• A new Bayesian method for the analysis of folded pulsar timing data is presented that allows for the simultaneous evaluation of evolution in the pulse profile in either frequency or time, along with the timing model and additional stochastic processes such as red spin noise, or dispersion measure variations. We model the pulse profiles using `shapelets' - a complete ortho-normal set of basis functions that allow us to recreate any physical profile shape. Any evolution in the profiles can then be described as either an arbitrary number of independent profiles, or using some functional form. We perform simulations to compare this approach with established methods for pulsar timing analysis, and to demonstrate model selection between different evolutionary scenarios using the Bayesian evidence. %s The simplicity of our method allows for many possible extensions, such as including models for correlated noise in the pulse profile, or broadening of the pulse profiles due to scattering. As such, while it is a marked departure from standard pulsar timing analysis methods, it has clear applications for both new and current datasets, such as those from the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) and International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA).
  • We use sensitive observations of three high redshift sources; [CII] fine structure and CO(2-1) rotational transitions for the z=6.4 Quasar host galaxy (QSO) J1148+5251, and [CII] and CO(5-4) transitions from the QSO BR1202-0725 and its sub-millimeter companion (SMG) galaxy at z=4.7. We use these observations to place constraints on the quantity Dz = z(CO) - z(CII) for each source where z(CO) and z(CII) are the observed redshifts of the CO rotational transition and [CII] fine structure transition respectively, using a combination of approaches; 1) By modelling the emission line profiles using `shapelets' to compare both the emission redshifts and the line profiles themselves, in order to make inferences about the intrinsic velocity differences between the molecular and atomic gas, and 2) By performing a marginalisation over all model parameters in order to calculate a non-parametric estimate of Dz. We derive 99% confidence intervals for the marginalised posterior of Dz of (-1.9 pm 1.3) x10^-3, (-3 pm 8) x10^-4 and (-2 pm 4) x10^-3 for J1148+5251, and the BR1202-0725 QSO and SMG respectively. We show the [CII] and CO(2-1) line profiles for J1148+5251 are consistent with each other within the limits of the data, whilst the [CII] and CO(5-4) line profiles from the BR1202-0725 QSO and SMG respectively have 65 and >99.9% probabilities of being inconsistent, with the CO(5-4) lines ~ 30% wider than the [CII] lines. Therefore whilst the observed values of Dz can correspond to variations in the quantity Delta F/F with cosmic time, where F=alpha^2/mu, with alpha the fine structure constant, and mu the proton-to-electron mass ratio, of both (-3.3 pm 2.3) x10^-4 for a look back time of 12.9 Gyr and of (-5 pm 15) x10^-5 for a look back time of 12.4 Gyr we propose that they are the result of the two species of gas being spatially separated as indicated by the inconsistencies in their line profiles.
  • The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey (NGLS) comprises an HI-selected sample of 155 galaxies spanning all morphological types with distances less than 25 Mpc. We describe the scientific goals of the survey, the sample selection, and the observing strategy. We also present an atlas and analysis of the CO J=3-2 maps for the 47 galaxies in the NGLS which are also part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. We find a wide range of molecular gas mass fractions in the galaxies in this sample and explore the correlation of the far-infrared luminosity, which traces star formation, with the CO luminosity, which traces the molecular gas mass. By comparing the NGLS data with merging galaxies at low and high redshift which have also been observed in the CO J=3-2 line, we show that the correlation of far-infrared and CO luminosity shows a significant trend with luminosity. This trend is consistent with a molecular gas depletion time which is more than an order of magnitude faster in the merger galaxies than in nearby normal galaxies. We also find a strong correlation of the L(FIR)/L(CO3-2) ratio with the atomic to molecular gas mass ratio. This correlation suggests that some of the far-infrared emission originates from dust associated with atomic gas and that its contribution is particularly important in galaxies where most of the gas is in the atomic phase.
  • We present further observations of the Lockman Hole field, made with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 610 MHz with a resolution of 6 x 5 arcsec^2. These complement our earlier observations of the central approx 5 deg^2 by covering a further approx 8 deg^2, with an r.m.s. noise down to ~80 microJy beam^-1. A catalogue of 4934 radio sources is presented.
