• We present deep high resolution (0.03", 200pc) ALMA Band 7 observations covering the dust continuum and [CII] $\lambda157.7\mu$m emission in four $z\sim4.4-4.8$ sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) selected from the ALESS and AS2UDS surveys. The data show that the rest-frame 160$\mu$m (observed 345 GHz) dust emission is consistent with smooth morphologies on kpc scales for three of the sources. One source, UDS47.0, displays apparent substructure but this is also consistent with a smooth morphology, as indicated by simulations showing that smooth exponential disks can appear clumpy when observed at high angular resolution (0.03") and depth of these observations ($\sigma_{345\text{GHz}} \sim27-47\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$). The four SMGs are bright [CII] emitters, and we extract [CII] spectra from the high resolution data, and recover $\sim20-100$% of the [CII] flux and $\sim40-80$% of the dust continuum emission, compared to the previous lower resolution observations. When tapered to 0.2" resolution our maps recover $\sim80-100$% of the continuum emission, indicating that $\sim60$% of the emission is resolved out on $\sim200$pc scales. We find that the [CII] emission in high-redshift galaxies is more spatially extended than the rest-frame 160$\mu$m dust continuum by a factor of $1.6\pm0.4$. By considering the $L_{\text{[CII]}}$/$L_{\text{FIR}}$ ratio as a function of the star-formation rate surface density ($\Sigma_{\text{SFR}}$) we revisit the [CII] deficit, and suggest that the decline in the $L_{\text{[CII]}}$/$L_{\text{FIR}}$ ratio as a function of $\Sigma_{\text{SFR}}$ is consistent with local processes. We also explore the physical drivers that may be responsible for these trends and can give rise to the properties found in the densest regions of SMGs.
  • This paper provides an update of our previous scaling relations (Genzel et al.2015) between galaxy integrated molecular gas masses, stellar masses and star formation rates, in the framework of the star formation main-sequence (MS), with the main goal to test for possible systematic effects. For this purpose our new study combines three independent methods of determining molecular gas masses from CO line fluxes, far-infrared dust spectral energy distributions, and ~1mm dust photometry, in a large sample of 1444 star forming galaxies (SFGs) between z=0 and 4. The sample covers the stellar mass range log(M*/M_solar)=9.0-11.8, and star formation rates relative to that on the MS, delta_MS=SFR/SFR(MS), from 10^{-1.3} to 10^{2.2}. Our most important finding is that all data sets, despite the different techniques and analysis methods used, follow the same scaling trends, once method-to-method zero point offsets are minimized and uncertainties are properly taken into account. The molecular gas depletion time t_depl, defined as the ratio of molecular gas mass to star formation rate, scales as (1+z)^{-0.6}x(delta_MS)^{-0.44}, and is only weakly dependent on stellar mass. The ratio of molecular-to-stellar mass mu_gas depends on (1+z)^{2.5}x (delta_MS)^{0.52}x(M*)^{-0.36}, which tracks the evolution of the specific star formation rate. The redshift dependence of mu_gas requires a curvature term, as may the mass-dependences of t_depl and mu_gas. We find no or only weak correlations of t_depl and mu_gas with optical size R or surface density once one removes the above scalings, but we caution that optical sizes may not be appropriate for the high gas and dust columns at high-z.
  • We present ALMA and VLA detections of the dense molecular gas tracers HCN, HCO$^+$ and HNC in two lensed, high-redshift starbursts selected from the {\it Herschel}-ATLAS survey: {\it H}-ATLAS\,J090740.0$-$004200 (SDP.9, $z \sim 1.6$) and {\it H}-ATLAS\,J091043.1$-$000321 (SDP.11, $z \sim 1.8$). ALMA observed the $J = 3-2$ transitions in both sources, while the VLA observed the $J = 1-0$ transitions in SDP.9. We have detected all observed HCN and HCO$^+$ lines in SDP.9 and SDP.11, and also HNC(3--2) in SDP.9. The amplification factors for both galaxies have been determined from sub-arcsec resolution CO and dust emission observations carried out with NOEMA and the SMA. The HNC(1--0)/HCN(1--0) line ratio in SDP.9 suggests the presence of photon-dominated regions, as it happens to most local (U)LIRGs. The CO, HCN and HCO$^+$ SLEDs of SDP.9 are compatible to those found for many local, infrared (IR) bright galaxies, indicating that the molecular gas in local and high-redshift dusty starbursts can have similar excitation conditions. We obtain that the correlation between total IR ($L_{\rm IR}$) and dense line ($L_{\rm dense}$) luminosity in SDP.9 and SDP.11 and local star-forming galaxies can be represented by a single relation. The scatter of the $L_{\rm IR} - L_{\rm dense}$ correlation, together with the lack of sensitive dense molecular gas tracer observations for a homogeneous sample of high-redshift galaxies, prevents us from distinguishing differential trends with redshift. Our results suggest that the intense star formation found in some high-redshift dusty, luminous starbursts is associated with more massive dense molecular gas reservoirs and higher dense molecular gas fractions.
