• We introduce a model of one-way language acceptors (a variant of a checking stack automaton) and show the following decidability properties: (1) The deterministic version has a decidable membership problem but has an undecidable emptiness problem. (2) The nondeterministic version has an undecidable membership problem and emptiness problem. There are many models of accepting devices for which there is no difference with these problems between deterministic and nondeterministic versions, and the same holds for the emptiness problem. As far as we know, the model we introduce above is the first one-way model to exhibit properties (1) and (2). We define another family of one-way acceptors where the nondeterministic version has an undecidable emptiness problem, but the deterministic version has a decidable emptiness problem. We also know of no other model with this property in the literature. We also investigate decidability properties of other variations of checking stack automata (e.g., allowing multiple stacks, two-way input, etc.). Surprisingly, two-way deterministic machines with multiple checking stacks and multiple reversal-bounded counters are shown to have a decidable membership problem, a very general model with this property.
  • It is well known that the "store language" of every pushdown automaton -- the set of store configurations (state and stack contents) that can appear as an intermediate step in accepting computations -- is a regular language. Here many models of language acceptors with various data structures are examined, along with a study of their store languages. For each model, an attempt is made to find the simplest model that accepts their store languages. Some connections between store languages of one-way and two-way machines generally are demonstrated, as with connections between nondeterministic and deterministic machines. A nice application of these store language results is also presented, showing a general technique for proving families accepted by many deterministic models are closed under right quotient with regular languages, resolving some open questions (and significantly simplifying proofs for others that are known) in the literature. Lower bounds on the space complexity for recognizing store languages for the languages to be non-regular are obtained.
  • The complexity and decidability of various decision problems involving the shuffle operation are studied. The following three problems are all shown to be $NP$-complete: given a nondeterministic finite automaton (NFA) $M$, and two words $u$ and $v$, is $L(M)$ not a subset of $u$ shuffled with $v$, is $u$ shuffled with $v$ not a subset of $L(M)$, and is $L(M)$ not equal to $u$ shuffled with $v$? It is also shown that there is a polynomial-time algorithm to determine, for $NFA$s $M_1, M_2$ and a deterministic pushdown automaton $M_3$, whether $L(M_1)$ shuffled with $L(M_2)$ is a subset of $L(M_3)$. The same is true when $M_1, M_2,M_3$ are one-way nondeterministic $l$-reversal-bounded $k$-counter machines, with $M_3$ being deterministic. Other decidability and complexity results are presented for testing whether given languages $L_1, L_2$ and $R$ from various languages families satisfy $L_1$ shuffled with $L_2$ is a subset of $R$, and $R$ is a subset of $L_1$ shuffled with $L_2$. Several closure results on shuffle are also shown.
  • The family, L(INDLIN), of languages generated by linear indexed grammars has been studied in the literature. It is known that the Parikh image of every language in L(INDLIN) is semi-linear. However, there are bounded semi linear languages that are not in L(INDLIN). Here, we look at larger families of (restricted) indexed languages and study their properties, their relationships, and their decidability properties.
  • Many different deletion operations are investigated applied to languages accepted by one-way and two-way deterministic reversal-bounded multicounter machines, deterministic pushdown automata, and finite automata. Operations studied include the prefix, suffix, infix and outfix operations, as well as left and right quotient with languages from different families. It is often expected that language families defined from deterministic machines will not be closed under deletion operations. However, here, it is shown that one-way deterministic reversal-bounded multicounter languages are closed under right quotient with languages from many different language families; even those defined by nondeterministic machines such as the context-free languages. Also, it is shown that when starting with one-way deterministic machines with one counter that makes only one reversal, taking the left quotient with languages from many different language families -- again including those defined by nondeterministic machines such as the context-free languages -- yields only one-way deterministic reversal-bounded multicounter languages (by increasing the number of counters). However, if there are two more reversals on the counter, or a second 1-reversal-bounded counter, taking the left quotient (or even just the suffix operation) yields languages that can neither be accepted by deterministic reversal-bounded multicounter machines, nor by 2-way nondeterministic machines with one reversal-bounded counter.