  • We present an analytical model for jets in Fanaroff & Riley Class I (FRI) radio galaxies, in which an initially laminar, relativistic flow is surrounded by a shear layer. We apply the appropriate conservation laws to constrain the jet parameters, starting the model where the radio emission is observed to brighten abruptly. We assume that the laminar flow fills the jet there and that pressure balance with the surroundings is maintained from that point outwards. Entrainment continuously injects new material into the jet and forms a shear layer, which contains material from both the environment and the laminar core. The shear layer expands rapidly with distance until finally the core disappears, and all of the material is mixed into the shear layer. Beyond this point, the shear layer expands in a cone and decelerates smoothly. We apply our model to the well-observed FRI source 3C31 and show that there is a self-consistent solution. We derive the jet power, together with the variations of mass flux and and entrainment rate with distance from the nucleus. The predicted variation of bulk velocity with distance in the outer parts of the jets is in good agreement with model fits to VLA observations. Our prediction for the shape of the laminar core can be tested with higher-resolution imaging.
  • We present data probing the spatial and kinematical distribution of both the atomic (HI) and molecular (CO) gas in NGC 5218, the late-type barred spiral galaxy in the spiral-elliptical interacting pair, Arp 104. We consider these data in conjunction with far-infrared and radio continuum data, and N-body simulations, to study the galaxies interactions, and the star formation properties of NGC 5218. We use these data to assess the importance of the bar and tidal interaction on the evolution of NGC 5218, and the extent to which the tidal interaction may have been important in triggering the bar. The molecular gas distribution of NGC 5218 appears to have been strongly affected by the bar; the distribution is centrally condensed with a very large surface density in the central region. The N-body simulations indicate a timescale since perigalacticon of approximately 3 x 10**8 yr, which is consistent with the interaction having triggered or enhanced the bar potential in NGC 5218, leading to inflow and the large central molecular gas density observed. Whilst NGC 5218 appears to be undergoing active star formation, its star formation efficiency is comparable to a `normal' SBb galaxy. We propose that this system may be on the brink of a more active phase of star formation.
  • We present Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope 21-cm HI observations towards a sample of compact radio sources behind galaxy groups, to search for cool HI. The results -- from high dynamic range spectra for 8 lines-of-sight through 7 galaxy groups -- do not show any evidence for absorption by cool HI. At a resolution of 20 km/s, the optical depth upper limits obtained were between 0.0075 and 0.035 (3sigma); these correspond to upper limits of a few times 10**23 m**-2 for the column density of any cool HI along these lines of sight (assuming a spin temperature of 100 K).
  • We investigate the atomic and molecular interstellar medium and star formation of NGC 275, the late-type spiral galaxy in Arp 140, which is interacting with NGC 274, an early-type system. The atomic gas (HI) observations reveal a tidal tail from NGC 275 which extends many optical radii beyond the interacting pair. The HI morphology implies a prograde encounter between the galaxy pair approximately 1.5 x 10**8 years ago. The Halpha emission from NGC 275 indicates clumpy irregular star-formation, clumpiness which is mirrored by the underlying mass distribution as traced by the Ks-band emission. The molecular gas distribution is striking in its anti-correlation with the {HII regions. Despite the evolved nature of NGC 275's interaction and its barred potential, neither the molecular gas nor the star formation are centrally concentrated. We suggest that this structure results from stochastic star formation leading to preferential consumption of the gas in certain regions of the galaxy. In contrast to the often assumed picture of interacting galaxies, NGC 275, which appears to be close to merger, does not display enhanced or centrally concentrated star formation. If the eventual merger is to lead to a significant burst of star formation it must be preceded by a significant conversion of atomic to molecular gas as at the current rate of star formation all the molecular gas will be exhausted by the time the merger is complete.
