• Ultraviolet (UV) observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) probe the outermost layers of the explosion, and UV spectra of SNe Ia are expected to be extremely sensitive to differences in progenitor composition and the details of the explosion. Here we present the first study of a sample of high signal-to-noise ratio SN Ia spectra that extend blueward of 2900 A. We focus on spectra taken within 5 days of maximum brightness. Our sample of ten SNe Ia spans the majority of the parameter space of SN Ia optical diversity. We find that SNe Ia have significantly more diversity in the UV than in the optical, with the spectral variance continuing to increase with decreasing wavelengths until at least 1800 A (the limit of our data). The majority of the UV variance correlates with optical light-curve shape, while there are no obvious and unique correlations between spectral shape and either ejecta velocity or host-galaxy morphology. Using light-curve shape as the primary variable, we create a UV spectral model for SNe Ia at peak brightness. With the model, we can examine how individual SNe vary relative to expectations based on only their light-curve shape. Doing this, we confirm an excess of flux for SN 2011fe at short wavelengths, consistent with its progenitor having a subsolar metallicity. While most other SNe Ia do not show large deviations from the model, ASASSN-14lp has a deficit of flux at short wavelengths, suggesting that its progenitor was relatively metal rich.
  • We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C I {\lambda}1.0693 {\mu}m line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely-cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with {\Delta}m15(B) = 1.79 $\pm$ 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categorized as a "transitional" event, on the fast-declining end of normal SNe Ia as opposed to subluminous/91bg-like objects. iPTF13ebh shows NIR spectroscopic properties that are distinct from both the normal and subluminous/91bg-like classes, bridging the observed characteristics of the two classes. These NIR observations suggest composition and density of the inner core similar to that of 91bg-like events, and a deep reaching carbon burning layer not observed in slower declining SNe Ia. There is also a substantial difference between the explosion times inferred from the early-time light curve and the velocity evolution of the Si II {\lambda}0.6355 {\mu}m line, implying a long dark phase of ~ 4 days.
  • We present the discovery of a light echo from SN 2007af, a normal Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in NGC 5584. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken three years post explosion reveal two separate echoes; an outer echo and extended central region, which we propose as an unresolved inner echo. Multiple images were obtained in the F160W, F350LP, F555W, and F814W using the Wide Field Camera 3. If the outer echo is produced by an interstellar dust sheet perpendicular to the line of sight, it is located ~800 pc in front of the SN. The dust for the inner echo is 0.45 pc < d < 90 pc away from the SN. The inner echo color is consistent with typical interstellar dust wavelength-dependent scattering cross-sections, while the outer echo color does not match the predictions. Both dust sheets, if in the foreground, are optically thin for scattering, with the outer echo sheet thickness consistent with the inferred extinction from peak brightness. Whether the inner echo is from interstellar or circumstellar dust is ambiguous. Overall, the echo characteristics are quite similar to previously observed SN Ia echoes.
  • We present optical and near infrared (NIR) observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2014J. Seventeen optical and twenty-three NIR spectra were obtained from 10 days before ($-$10d) to 10 days after (+10d) the time of maximum $B$-band brightness. The relative strengths of absorption features and their patterns of development can be compared at one day intervals throughout most of this period. Carbon is not detected in the optical spectra, but we identify CI $\lambda$ 1.0693 in the NIR spectra. We find that MgII lines with high oscillator strengths have higher initial velocities than other MgII lines. We show that the velocity differences can be explained by differences in optical depths due to oscillator strengths. The spectra of SN 2014J show it is a normal SN Ia, but many parameters are near the boundaries between normal and high-velocity subclasses. The velocities for OI, MgII, SiII, SII, CaII and FeII suggest that SN 2014J has a layered structure with little or no mixing. That result is consistent with the delayed detonation explosion models. We also report photometric observations, obtained from $-$10d to +29d, in the $UBVRIJH$ and $K_s$ bands. SN 2014J is about 3 magnitudes fainter than a normal SN Ia at the distance of M82, which we attribute to extinction in the host. The template fitting package SNooPy is used to interpret the light curves and to derive photometric parameters. Using $R_V$ = 1.46, which is consistent with previous studies, SNooPy finds that $A_V = 1.80$ for $E(B-V)_{host}=1.23 \pm 0.01$ mag. The maximum $B$-band brightness of $-19.19 \pm 0.10$ mag was reached on February 1.74 UT $ \pm 0.13$ days and the supernova had a decline parameter of $\Delta m_{15}=1.11 \pm 0.02$ mag.
