• Only a few hot Jupiters are known to orbit around fast rotating stars. These exoplanets are harder to detect and characterize and may be less common than around slow rotators. Here, we report the discovery of the transiting hot Jupiter XO-6b, which orbits a bright, hot, and fast rotating star: V = 10.25, Teff = 6720 +/- 100 K, v sin i = 48 +/- 3 km/s. We detected the planet from its transits using the XO instruments and conducted a follow-up campaign. Because of the fast stellar rotation, radial velocities taken along the orbit do not yield the planet's mass with a high confidence level, but we secure a 3-sigma upper limit Mp < 4.4 MJup. We also obtain high resolution spectroscopic observations of the transit with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 193-cm telescope of the Observatoire de Haute-Provence and analyze the stellar lines profile by Doppler tomography. The transit is clearly detected in the spectra. The radii measured independently from the tomographic analysis and from the photometric lightcurves are consistent, showing that the object detected by both methods is the same and indeed transits in front of XO-6. We find that XO-6b lies on a prograde and misaligned orbit with a sky-projected obliquity lambda = -20.7 +/- 2.3 deg. The rotation period of the star is shorter than the orbital period of the planet: Prot < 2.12 days, Porb = 3.77 days. Thus, this system stands in a largely unexplored regime of dynamical interactions between close-in giant planets and their host stars.
  • Photometric measurements are prone to systematic errors presenting a challenge to low-amplitude variability detection. In search for a general-purpose variability detection technique able to recover a broad range of variability types including currently unknown ones, we test 18 statistical characteristics quantifying scatter and/or correlation between brightness measurements. We compare their performance in identifying variable objects in seven time series data sets obtained with telescopes ranging in size from a telephoto lens to 1m-class and probing variability on time-scales from minutes to decades. The test data sets together include lightcurves of 127539 objects, among them 1251 variable stars of various types and represent a range of observing conditions often found in ground-based variability surveys. The real data are complemented by simulations. We propose a combination of two indices that together recover a broad range of variability types from photometric data characterized by a wide variety of sampling patterns, photometric accuracies, and percentages of outlier measurements. The first index is the interquartile range (IQR) of magnitude measurements, sensitive to variability irrespective of a time-scale and resistant to outliers. It can be complemented by the ratio of the lightcurve variance to the mean square successive difference, 1/h, which is efficient in detecting variability on time-scales longer than the typical time interval between observations. Variable objects have larger 1/h and/or IQR values than non-variable objects of similar brightness. Another approach to variability detection is to combine many variability indices using principal component analysis. We present 124 previously unknown variable stars found in the test data.
  • We present Chandra and Swift X-ray observations of four extremely low-mass (ELM) white dwarfs with massive companions. We place stringent limits on X-ray emission from all four systems, indicating that neutron star companions are extremely unlikely and that the companions are almost certainly white dwarfs. Given the observed orbital periods and radial velocity amplitudes, the total masses of these binaries are greater than 1.02 to 1.39 Msun. The extreme mass ratios between the two components make it unlikely that these binary white dwarfs will merge and explode as Type Ia or underluminous supernovae. Instead, they will likely go through stable mass transfer through an accretion disk and turn into interacting AM CVn. Along with three previously known systems, we identify two of our targets, J0811 and J2132, as systems that will definitely undergo stable mass transfer. In addition, we use the binary white dwarf sample from the ELM Survey to constrain the inspiral rate of systems with extreme mass ratios. This rate, 0.00017/year, is consistent with the AM CVn space density estimated from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Hence, stable mass transfer double white dwarf progenitors can account for the entire AM CVn population in the Galaxy.
  • We have obtained extensive photometric observations of the polluted white dwarf WD 1145+017 which has been reported to be transited by at least one, and perhaps several, large asteroids (or, planetesimals) with dust emission. We have carried out 53 observation sessions on 37 nights, totaling 192 hours, of this 17th magnitude star with small to modest size telescopes covering the interval 2015 November 1 to 2016 January 21. In all, we have detected some 237 significant dips in flux. Periodograms of the data reveal a significant periodicity of 4.5004 hours that is consistent with the dominant ("A") period detected with K2. The folded light curve at this period shows there is an hour-long depression in flux with a mean depth of nearly 10%. This depression is comprised of a series of shorter and sometimes deeper dips that do not always occur at exactly the same orbital phase, and which would be unresolvable with K2. In fact, we find numerous dips in flux at other orbital phases. Nearly all of the dips associated with this activity appear to drift systematically in phase with respect to the "A" period by about 2.5 minutes per day with a dispersion of ~0.5 min/d, corresponding to a mean drift period of 4.4928 hours. In all, we can track approximately 15 of these drifting features. There is no detection of the "B"-"F" periods found with K2, but if they remain at the K2 levels we would not expect to have seen them. We explain the drifting motion as that of smaller bodies (`fragments') that break off from the asteroid and go into a slightly smaller orbit than that of the asteroid. If our interpretation is correct, we can use the drift rate to determine the mass of the asteroid. Under that scenario, we find that the mass of the asteroid is M_a ~ = 10^23 grams, or about 1/10th the mass of Ceres, with an uncertainty of about a factor of 2.