  • Using the third data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) we have rigorously defined a volume limited sample of early-type galaxies in the redshift range z < 0.1. We have defined the density of the local environment for each galaxy using a method which takes account of the redshift bias introduced by survey boundaries if traditional methods are used. At luminosities greater than our absolute r-band magnitude cutoff of -20.45 the mean density of environment shows no trend with redshift. We calculate the Lick indices for the entire sample and correct for aperture effects and velocity dispersion in a model independent way. Although we find no dependence of redshift or luminosity with environment we do find that the mean velocity dispersion, sigma, of early-type galaxies in dense environments tends to be higher than in low density environments. Taking account of this effect we find that several indices show small but very significant trends with environment that are not the result of the correlation between indices and velocity dispersion. The statistical significance of the data is sufficiently high to reveal that models accounting only for alpha-enhancement struggle to produce a consistent picture of age and metallicity of the sample galaxies, whereas a model that also includes carbon enhancement fares much better. We find that early-type galaxies in the field are younger than those in environments typical of clusters but that neither metallicity, alpha-enhancement nor carbon enhancement are influenced by the environment. The youngest early-type galaxies in both field and cluster environments are those with the lowest sigma. However, there is some evidence that the objects with the largest sigma are slightly younger, especially in denser environments.
  • We have combined up-to-date stellar population synthesis models, a simple radiative transfer approach, and a fully comprehensive dust model with the aim of developing a simple but quantitative way of interpreting the mid-infrared spectra of galaxies. We apply these models to the observed correlations of mid-infrared luminosities (at 8 and 24 micron) with the star-formation rate of normal galaxies and find that the observations are naturally reproduced by our models. We further find that the observed 24 micron correlation places a weak constraint on relative distribution of dust and stars.
  • The effect of galaxy interactions on star formation has been investigated using Data Release 1 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Both the imaging and spectroscopy data products have been used to construct a catalogue of nearest companions to a volume limited (0.03 < z < 0.1) sample of galaxies drawn from the main galaxy sample of SDSS. Of the 13973 galaxies in the volume limited sample, we have identified 12492 systems with companions at projected separations less than 300 kpc. Star-formation rates for the volume-limited sample have been calculated from extinction and aperture corrected H-alpha luminosities and, where available, IRAS data. Specific star formation rates were calculated by estimating galaxy masses from z-band luminosities, and r-band concentration indices were used as an indicator of morphological class. The mean specific star-formation rate is found to be strongly enhanced for projected separations of less than 30 kpc. For late-type galaxies the correlation extends out to projected separations of 300 kpc and is most pronounced in actively star-forming systems. The specific star-formation rate is observed to decrease with increasing recessional velocity difference, but the magnitude of this effect is small compared to that associated with the projected separation. We also observe a tight relationship between the concentration index and pair separation; the mean concentration index is largest for pairs with separations of approximately 75 kpc and declines rapidly for separations smaller than this. This is interpreted as being due to the presence of tidally-triggered nuclear starbursts in close pairs. Further, we find no dependence of star formation enhancement on the morphological type or mass of the companion galaxy
  • We have performed 3D hydrodynamical simulations of FR-II radio sources in beta-profile cooling-flow clusters. The effects of cooling of the cluster gas were incorporated into a modified version of the ZEUS-MP code. The simulations followed not only the active phase of the radio source, but also the long term behaviour for up to 2 Gyr after the jets of the radio source were switched off. We find as expected that the radio source has a significant effect on the cooling flow while it is active, however we also find that the effects of the radio source on the cluster are long-lived. A buoyancy driven convective flow is established as the remnants of the radio source rise through the cluster dragging material from the cluster core. Although the central Mpc of the cluster reverts to having a cooling flow, this asymmetric convective flow is able to remove the cool gas accumulating at the cluster core and indeed there is a net outflow persisting for timescales of about an order of magnitude longer than the time for which the source is active or longer. The convective flow may also provide a mechanism to enhance the metallicity of the cluster gas at large cluster radii.
