• We present a new definition of subhalos in dissipationless dark matter N-body simulations, based on the coherent identification of their dynamically bound constituents. Whereas previous methods of determining the energetically bound components of a subhalo ignored the contribution of all the remaining particles in the halo (those not geometrically or dynamically associated with the subhalo), our method allows for all the forces, both internal and external, exerted on the subhalo. We demonstrate, using the output of a simulation at different timesteps, that our new method is more accurate at identifying the bound mass of a subhalo. We then compare our new method to previously adopted means of identifying subhalos by applying each to a sample of 1838 virialized halos extracted from a high resolution cosmological simulation. We find that the subhalo distributions are similar in each case, and that the increase in the binding energy of a subhalo from including all the particles located within it is almost entirely balanced by the losses due to the external forces; the net increase in the mass fraction of subhalos is roughly 10%, and the extra substructures tending to reside in the inner parts of the system. Finally, we compare the subhalo populations of halos to the sub-subhalo populations of subhalos, finding the two distributions to be similar. This is a new and interesting result, suggesting a self-similarity in the hierarchy substructures within cluster mass halos.
  • We have identified over 2000 well resolved cluster halos, and also their associated bound subhalos, from the output of a 1024^3 particle cosmological N-body simulation (of box size 320 h^-1 Mpc and softening length 3.2 h^-1 kpc). This has allowed us to measure halo quantities in a statistically meaningful way, and for the first time analyse their distribution for a large and well resolved sample. We characterize each halo in terms of its morphology, concentration, spin, circular velocity and the fraction of their mass in substructure. We also identify those halos that have not yet reached a state of dynamical equilibrium using the virial theorem with an additional correction to account for the surface pressure at the boundary. These amount to 3.4% of our initial sample. For the virialized halos, we find a median of 5.6% of halo mass is contained within substructure, with the distribution ranging between no identified subhalos to 65%. The fraction of mass in substructure increases with halo mass with logarithmic slope of 0.44 +- 0.06. Halos tend to have a prolate morphology, becoming more so with increasing mass. Subhalos have a greater orbital angular momentum per unit mass than their host halo. Furthermore, their orbital angular momentum is typically well aligned with that of their host. Overall, we find that dimensionless properties of dark matter halos do depend on their mass, thereby demonstrating a lack of self-similarity.
  • We explore several physical effects on the power spectrum of the Lyman-alpha forest transmitted flux. The effects we investigate here are usually not part of hydrodynamic simulations and so need to be estimated separately. The most important effect is that of high column density absorbers with damping wings, which add power on large scales. We compute their effect using the observational constraints on their abundance as a function of column density. Ignoring their effect leads to an underestimation of the slope of the linear theory power spectrum. The second effect we investigate is that of fluctuations in the ionizing radiation field. For this purpose we use a very large high resolution N-body simulation, which allows us to simulate both the fluctuations in the ionizing radiation and the small scale LyaF within the same simulation. We find an enhancement of power on large scales for quasars and a suppression for galaxies. The strength of the effect rapidly increases with increasing redshift, allowing it to be uniquely identified in cases where it is significant. We develop templates which can be used to search for this effect as a function of quasar lifetime, quasar luminosity function, and attenuation length. Finally, we explore the effects of galactic winds using hydrodynamic simulations. We find the wind effects on the LyaF power spectrum to be be degenerate with parameters related to the temperature of the gas that are already marginalized over in cosmological fits. While more work is needed to conclusively exclude all possible systematic errors, our results suggest that, in the context of data analysis procedures where parameters of the LyaF model are properly marginalized over, the flux power spectrum is a reliable tracer of cosmological information.
  • We have simulated the formation of an X-ray cluster in a cold dark matter universe using 12 different codes. The codes span the range of numerical techniques and implementations currently in use, including SPH and grid methods with fixed, deformable or multilevel meshes. The goal of this comparison is to assess the reliability of cosmological gas dynamical simulations of clusters in the simplest astrophysically relevant case, that in which the gas is assumed to be non-radiative. We compare images of the cluster at different epochs, global properties such as mass, temperature and X-ray luminosity, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. On the whole, the agreement among the various simulations is gratifying although a number of discrepancies exist. Agreement is best for properties of the dark matter and worst for the total X-ray luminosity. Even in this case, simulations that adequately resolve the core radius of the gas distribution predict total X-ray luminosities that agree to within a factor of two. Other quantities are reproduced to much higher accuracy. For example, the temperature and gas mass fraction within the virial radius agree to about 10%, and the ratio of specific kinetic to thermal energies of the gas agree to about 5%. Various factors contribute to the spread in calculated cluster properties, including differences in the internal timing of the simulations. Based on the overall consistency of results, we discuss a number of general properties of the cluster we have modelled.