  • We present high-resolution (0.16$"$) 870um Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) imaging of 16 luminous (L_IR ~ 4 x 10^12 L_sun) submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) from the ALESS survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. This dust imaging traces the dust-obscured star formation in these z~2.5 galaxies on ~1.3 kpc scales. The emission has a median effective radius of $R_e=0.24" \pm 0.02"$, corresponding to a typical physical size of $R_{e}=1.8\pm$0.2 kpc. We derive a median S\'ersic index of $n=0.9\pm0.2$, implying that the dust emission is remarkably disk-like at the current resolution and sensitivity. We use different weighting schemes with the visibilities to search for clumps on 0.12$"$ (~1.0 kpc) scales, but we find no significant evidence for clumping in the majority of cases. Indeed, we demonstrate using simulations that the observed morphologies are generally consistent with smooth exponential disks, suggesting that caution should be exercised when identifying candidate clumps in even moderate S/N interferometric data. We compare our maps to comparable-resolution HST H$_{160}$-band images, finding that the stellar morphologies appear significantly more extended and disturbed, and suggesting that major mergers may be responsible for driving the formation of the compact dust disks we observe. The stark contrast between the obscured and unobscured morphologies may also have implications for SED fitting routines that assume the dust is co-located with the optical/near-IR continuum emission. Finally, we discuss the potential of the current bursts of star formation to transform the observed galaxy sizes and light profiles, showing that the $z\sim0$ descendants of these SMGs are expected to have stellar masses, effective radii, and gas surface densities consistent with the most compact massive (M_* ~ 1-2 x 10^11 M_sun) early-type galaxies observed locally.
  • (abridged) We report rest-frame submillimeter H2O emission line observations of 11 HyLIRGs/ULIRGs at z~2-4 selected among the brightest lensed galaxies discovered in the Herschel-ATLAS. Using the IRAM NOEMA, we have detected 14 new H2O emission lines. The apparent luminosities of the H2O emission lines are $\mu L_{\rm{H_2O}} \sim 6-21 \times 10^8 L_\odot$, with velocity-integrated line fluxes ranging from 4-15 Jy km s$^{-1}$. We have also observed CO emission lines using EMIR on the IRAM 30m telescope in seven sources. The velocity widths for CO and H2O lines are found to be similar. With almost comparable integrated flux densities to those of the high-J CO line, H2O is found to be among the strongest molecular emitters in high-z Hy/ULIRGs. We also confirm our previously found correlation between luminosity of H2O ($L_{\rm{H_2O}}$) and infrared ($L_{\rm{IR}}$) that $L_{\rm{H_2O}} \sim L_{\rm{IR}}^{1.1-1.2}$, with our new detections. This correlation could be explained by a dominant role of far-infrared (FIR) pumping in the H2O excitation. Modelling reveals the FIR radiation fields have warm dust temperature $T_\rm{warm}$~45-75 K, H2O column density per unit velocity interval $N_{\rm{H_2O}}/\Delta V \gtrsim 0.3 \times 10^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$ km$^{-1}$ s and 100 $\mu$m continuum opacity $\tau_{100} > 1$ (optically thick), indicating that H2O is likely to trace highly obscured warm dense gas. However, further observations of $J\geq4$ H2O lines are needed to better constrain the continuum optical depth and other physical conditions of the molecular gas and dust. We have also detected H2O+ emission in three sources. A tight correlation between $L_{\rm{H_2O}}$ and $L_{\rm{H_2O^+}}$ has been found in galaxies from low to high redshift. The velocity-integrated flux density ratio between H2O+ and H2O suggests that cosmic rays generated by strong star formation are possibly driving the H2O+ formation.