  • Observations in the near- and mid-ultraviolet (NUV: 2000--3500$\AA$) performed with the NASA Swift UVOT instrument have revealed that optically-normal SNe Ia feature NUV-optical color evolution that can be divided into NUV-blue and NUV-red groups, with roughly one-third of the observed events exhibiting NUV-blue color curves. Combined with an apparent correlation between NUV-blue events and the detection of unburned carbon in the optical spectra, the grouping might point to a fundamental difference within the normal SN Ia classfication. Recognizing the dramatic temporal evolution of the NUV-optical colors for all SNe Ia, as well as the existence of this sub-division, is important for studies that compare nearby SNe Ia with intermediate or high-$z$ events, for the purpose of the cosmological utilization of SNe Ia. SN 2011fe is shown to be of the NUV-blue groups, which will be useful towards interpretation of the gamma-ray line results from the INTEGRAL SPI campaign on SN 2011fe.
  • We present convincing evidence of unburned carbon at photospheric velocities in new observations of 5 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. These SNe are identified by examining 346 spectra from 124 SNe obtained before +2.5 d relative to maximum. Detections are based on the presence of relatively strong C II 6580 absorption "notches" in multiple spectra of each SN, aided by automated fitting with the SYNAPPS code. Four of the 5 SNe in question are otherwise spectroscopically unremarkable, with ions and ejection velocities typical of SNe Ia, but spectra of the fifth exhibits high-velocity (v > 20,000 km/s) Si II and Ca II features. On the other hand, the light curve properties are preferentially grouped, strongly suggesting a connection between carbon-positivity and broad band light curve/color behavior: Three of the 5 have relatively narrow light curves but also blue colors, and a fourth may be a dust-reddened member of this family. Accounting for signal-to-noise and phase, we estimate that 22 +10/-6% of SNe Ia exhibit spectroscopic C II signatures as late as -5 d with respect to maximum. We place these new objects in the context of previously recognized carbon-positive SNe Ia, and consider reasonable scenarios seeking to explain a physical connection between light curve properties and the presence of photospheric carbon. We also examine the detailed evolution of the detected carbon signatures and the surrounding wavelength regions to shed light on the distribution of carbon in the ejecta. Our ability to reconstruct the C II 6580 feature in detail under the assumption of purely spherical symmetry casts doubt on a "carbon blobs" hypothesis, but does not rule out all asymmetric models. A low volume filling factor for carbon, combined with line-of-sight effects, seems unlikely to explain the scarcity of detected carbon in SNe Ia by itself.
  • Understanding the origin and diversity of emission processes responsible for Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) remains a pressing challenge. While prompt and contemporaneous panchromatic observations have the potential to test predictions of the internal-external shock model, extensive multiband imaging has been conducted for only a few GRBs. We present rich, early-time, multiband datasets for two \swift\ events, GRB 110205A and GRB 110213A. The former shows optical emission since the early stages of the prompt phase, followed by the steep rising in flux up to ~1000s after the burst ($t^{-\alpha}$ with $\alpha=-6.13 \pm 0.75$). We discuss this feature in the context of the reverse-shock scenario and interpret the following single power-law decay as being forward-shock dominated. Polarization measurements, obtained with the RINGO2 instrument mounted on the Liverpool Telescope, also provide hints on the nature of the emitting ejecta. The latter event, instead, displays a very peculiar optical to near-infrared lightcurve, with two achromatic peaks. In this case, while the first peak is probably due to the onset of the afterglow, we interpret the second peak to be produced by newly injected material, signifying a late-time activity of the central engine.
  • We investigate the environment of the nearby (d ~ 40Mpc) broad-lined Type Ic supernova SN 2009bb. This event was observed to produce a relativistic outflow likely powered by a central accreting compact object. While such a phenomenon was previously observed only in long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), no LGRB was detected in association with SN 2009bb. Using an optical spectrum of the SN 2009bb explosion site, we determine a variety of ISM properties for the host environment, including metallicity, young stellar population age, and star formation rate. We compare the SN explosion site properties to observations of LGRB and broad-lined SN Ic host environments on optical emission line ratio diagnostic diagrams. Based on these analyses, we find that the SN 2009bb explosion site has a very high metallicity of ~2x solar, in agreement with other broad-lined SN Ic host environments and at odds with the low-redshift LGRB host environments and recently proposed maximum metallicity limits for relativistic explosions. We consider the implications of these findings and the impact that SN 2009bb's unusual explosive properties and environment have on our understanding of the key physical ingredient that enables some SNe to produce a relativistic outflow.