  • The effect of the expansion of powerful FR-II radio sources into a cluster environment is discussed. The analysis considers both the thermal and temporal evolution of the ICM which has passed through the bow shock of the radio source and the effect of this swept-up gas on the dynamics of the radio source itself. The final state of the swept-up ICM is critcally dependent on the thermal conductivity of the gas. If the gas behind the bow shock expands adiabatically, and the source is expanding into a steeply falling atmosphere, then a narrow dense layer will form as the radio source lifts gas out of the cluster potential. This layer has a cooling time very much less than that of the gas just ahead of the radio source. This effect does not occur if the thermal conductivity of the gas is high, or if the cluster atmosphere is shallow. The swept-up gas also affects the dyamics of the radio source especially as it slows towards sub-sonic expansion. The preferential accumulation of the swept-up gas to the sides of the cocoon leads to the aspect ratio of the source increasing. Eventually the contact surface must become Rayleigh-Taylor unstable leading both to inflow of the swept-up ICM into the cavity created by the cocoon, but also substantial mixing of the cooler denser swept-up gas with the ambient ICM thereby creating a multi-phase ICM. The radio source is likely to have a marked effect on the cluster on timescales long compared to the age of the source.
  • We have used SCUBA to observe a complete sample of 104 galaxies selected at 60 microns from the IRAS BGS and we present here the 850 micron measurements. Fitting the 60,100 and 850 micron fluxes with a single temperature dust model gives the sample mean temperature T=36 K and beta = 1.3. We do not rule out the possibility of dust which is colder than this, if a 20 K component was present then our dust masses would increase by factor 1.5-3. We present the first measurements of the luminosity and dust mass functions, which were well fitted by Schechter functions (unlike those 60 microns). We have correlated many global galaxy properties with the submillimetre and find that there is a tendancy for less optically luminous galaxies to contain warmer dust and have greater star formation efficiencies (cf. Young 1999). The average gas-to-dust ratio for the sample is 581 +/- 43 (using both atomic and molecular hydrogen), significantly higher than the Galactic value of 160. We believe this discrepancy is due to a cold dust component at T < 20 K. There is a suprisingly tight correlation between dust mass and the mass of molecular hydrogen as estimated from CO measurements, with an intrinsic scatter of ~50%.
  • In a previous paper we presented measurements of the properties of jets and cores in a large sample of FRII radio galaxies with z<0.3. Here we test, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, the consistency of those data with models in which the prominences of cores and jets are determined by relativistic beaming. We conclude that relativistic beaming is needed to explain the relationships between core and jet prominences, and that speeds between 0.5 and 0.7c on kpc scales provide the best fits to the data.
  • We present new radio continuum data at 4 frequencies on the supermassive, peculiar galaxy NGC 1961. These observations allow us to separate the thermal and the nonthermal radio emission and to determine the nonthermal spectral index distribution. This spectral index distribution in the galactic disk is unusual: at the maxima of the radio emission the synchrotron spectrum is very steep, indicating aged cosmic ray electrons. Away from the maxima the spectrum is much flatter. The steep spectrum of the synchrotron emission at the maxima indicates that a strong decline of the star formation rate has taken place at these sites. The extended radio emission is a sign of recent cosmic ray acceleration, probably by recent star formation. We suggest that a violent event in the past, most likely a merger or a collision with an intergalactic gas cloud, has caused the various unusual features of the galaxy.
  • We present observations made with the VLA at 1.5 and 8.4 GHz of the nearby FRI radio galaxy 3C296. The most recent models of FRI radio galaxies suggest that substantial deceleration must take place in their jets, with strongly relativistic velocities on parsec scales giving place to at most mildly relativistic velocities on scales of tens of kiloparsecs. The region over which this deceleration takes place is therefore of considerable interest. By considering the side-to-side asymmetries of the jets of 3C296, we constrain the region of strong deceleration in the source. Our observations show evidence that the jets have slow edges surrounding faster central spines. We discuss the implications of our observations for models of the magnetic field structure in these objects.
  • We present high-sensitivity multi-frequency radio continuum observations of the starburst galaxy NGC~2146. We have fitted these data with a three-dimensional diffusion model. The model can describe the radio emission from the inner disk of NGC~2146 well, indicating that diffusion is the dominant mode of propagation in this region. Our results are indicating that NGC~2146 has recently undergone a starburst, the star forming activity being located in a central bar. The spatial variation of the radio emission and of the spectral index yield tight constraints on the diffusion coefficient $D_0$ and the energy dependence of the diffusion. Away from the central bar of the galaxy the radio emission becomes filamentary and the diffusion model was found to be a poor fit to the data in these regions; we attribute this to different transport processes being important in the halo of the galaxy.