  • We present an analysis of a deep (1$\sigma$=13 $\mu$Jy) cosmological 1.2-mm continuum map based on ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. In the 1 arcmin$^2$ covered by ASPECS we detect nine sources at $>3.5\sigma$ significance at 1.2-mm. Our ALMA--selected sample has a median redshift of $z=1.6\pm0.4$, with only one galaxy detected at z$>$2 within the survey area. This value is significantly lower than that found in millimeter samples selected at a higher flux density cut-off and similar frequencies. Most galaxies have specific star formation rates similar to that of main sequence galaxies at the same epoch, and we find median values of stellar mass and star formation rates of $4.0\times10^{10}\ M_\odot$ and $\sim40~M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, respectively. Using the dust emission as a tracer for the ISM mass, we derive depletion times that are typically longer than 300 Myr, and we find molecular gas fractions ranging from $\sim$0.1 to 1.0. As noted by previous studies, these values are lower than using CO--based ISM estimates by a factor $\sim$2. The 1\,mm number counts (corrected for fidelity and completeness) are in agreement with previous studies that were typically restricted to brighter sources. With our individual detections only, we recover $55\pm4\%$ of the extragalactic background light (EBL) at 1.2 mm measured by the Planck satellite, and we recover $80\pm7\%$ of this EBL if we include the bright end of the number counts and additional detections from stacking. The stacked contribution is dominated by galaxies at $z\sim1-2$, with stellar masses of (1-3)$\times$10$^{10}$ M$_\odot$. For the first time, we are able to characterize the population of galaxies that dominate the EBL at 1.2 mm.
  • We present a search for [CII] line and dust continuum emission from optical dropout galaxies at $z>6$ using ASPECS, our ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF). Our observations, which cover the frequency range $212-272$ GHz, encompass approximately the range $6<z<8$ for [CII] line emission and reach a limiting luminosity of L$_{\rm [CII]}\sim$(1.6-2.5)$\times$10$^{8}$ L$_{\odot}$. We identify fourteen [CII] line emitting candidates in this redshift range with significances $>$4.5 $\sigma$, two of which correspond to blind detections with no optical counterparts. At this significance level, our statistical analysis shows that about 60\% of our candidates are expected to be spurious. For one of our blindly selected [CII] line candidates, we tentatively detect the CO(6-5) line in our parallel 3-mm line scan. None of the line candidates are individually detected in the 1.2 mm continuum. A stack of all [CII] candidates results in a tentative detection with $S_{1.2mm}=14\pm5\mu$Jy. This implies a dust-obscured star formation rate (SFR) of $(3\pm1)$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. We find that the two highest--SFR objects have candidate [CII] lines with luminosities that are consistent with the low-redshift $L_{\rm [CII]}$ vs. SFR relation. The other candidates have significantly higher [CII] luminosities than expected from their UV--based SFR. At the current sensitivity it is unclear whether the majority of these sources are intrinsically bright [CII] emitters, or spurious sources. If only one of our line candidates was real (a scenario greatly favored by our statistical analysis), we find a source density for [CII] emitters at $6<z<8$ that is significantly higher than predicted by current models and some extrapolations from galaxies in the local universe.
  • We combine molecular gas masses inferred from CO emission in 500 star forming galaxies (SFGs) between z=0 and 3, from the IRAM-COLDGASS, PHIBSS1/2 and other surveys, with gas masses derived from Herschel far-IR dust measurements in 512 galaxy stacks over the same stellar mass/redshift range. We constrain the scaling relations of molecular gas depletion time scale (tdepl) and gas to stellar mass ratio (Mmolgas/M*) of SFGs near the star formation main-sequence with redshift, specific star formation rate (sSFR) and stellar mass (M*). The CO- and dust-based scaling relations agree remarkably well. This suggests that the CO-H2 mass conversion factor varies little within 0.6dex of the main sequence (sSFR(ms,z,M*)), and less than 0.3dex throughout this redshift range. This study builds on and strengthens the results of earlier work. We find that tdepl scales as (1+z)^-0.3 *(sSFR/sSFR(ms,z,M*))^-0.5, with little dependence on M*. The resulting steep redshift dependence of Mmolgas/M* ~(1+z)^3 mirrors that of the sSFR and probably reflects the gas supply rate. The decreasing gas fractions at high M* are driven by the flattening of the SFR-M* relation. Throughout the redshift range probed a larger sSFR at constant M* is due to a combination of an increasing gas fraction and a decreasing depletion time scale. As a result galaxy integrated samples of the Mmolgas-SFR rate relation exhibit a super-linear slope, which increases with the range of sSFR. With these new relations it is now possible to determine Mmolgas with an accuracy of 0.1dex in relative terms, and 0.2dex including systematic uncertainties.