  • Long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) mark the explosive death of some massive stars and are a rare sub-class of Type Ibc supernovae (SNe Ibc). They are distinguished by the production of an energetic and collimated relativistic outflow powered by a central engine (an accreting black hole or neutron star). Observationally, this outflow is manifested in the pulse of gamma-rays and a long-lived radio afterglow. To date, central engine-driven SNe have been discovered exclusively through their gamma-ray emission, yet it is expected that a larger population goes undetected due to limited satellite sensitivity or beaming of the collimated emission away from our line-of-sight. In this framework, the recovery of undetected GRBs may be possible through radio searches for SNe Ibc with relativistic outflows. Here we report the discovery of luminous radio emission from the seemingly ordinary Type Ibc SN 2009bb, which requires a substantial relativistic outflow powered by a central engine. The lack of a coincident GRB makes SN 2009bb the first engine-driven SN discovered without a detected gamma-ray signal. A comparison with our extensive radio survey of SNe Ibc reveals that the fraction harboring central engines is low, ~1 percent, measured independently from, but consistent with, the inferred rate of nearby GRBs. Our study demonstrates that upcoming optical and radio surveys will soon rival gamma-ray satellites in pinpointing the nearest engine-driven SNe. A similar result for a different supernova is reported independently.
  • Massive stars end their short lives in spectacular explosions, supernovae, that synthesize new elements and drive galaxy evolution. Throughout history supernovae were discovered chiefly through their delayed optical light, preventing observations in the first moments (hours to days) following the explosion. As a result, the progenitors of some supernovae and the events leading up to their violent demise remain intensely debated. Here we report the serendipitous discovery of a supernova at the time of explosion, marked by an extremely luminous X-ray outburst. We attribute the outburst to the break-out of the supernova shock-wave from the progenitor, and show that the inferred rate of such events agrees with that of all core-collapse supernovae. We forecast that future wide-field X-ray surveys will catch hundreds of supernovae each year in the act of explosion, and thereby enable crucial neutrino and gravitational wave detections that may ultimately unravel the explosion mechanism.
  • We provide an overview of the robotic Super-LOTIS (Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System) telescope and present results from gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow observations using Super-LOTIS and other Steward Observatory telescopes. The 0.6-m Super-LOTIS telescope is a fully robotic system dedicated to the measurement of prompt and early time optical emission from GRBs. The system began routine operations from its Steward Observatory site atop Kitt Peak in April 2000 and currently operates every clear night. The telescope is instrumented with an optical CCD camera and a four position filter wheel. It is capable of observing Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) error boxes as early or earlier than the Swift UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Super-LOTIS complements the UVOT observations by providing early R- and I-band imaging. We also use the suite of Steward Observatory telescopes including the 1.6-m Kuiper, the 2.3-m Bok, the 6.5-m MMT, and the 8.4-m Large Binocular Telescope to perform follow-up optical and near infrared observations of GRB afterglows. These follow-up observations have traditionally required human intervention but we are currently working to automate the 1.6-m Kuiper telescope to minimize its response time.
  • The light curves of Type Ia Supernovae (SN Ia) are powered by gamma-rays emitted by the decay of radioactive elements such as $^{56}$Ni and its decay products. These gamma-rays are downscattered,absorbed, and eventually reprocessed into the optical emission which makes up the bulk of all supernova observations. Detection of the gamma-rays that escape the expanding star provide the only direct means to study this power source for SN Ia light curves. Unfortunately, disagreements between calculations for the gamma-ray lines have made it difficult to interpret any gamma-ray observations. Here we present a detailed comparison of the major gamma-ray line transport codes for a series of 1-dimensional Ia models. Discrepancies in past results were due to errors in the codes, and the corrected versions of the seven different codes yield very similar results. This convergence of the simulation results allows us to infer more reliable information from the current set of gamma-ray observations of SNe Ia. The observations of SNe 1986G, 1991T and 1998bu are consistent with explosion models based on their classification: sub-luminous, super-luminous and normally-luminous respectively.