• The dynamics of moving solids with unilateral contacts are often modeled by assuming rigidity, point contacts, and Coulomb friction due to the simplicity of these models. The canonical example of a rigid rod with one endpoint slipping in two dimensions along a fixed surface (sometimes referred to as Painlev\'e rod) has been investigated thoroughly by many authors. The generic transitions of that system include three classical transitions (slip-stick, slip reversal, lift-off) as well as a singularity called dynamic jamming, i.e. convergence to a codimension 2 manifold in state space, where rigid body theory breaks down. The goal of this paper is to identify similar singularities arising in systems with multiple point contacts, and in a broader setting to make initial steps towards a comprehensive list of generic transitions from slip motion to other types of dynamics. We show that - in addition to the classical transitions - dynamic jamming remains a generic phenomenon. We also find new forms of singularity and solution indeterminacy, as well as generic routes from sliding to self-excited microscopic or macroscopic oscillations.
  • The photometry of the minor body with extrasolar origin (1I/2017 U1) 'Oumuamua revealed an unprecedented shape: Meech et al. (2017) reported a shape elongation b/a close to 1/10, which calls for theoretical explanation. Here we show that the abrasion of a primordial asteroid by a huge number of tiny particles ultimately leads to such elongated shape. The model (called the Eikonal equation) predicting this outcome was already suggested in Domokos et al. (2009) to play an important role in the evolution of asteroid shapes.
  • The motion of a rigid, spinning disk on a flat surface ends with a dissipation-induced finite-time singularity. The problem of finding the dominant energy absorption mechanism during the last phase of the motion generated a lively debate during the past two decades. Various candidates including air drag and various types of friction have been considered, nevertheless impacts have not been examined until now. We investigate the effect of impacts caused by geometric imperfections of the disk and of the underlying flat surface, through analysing the dynamics of polygonal disks with unilateral point contacts. Similarly to earlier works, we determine the rate of energy absorption under the assumption of a regular pattern of motion analogous to precession-free motion of a rolling disk. In addition, we demonstrate that the asymptotic stability of this motion depends on parameters of the impact model. In the case of instability, the emerging irregular motion is investigated numerically. We conclude that there exists a range of model parameters (small radii of gyration or small restitution coefficients) in which absorption by impacts dominates all preiously investigated mechanisms during the last phase of motion. Nevertheless the parameter values associated with a homogenous disk on a hard surface are typically not in this range, hence the effect of impacts is in that case not dominant.
  • Ideally rigid objects establish sustained contact with one another via complete chatter (a.k.a. Zeno behavior), i.e. an infinite sequence of collisions accumulating in finite time. Alternatively, such systems may also exhibit a finite sequence of collisions followed by separation (sometimes called incomplete chatter). Earlier works concerning the chattering of slender rods in two dimensions determined the exact range of model parameters, where complete chatter is possible. We revisit and slightly extend these results. Then the bulk of the paper examines the chattering of three-dimensional objects with multiple points hitting an immobile plane almost simultaneously. In contrast to rods, the motion of these systems is complex, nonlinear, and sensitive to initial conditions and model parameters due to the possibility of various impact sequences. These difficulties explain why we model this phenomenon as a nondeterministic discrete dynamical system. We simplify the analysis by assuming linearized kinematics, frictionless interaction, by neglecting the effect of external forces, and by investigating objects with rotational symmetry. Application and extension of the theory of common invariant cones of multiple linear operators enable us to find sufficient conditions of the existence of initial conditions, which give rise to complete chatter. Additional analytical and numerical investigations predict that our sufficient conditions are indeed exact, moreover solving a simple eigenvalue problem appears to be enough to judge the possibility of complete chatter. \keywords{contact dynamics \and chattering \and Zeno behavior \and common invariant cone
  • Lyapunov stability of a mechanical system means that the dynamic response stays bounded in an arbitrarily small neighborhood of a static equilibrium configuration under small perturbations in positions and velocities. This type of stability is highly desired in robotic applications that involve multiple unilateral contacts. Nevertheless, Lyapunov stability analysis of such systems is extremely difficult, because even small perturbations may result in hybrid dynamics where the solution involves many nonsmooth transitions between different contact states. This paper concerns with Lyapunov stability analysis of a planar rigid body with two frictional unilateral contacts under inelastic impacts, for a general class of equilibrium configurations under a constant external load. The hybrid dynamics of the system under contact transitions and impacts is formulated, and a \Poincare map at two-contact states is introduced. Using invariance relations, this \Poincare map is reduced into two semi-analytic scalar functions that entirely encode the dynamic behavior of solutions under any small initial perturbation. These two functions enable determination of Lyapunov stability or instability for almost any equilibrium state. The results are demonstrated via simulation examples and by plotting stability and instability regions in two-dimensional parameter spaces that describe the contact geometry and external load.