  • We study the properties of the interstellar medium in the interacting system BR1202-0725 at z=4.7 via its [NII] and [CII] fine-structure line emission. This system consists of a QSO, a sub-mm galaxy (SMG), and two Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs). Such a diversity in galaxy properties makes BR1202-0725 a unique laboratory of star formation and galaxy evolution at high redshift. We present ionized nitrogen ([NII] 205 micron) observations of this system, obtained with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We find no [NII] emission at the quasar location, but tentative [NII] line detections associated with the SMG and one of the LAEs. Together with available ionized carbon ([CII] 158 micron) ALMA observations of this system, we find the following: The [CII]/[NII] luminosity ratio is >5.5 for the QSO and the SMG, but it is as low as ~2 in the LAE, suggesting that, in this source, most of the [CII] emission is associated with the ionized medium (HII regions) rather than the neutral one (PDRs). This study demonstrates the importance of combined studies of multiple fine--structure lines in order to pin down the physical properties of the interstellar medium in distant galaxies.
  • New high-resolution maps with the IRAM Interferometer of the redshifted [C II] 158 micron line and the 0.98mm dust continuum of HDF850.1 at z = 5.185 show the source to have a blueshifted northern component and a redshifted southern component, with a projected separation of 0.3 arcsec, or 2 kpc. We interpret these components as primordial galaxies that are merging to form a larger galaxy. We think it is the resulting merger-driven starburst that makes HDF850.1 an ultraluminous infrared galaxy, with an L(IR) of 1E13 Lsun. The observed line and continuum brightness temperatures and the constant line-to-continuum ratio across the source imply (1) high [C II] line optical depth, (2) a [C II] excitation temperature of the same order as the dust temperature, and (3) dust continuum emission that is nearly optically thick at 158 microns. These conclusions for HDF850.1 probably also apply to other high-redshift submillimeter galaxies and quasar hosts in which the [C II] 158 micron line has been detected, as indicated by their roughly constant [C II]-to-158 micron continuum ratios, in sharp contrast to the large dispersion in their [C II]-to-FIR luminosity ratios. In brightness temperature units, the [C II] line luminosity is about the same as the predicted CO(1-0) luminosity, implying that the [C II] line can also be used to estimate the molecular gas mass, with the same assumptions as for CO.
  • We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 44 GHz continuum and CO J=2-1 line emission in BR1202-0725 at z=4.7 (a starburst galaxy and quasar pair) and BRI1335-0417 at z=4.4 (also hosting a quasar). With the full 8 GHz bandwidth capabilities of the upgraded VLA, we study the (rest-frame) 250 GHz thermal dust continuum emission for the first time along with the cold molecular gas traced by the Low-J CO line emission. The measured CO J=2-1 line luminosities of BR1202-0725 are L'(CO) = (8.7+/-0.8)x10^10 K km/s pc^2 and L'(CO) = (6.0+/-0.5)x10^10 K km/s pc^2 for the submm galaxy (SMG) and quasar, which are equal to previous measurements of the CO J=5-4 line luminosities implying thermalized line emission and we estimate a combined cold molecular gas mass of ~9x10^10 Msun. In BRI1335-0417 we measure L'(CO) = (7.3+/-0.6)x10^10 K km/s pc^2. We detect continuum emission in the SMG BR1202-0725 North (S(44GHz) = 51+/-6 microJy), while the quasar is detected with S(44GHz) = 24+/-6 microJy and in BRI1335-0417 we measure S(44GHz) = 40+/-7 microJy. Combining our continuum observations with previous data at (rest-frame) far-infrared and cm-wavelengths, we fit three component models in order to estimate the star-formation rates. This spectral energy distribution fitting suggests that the dominant contribution to the observed 44~GHz continuum is thermal dust emission, while either thermal free-free or synchrotron emission contributes less than 30%.
