• The Tunka observatory is located close to Lake Baikal in Siberia, Russia. Its main detector, Tunka-133, is an array of photomultipliers measuring Cherenkov light of air showers initiated by cosmic rays in the energy range of approximately $10^{16}-10^{18}\,$eV. In the last years, several extensions have been built at the Tunka site, e.g., a scintillator array named Tunka-Grande, a sophisticated air-Cherenkov-detector prototype named HiSCORE, and the radio extension Tunka-Rex. Tunka-Rex started operation in October 2012 and currently features 44 antennas distributed over an area of about $3\,$km$^2$, which measure the radio emission of the same air showers detected by Tunka-133 and Tunka-Grande. Tunka-Rex is a technological demonstrator that the radio technique can provide an economic extension of existing air-shower arrays. The main scientific goal is the cross-calibration with the air-Cherenkov measurements. By this cross-calibration, the precision for the reconstruction of the energy and mass of the primary cosmic-ray particles can be determined. Finally, Tunka-Rex can be used for cosmic-ray physics at energies close to $1\,$EeV, where the standard Tunka-133 analysis is limited by statistics. In contrast to the air-Cherenkov measurements, radio measurements are not limited to dark, clear nights and can provide an order of magnitude larger exposure.
  • Tunka-Rex is the radio extension of the Tunka cosmic-ray observatory in Siberia close to Lake Baikal. Since October 2012 Tunka-Rex measures the radio signal of air-showers in coincidence with the non-imaging air-Cherenkov array Tunka-133. Furthermore, this year additional antennas will go into operation triggered by the new scintillator array Tunka-Grande measuring the secondary electrons and muons of air showers. Tunka-Rex is a demonstrator for how economic an antenna array can be without losing significant performance: we have decided for simple and robust SALLA antennas, and we share the existing DAQ running in slave mode with the PMT detectors and the scintillators, respectively. This means that Tunka-Rex is triggered externally, and does not need its own infrastructure and DAQ for hybrid measurements. By this, the performance and the added value of the supplementary radio measurements can be studied, in particular, the precision for the reconstructed energy and the shower maximum in the energy range of approximately $10^{17}-10^{18}\,$eV. Here we show first results on the energy reconstruction indicating that radio measurements can compete with air-Cherenkov measurements in precision. Moreover, we discuss future plans for Tunka-Rex.