• We are considering the time-dependent transport through a discrete system, consiting of a quantum dot T-coupled to an infinite tight-binding chain. The periodic driving that is induced on the coupling between the dot and the chain, leads to the emergence of a characteristic multiple Fano resonant profile in the transmission spectrum. We focus on investigating the underlying physical mechanisms that give rise to the quantum resonances. To this end, we use Floquet theory for calculating the transmission spectrum and in addition employ the Geometric Phase Propagator (GPP) approach [Ann. Phys. 375, 351 (2016)] to calculate the transition amplitudes of the time-resolved virtual processes, in terms of which we describe the resonant behavior. This two fold approach, allows us to give a rigorous definition of a quantum resonance in the context of driven systems and explains the emergence of the characteristic Fano profile in the transmission spectrum.
  • One-dimensional topological edge modes are usually studied considering the interface between two different semi infinite periodic crystals (PCs) with inverted band structure around the Dirac point. Here we consider the case where the two PCs are finite, constituting an open scattering system, and we study the influence of the size of this finite structure on the interface mode by inspecting the complex resonances. First we show the complex resonance distribution corresponding to the band inversion around the Dirac point. Perturbations from the Dirac point display the emergence of the localized interface mode. We also report on a remarkable robustness of the interface mode as the system size varies which persists even for the smallest possible size.
  • A recursive scheme for the design of scatterers acting simultaneously as emitters and absorbers, such as lasers and coherent perfect absorbers in optics, at multiple prescribed frequencies is proposed. The approach is based on the assembly of non-Hermitian emitter and absorber units into self-dual emitter-absorber trimers at different composition levels, exploiting the simple structure of the corresponding transfer matrices. In particular, lifting the restriction to parity-time-symmetric setups enables the realization of emitter and absorber action at distinct frequencies and provides flexibility in the choice of realistic parameters. We further show how the same assembled scatterers can be rearranged to produce unidirectional and bidirectional transparency at the selected frequencies. With the design procedure being generically applicable to wave scattering in single-channel settings, we demonstrate it with concrete examples of photonic multilayer setups.
  • We introduce a class of non-local Lagrangians which allow for the variational derivation of non-local conser- vation laws in a self-consistent manner. The formalism developed here generalizes previous approaches, used in the context of $\mathcal{PT}$ symmetric quantum mechanics and optics in the paraxial approximation in a twofold way: firstly it is valid for a larger set of linear symmetry transforms and secondly it enables the derivation of additional non-local conservation laws for general higher dimensional wave mechanical systems.
  • We consider a periodic waveguide array whose unit cell consists of a $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric quadrimer with two competing loss/gain parameter pairs which lead to qualitatively different symmetry-broken phases. It is shown that the transitions between the phases are described by a symmetry-adapted nonlocal current which maps the spectral properties to the spatially resolved field, for the lattice as well as for the isolated quadrimer. Its site-average acts like a natural order parameter for the general class of one-dimensional $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric Hamiltonians, vanishing in the unbroken phase and being nonzero in the broken phase. We investigate how the beam dynamics in the array is affected by the presence of competing loss/gain rates in the unit cell, showing that the enriched band structure yields the possibility to control the propagation length before divergence when the system resides in the broken $\mathcal{PT}$ phase.
  • A theory for wave mechanical systems with local inversion and translation symmetries is developed employing the two-dimensional solution space of the stationary Schr\"odinger equation. The local symmetries of the potential are encoded into corresponding local basis vectors in terms of symmetry-induced two-point invariant currents which map the basis amplitudes between symmetry-related points. A universal wavefunction structure in locally symmetric potentials is revealed, independently of the physical boundary conditions, by using special local bases which are adapted to the existing local symmetries. The local symmetry bases enable efficient computation of spatially resolved wave amplitudes in systems with arbitrary combinations of local inversion and translation symmetries. The approach opens the perspective of a flexible analysis and control of wave localization in structurally complex systems.
  • We propose a method for calculating the isothermal critical exponent $\delta$ in Ising systems undergoing a second-order phase transition. It is based on the calculation of the mean magnetization time series within a small connected domain of a lattice after equilibrium is reached. At the pseudocritical point, the magnetization time series attains intermittent characteristics and the probability density for consecutive values of mean magnetization within a region around zero becomes a power law. Typically the size of this region is of the order of the standard deviation of the magnetization. The emerging power-law exponent is directly related to the isothermal critical exponent $\delta$ through a simple analytical expression. We employ this method to calculate with remarkable accuracy the exponent $\delta$ for the square-lattice Ising model where traditional approaches, like the constrained effective potential, typically fail to provide accurate results.
  • We study the effect of discrete symmetry breaking in inhomogeneous scattering media within the framework of generic wave propagation. Our focus is on one-dimensional scattering potentials exhibiting local symmetries. We find a class of spatially invariant nonlocal currents, emerging when the corresponding generalized potential exhibits symmetries in arbitrary spatial domains. These invariants characterize the wave propagation and provide a spatial mapping of the wave function between any symmetry related domains. This generalizes the Bloch and parity theorems for broken reflection and translational symmetries, respectively. Their nonvanishing values indicate the symmetry breaking, whereas a zero value denotes the restoration of the global symmetry where the well-known forms of the two theorems are recovered. These invariants allow for a systematic treatment of systems with any local symmetry combination, providing a tool for the investigation of the scattering properties of aperiodic but locally symmetric systems. To this aim we express the transfer matrix of a locally symmetric potential unit via the corresponding invariants and derive quantities characterizing the complete scattering device which serve as key elements for the investigation of transmission spectra and particularly of perfect transmission resonances.
  • We introduce the concept of parity symmetry in restricted spatial domains -- local parity -- and explore its impact on the stationary transport properties of generic, one-dimensional aperiodic potentials of compact support. It is shown that, in each domain of local parity symmetry of the potential, there exists an invariant quantity in the form of a non-local current, in addition to the globally invariant probability current. For symmetrically incoming states, both invariant currents vanish if weak commutation of the total local parity operator with the Hamiltonian is established, leading to local parity eigenstates. For asymmetrically incoming states which resonate within locally symmetric potential units, the complete local parity symmetry of the probability density is shown to be necessary and sufficient for the occurrence of perfect transmission. We connect the presence of local parity symmetries on different spatial scales to the occurrence of multiple perfectly transmitting resonances and propose a construction scheme for the design of resonant transparent aperiodic potentials. Our findings are illustrated through application to the analytically tractable case of piecewise constant potentials.