  • We present a molecular line scan in the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) that covers the entire 3mm window (79-115 GHz) using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our CO redshift coverage spans z<0.45, 1<z<1.9 and all z>2. We reach a CO detection limit that is deep enough to detect essentially all z>1 CO lines reported in the literature so far. We have developed and applied different line searching algorithms, resulting in the discovery of 17 line candidates. We estimate that the rate of false positive line detections is ~2/17. We identify optical/NIR counterparts from the deep ancillary database of the HDF-N for seven of these candidates and investigate their available SEDs. Two secure CO detections in our scan are identified with star-forming galaxies at z=1.784 and at z=2.047. These galaxies have colors consistent with the `BzK' color selection and they show relatively bright CO emission compared with galaxies of similar dust continuum luminosity. We also detect two spectral lines in the submillimeter galaxy HDF850.1 at z=5.183. We consider an additional 9 line candidates as high quality. Our observations also provide a deep 3mm continuum map (1-sigma noise level = 8.6 $\mu$Jy/beam). Via a stacking approach, we find that optical/MIR bright galaxies contribute only to <50% of the SFR density at 1<z<3, unless high dust temperatures are invoked. The present study represents a first, fundamental step towards an unbiased census of molecular gas in `normal' galaxies at high-z, a crucial goal of extragalactic astronomy in the ALMA era.
  • We present direct constraints on the CO luminosity function at high redshift and the resulting cosmic evolution of the molecular gas density, $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z), based on a blind molecular line scan in the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our line scan of the entire 3mm window (79-115 GHz) covers a cosmic volume of ~7000 Mpc$^3$, and redshift ranges z<0.45, 1.01<z<1.89 and z>2. We use the rich multiwavelength and spectroscopic database of the HDF-N to derive some of the best constraints on CO luminosities in high redshift galaxies to date. We combine the blind CO detections in our molecular line scan (presented in a companion paper) with stacked CO limits from galaxies with available spectroscopic redshifts (slit or mask spectroscopy from Keck and grism spectroscopy from HST) to give first blind constraints on high-z CO luminosity functions and the cosmic evolution of the H2 mass density $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z) out to redshifts z~3. A comparison to empirical predictions of $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z) shows that the securely detected sources in our molecular line scan already provide significant contributions to the predicted $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z) in the redshift bins <z>~1.5 and <z>~2.7. Accounting for galaxies with CO luminosities that are not probed by our observations results in cosmic molecular gas densities $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z) that are higher than current predictions. We note however that the current uncertainties (in particular the luminosity limits, number of detections, as well as cosmic volume probed) are significant, a situation that is about to change with the emerging ALMA observatory.
  • We study the sub-mm properties of color-selected galaxies via a stacking analysis applied for the first time to interferometric data at sub-mm wavelengths. We base our study on 344 GHz ALMA continuum observations of ~20''-wide fields centered on 86 sub-mm sources detected in the LABOCA Extended Chandra Deep Field South Sub-mm Survey (LESS). We select various classes of galaxies (K-selected, star-forming sBzK galaxies, extremely red objects and distant red galaxies) according to their optical/NIR fluxes. We find clear, >10-sigma detections in the stacked images of all these galaxy classes. We include in our stacking analysis Herschel/SPIRE data to constrain the dust SED of these galaxies. We find that their dust emission is well described by a modified black body with Tdust~30 K and beta=1.6 and IR luminosities of (5-11)x10^{11} Lsun, or implied star formation rates of 75-140 Msun/yr. We compare our results with those of previous studies based on single-dish observations at 870 micron and find that our flux densities are a factor 2-3 higher than previous estimates. The discrepancy is observed also after removing sources individually detected in ALESS maps. We report a similar discrepancy by repeating our analysis on 1.4\,GHz observations of the whole ECDFS. Hence we find tentative evidence that galaxies that are associated in projected and redshift space with sub-mm bright sources are brighter than the average population. Finally, we put our findings in the context of the cosmic star formation rate density as a function of redshift.
  • We report the redshift of HATLAS J132427.0+284452 (hereafter HATLAS J132427), a gravitationally lensed starburst galaxy, the first determined 'blind' by the Herschel Space Observatory. This is achieved via the detection of [C II] consistent with z = 1.68 in a far-infrared spectrum taken with the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer. We demonstrate that the [C II] redshift is secure via detections of CO J = 2 - 1 and 3 - 2 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy and the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique's Plateau de Bure Interferometer. The intrinsic properties appear typical of high-redshift starbursts despite the high lensing-amplified fluxes, proving the ability of the FTS to probe this population with the aid of lensing. The blind detection of [C II] demonstrates the potential of the SAFARI imaging spectrometer, proposed for the much more sensitive SPICA mission, to determine redshifts of multiple dusty galaxies simultaneously without the benefit of lensing.
