physics at hadron colliders. No complete formalism accounts for such processes yet. We study a simple lowest-order QCD model for their description. Concentrating on Higgs production, we show that the calculation of the cross section pp -> pp H can be embedded into existing models which successfully account for diffractive data. We extend those models to take into account single and double diffractive cross sections pp -> H X1 X2 with a gap between the fragments X1 and X2. Using conservative scenarios, we evaluate the uncertainties in our calculation, and study the dependence of the cross section on the gap width. We predict that Higgs production within a gap of 4 units of rapidity is about 0.3 pb for a 100 GeV Higgs at the Tevatron, and almost 2 pb for a 400 GeV Higgs within a gap of 6 units at the LHC with 14 TeV beams.
  • The decays of $B$ mesons to two-body hadronic final states are analyzed within the context of broken flavor SU(3) symmetry, extending a previous analysis involving pairs of light pseudoscalars to decays involving one or two charmed quarks in the final state. A systematic program is described for learning information {}from decay rates regarding (i) SU(3)-violating contributions, (ii) the magnitude of exchange and annihilation diagrams (effects involving the spectator quark), and (iii) strong final-state interactions. The implication of SU(3)-breaking effects for the extraction of weak phases is also examined. The present status of data on these questions is reviewed and suggestions for further experimental study are made.
  • We discuss the role of electroweak penguins in $B$ decays to two light pseudoscalar mesons. We confirm that the extraction of the weak phase $\alpha$ through the isospin analysis involving $B\to\pi\pi$ decays is largely unaffected by such operators. However, the methods proposed to obtain weak and strong phases by relating $B\to\pi\pi$, $B\to\pi K$ and $B\to KK$ decays through flavor SU(3) will be invalidated if electroweak penguins are large. We show that, although the introduction of electroweak penguin contributions introduces no new amplitudes of flavor SU(3), there are a number of ways to experimentally measure the size of such effects. Finally, using SU(3) amplitude relations we present a new way of measuring the weak angle $\gamma$ which holds even in the presence of electroweak penguins.
  • After a short introduction to the SM picture of CP violation, we discuss recent work on how to use SU(3) flavor symmetry, along with some dynamical approximations, to extract the CKM weak phases and the strong rescattering phases from experimental measurements alone. This suprising wealth of information depends on our two strongest assumptions: SU(3) invariance, and the relative unimportance of exhange and annihilation diagrams. We discuss soon to be measured decay rate measurements that will test the validity of these assumptions.
  • We present the current wisdom regarding the measurement of the CP-violating phases of the CKM unitarity triangle in $B$-meson decays. After an introduction to the SM picture of CP violation, we review direct and indirect CP violation, the role of penguins and isospin analysis, and $B\to DK$ decays. We also discuss recent work on how to use SU(3) flavor symmetry, along with some dynamical approximations, to get at the CKM weak phases. Through time-independent $B$-decay measurements alone, we show that it is possible to extract all information: the weak phases, the incalculable strong phase shifts, and the sizes of the tree, color-suppressed, and penguin contributions to these decays.
  • Lattice calculations of matrix elements involving heavy-light quark bilinears are of interest in calculating a variety of properties of B and D mesons, including decay constants and mixing parameters. A large source of uncertainty in the determination of these properties has been uncertainty in the normalization of the lattice-regularized operators that appear in the matrix elements. Tadpole-improved perturbation theory, as formulated by Lepage and Mackenzie, promises to reduce these uncertainties below the ten per cent level at one-loop. In this paper we study this proposal as it applies to lattice-regularized heavy-light operators. We consider both the commonly used zero-distance bilinear and the distance-one point-split operator. A self-contained section on the application of these results is included. The calculation reduces the value of $f_B$ obtained from lattice calculations using the heavy quark effective theory.
  • Flavor SU(3) symmetry implies certain relations among $B$-decay amplitudes to $\pi\pi$, $\pi K$ and $K {\bar K}$ final states, when annihilation-like diagrams are neglected. Using three triangle relations, we show how to measure the weak CKM phases $\alpha$ and $\gamma$ using time-independent rate measurements only. In addition, one obtains all the strong final-state phases and the magnitudes of individual terms describing tree (spectator), color-suppressed and penguin diagrams. Many independent measurements of these quantities can be made with this method, which helps to eliminate possible discrete ambiguities and to estimate the size of SU(3)-breaking effects.
  • The decays $B \to PP$, where $P$ denotes a pseudoscalar meson, are analyzed, with emphasis on charmless final states. Numerous triangle relations for amplitudes hold within SU(3) symmetry, relating (for example) the decays $B^+ \to \pi^+ \pi^0,~ \pi^0 K^+$, and $\pi^+ K^0$. Such relations can improve the possibilities for early detection of $CP$-violating asymmetries. Within the context of a graphical analysis of decays, relations are analyzed among SU(3) amplitudes which hold if some graphs are neglected. One application is that measurements of the rates for the above three $B^+$ decays and their charge-conjugates can be used to determine a weak CKM phase. With measurements of the remaining rates for $B$ decays to $\pi \pi,~\pi K$, and $K \bar K$, one can obtain two CKM phases and several differences of strong phase shifts.
  • The matrix element which determines the B meson decay constant can be measured on the lattice using an effective field theory for heavy quarks. Various discretizations of the heavy-light bilinears which appear in this and other B decay matrix elements are possible. The heavy-light bilinear currently used for the determination of the B meson decay constant on the lattice suffers a substantial one-loop renormalization. In this paper, we compute the one-loop renormalizations of the discretizations in which the heavy and light fields in the bilinear are separated by one lattice spacing, and discuss their application. Readers of this paper may also be interested in our paper on the application of Symanzik's improvement program to heavy-light currents (paper number 9203221 on hep-ph).
  • It is hoped that the accuracy of a variety of lattice calculations will be improved by perturbatively eliminating effects proportional to the lattice spacing. In this paper, we apply this improvement program to the heavy quark effective theory currents which cause a heavy quark to decay to a light quark, and renormalize the resulting operators to order $\alphaS$. We find a small decrease in the amount that the operator needs to be renormalized, relative to the unimproved case.
  • We present a class of models in which the top quark, by mixing with new physics at a higher energy scale, is naturally heavier than the other standard model particles. We take this new physics to be extended color. Our models contain new particles with masses between 100 GeV and 1 TeV, some of which may be just within the reach of the next generation of experiments. In particular one of our models implies the existence of two right handed top quarks. These models demonstrate the existence of a standard model-like theory consistent with experiment, and leading to new physics below the TeV scale, in which the third generation is treated differently than the first two.