  • This paper presents a partial reconstruction of the rotational dynamics of the Philae spacecraft upon landing on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as part of ESA's Rosetta mission. We analyze the motion and the events triggered by the failure to fix the spacecraft to the comet surface at the time of the first touchdown. Dynamic trajectories obtained by numerical simulation of a 7 degree-of-freedom mechanical model of the spacecraft are fitted to directions of incoming solar radiation inferred from in-situ measurements of the electric power provided by the solar panels. The results include a lower bound of the angular velocity of the lander immediately after its first touchdown. Our study also gives insight into the effect of the programmed turn-off of the stabilizing gyroscope after touchdown; the important dynamical consequences of a small collision during Philae's journey; and the probability that a similar landing scenario harms the operability of this type of spacecraft.
  • We investigate the dynamics of finite degree-of-freedom, planar mechanical systems with multiple sliding, unilateral frictional point contacts. A complete classification of systems with 2 sliding contacts is given. The contact-mode based approach of rigid body mechanics is combined with linear stability analysis using a compliant contact model to determine the feasibility and the stability of every possible contact mode in each class. Special forms of non-stationary contact dynamics including "impact without collision" and "reverse chattering" are also investigated. Many types of solution inconsistency and the indeterminacy are identified and new phenomena related to Painlev\'e"s non-existence and non-uniqueness paradoxes are discovered. Among others, we show that the non-existence paradox is not fully resolvable by considering impulsive contact forces. These results contribute to a growing body of evidence that rigid body mechanics cannot be developed into a complete and self-consistent theory in the presence of contacts and friction.
  • This paper is concerned with the Floating Body Problem of S. Ulam: the existence of objects other than the sphere, which can float in a liquid in any orientation. Despite recent results of F. Wegner pointing towards an affirmative answer, a full proof of their existence is still unavailable. For objects with cylindrical symmetry and density 1/2, the conditions of neutral floating are formulated as an initial value problem, for which a unique solution is predicted in certain cases by a suitable generalization of the Picard-Lindel\"of theorem. Numerical integration of the initial value problem provides a rich variety of neutrally floating shapes.
  • We have developed an experimental setup of very simple self-propelled robots to observe collective motion emerging as a result of inelastic collisions only. A circular pool and commercial RC boats were the basis of our first setup, where we demonstrated that jamming, clustering, disordered and ordered motion are all present in such a simple experiment and showed that the noise level has a fundamental role in the generation of collective dynamics. Critical noise ranges and the transition characteristics between the different collective patterns were also examined. In our second experiment we used a real-time tracking system and a few steerable model boats to introduce intelligent leaders into the flock. We demonstrated that even a very small portion of guiding members can determine group direction and enhance ordering through inelastic collisions. We also showed that noise can facilitate and speed up ordering with leaders. Our work was extended with an agent-based simulation model, too, and high similarity between real and simulation results were observed. The simulation results show clear statistical evidence of three states and negative correlation between density and ordered motion due to the onset of jamming. Our experiments confirm the different theoretical studies and simulation results in the literature about collision-based, noise-dependent and leader-driven self-propelled particle systems.