  • Panchromatic observations of the best candidate HyLIRG from the widest Herschel extragalactic imaging survey have led to the discovery of at least four intrinsically luminous z=2.41 galaxies across a ~100-kpc region - a cluster of starbursting proto-ellipticals. Via sub-arcsecond interferometric imaging we have measured accurate gas and star-formation surface densities. The two brightest galaxies span ~3 kpc FWHM in submm/radio continuum and CO J=4-3, and double that in CO J=1-0. The broad CO line is due partly to the multitude of constituent galaxies and partly to large rotational velocities in two counter-rotating gas disks -- a scenario predicted to lead to the most intense starbursts, which will therefore come in pairs. The disks have M(dyn) of several x 10^11 Msun, and gas fractions of ~40%. Velocity dispersions are modest so the disks are unstable, potentially on scales commensurate with their radii: these galaxies are undergoing extreme bursts of star formation, not confined to their nuclei, at close to the Eddington limit. Their specific star-formation rates place them ~>5x above the main sequence, which supposedly comprises large gas disks like these. Their high star-formation efficiencies are difficult to reconcile with a simple volumetric star-formation law. N-body and dark matter simulations suggest this system is the progenitor of a B(inary)-type ~10^14.6-Msun cluster.
  • Stellar archeology shows that massive elliptical galaxies today formed rapidly about ten billion years ago with star formation rates above several hundreds solar masses per year (M_sun/yr). Their progenitors are likely the sub-millimeter-bright galaxies (SMGs) at redshifts (z) greater than 2. While SMGs' mean molecular gas mass of 5x10^10 M_sun can explain the formation of typical elliptical galaxies, it is inadequate to form ellipticals that already have stellar masses above 2x10^11 M_sun at z ~ 2. Here we report multi-wavelength high-resolution observations of a rare merger of two massive SMGs at z = 2.3. The system is currently forming stars at a tremendous rate of 2,000 M_sun/yr. With a star formation efficiency an order-of-magnitude greater than that of normal galaxies, it will quench the star formation by exhausting the gas reservoir in only ~200 million years. At a projected separation of 19 kiloparsecs, the two massive starbursts are about to merge and form a passive elliptical galaxy with a stellar mass of ~4x10^11 M_sun. Our observations show that gas-rich major galaxy mergers, concurrent with intense star formation, can form the most massive elliptical galaxies by z ~ 1.5.
  • Massive galaxies in the distant Universe form stars at much higher rates than today. Although direct resolution of the star forming regions of these galaxies is still a challenge, recent molecular gas observations at the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer enable us to study the star formation efficiency on subgalactic scales around redshift z = 1.2. We present a method for obtaining the gas and star formation rate (SFR) surface densities of ensembles of clumps composing galaxies at this redshift, even though the corresponding scales are not resolved. This method is based on identifying these structures in position-velocity diagrams corresponding to slices within the galaxies. We use unique IRAM observations of the CO(3-2) rotational line and DEEP2 spectra of four massive star forming distant galaxies - EGS13003805, EGS13004291, EGS12007881, and EGS13019128 in the AEGIS terminology - to determine the gas and SFR surface densities of the identifiable ensembles of clumps that constitute them. The integrated CO line luminosity is assumed to be directly proportional to the total gas mass, and the SFR is deduced from the [OII] line. We identify the ensembles of clumps with the angular resolution available in both CO and [OII] spectroscopy; i.e., 1-1.5". SFR and gas surface densities are averaged in areas of this size, which is also the thickness of the DEEP2 slits and of the extracted IRAM slices, and we derive a spatially resolved Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation on a scale of ~8 kpc. The data generally indicates an average depletion time of 1.9 Gyr, but with significant variations from point to point within the galaxies.
  • Massive present-day early-type (elliptical and lenticular) galaxies probably gained the bulk of their stellar mass and heavy elements through intense, dust-enshrouded starbursts - that is, increased rates of star formation - in the most massive dark matter halos at early epochs. However, it remains unknown how soon after the Big Bang such massive starburst progenitors exist. The measured redshift distribution of dusty, massive starbursts has long been suspected to be biased low in redshift owing to selection effects, as confirmed by recent findings of systems out to redshift z~5. Here we report the identification of a massive starburst galaxy at redshift 6.34 through a submillimeter color-selection technique. We unambiguously determined the redshift from a suite of molecular and atomic fine structure cooling lines. These measurements reveal a hundred billion solar masses of highly excited, chemically evolved interstellar medium in this galaxy, which constitutes at least 40% of the baryonic mass. A "maximum starburst" converts the gas into stars at a rate more than 2,000 times that of the Milky Way, a rate among the highest observed at any epoch. Despite the overall downturn of cosmic star formation towards the highest redshifts, it seems that environments mature enough to form the most massive, intense starbursts existed at least as early as 880 million years after the Big Bang.
  • We present an Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 0 survey of 126 submillimeter sources from the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey (LESS). Our 870 micron survey with ALMA (ALESS) has produced maps ~3X deeper and with a beam area ~200X smaller than the original LESS observations, doubling the current number of interferometrically-observed submillimeter sources. The high resolution of these maps allows us to resolve sources that were previously blended and accurately identify the origin of the submillimeter emission. We discuss the creation of the ALESS submillimeter galaxy (SMG) catalog, including the main sample of 99 SMGs and a supplementary sample of 32 SMGs. We find that at least 35% (possibly up to 50%) of the detected LABOCA sources have been resolved into multiple SMGs, and that the average number of SMGs per LESS source increases with LESS flux density. Using the (now precisely known) SMG positions, we empirically test the theoretical expectation for the uncertainty in the single-dish source positions. We also compare our catalog to the previously predicted radio/mid-infrared counterparts, finding that 45% of the ALESS SMGs were missed by this method. Our ~1.6" resolution allows us to measure a size of ~9 kpc X 5 kpc for the rest-frame ~300 um emission region in one resolved SMG, implying a star formation rate surface density of 80 M_sol yr^-1 kpc^-2, and we constrain the emission regions in the remaining SMGs to be <10 kpc. As the first statistically reliable survey of SMGs, this will provide the basis for an unbiased multiwavelength study of SMG properties.
  • We report matched resolution, imaging spectroscopy of the CO J=3-2 line (with the IRAM Plateau de Bure millimeter interferometer) and of the H-alpha line (with LUCI at the Large Binocular Telescope)in the massive z=1.53 main-sequence galaxy EGS 13011166, as part of the "Plateau de Bure high-z, blue sequence survey (PHIBSS). We combine these data with HST V-J-J-H-band maps to derive spatially resolved distributions of stellar surface density, star formation rate, molecular gas surface density, optical extinction and gas kinematics. The spatial distribution and kinematics of the ionized and molecular gas are remarkably similar and are well modeled by a turbulent, globally Toomre unstable rotating disk. The stellar surface density distribution is smoother than the clumpy rest-frame UV/optical light distribution, and peaks in an obscured, star forming massive bulge near the dynamical center. The molecular gas surface density and the effective optical screen extinction track each other and are well modeled by a 'mixed' extinction model. The inferred slope of the spatially resolved molecular gas to star formation rate relation depends strongly on the adopted extinction model and can vary from 0.8 to 1.7. For the preferred mixed dust-gas model we find a near linear slope.
  • Using IRAM PdBI we report the detection of H2O in six new lensed ultra-luminous starburst galaxies at high redshift, discovered in the Herschel H-ATLAS survey. The sources are detected either in the 2_{02}-1_{11} or 2_{11}-2_{02} H_2O emission lines with integrated line fluxes ranging from 1.8 to 14 Jy.km/s. The corresponding apparent luminosities are mu x L_H2O ~ 3-12 x 10^8 Lo, where mu is the lensing magnification factor (3 < mu < 12). These results confirm that H2O lines are among the strongest molecular lines in such galaxies, with intensities almost comparable to those of the high-J CO lines, and same profiles and line widths (200-900 km/s) as the latter. With the current sensitivity of PdBI, H2O can therefore easily be detected in high-z lensed galaxies (with F(500um) > 100 mJy) discovered in the Herschel surveys. Correcting the luminosities for lensing amplification, L_H2O is found to have a strong dependence on the IR luminosity, varying as ~L_IR^{1.2}. This relation which needs to be confirmed with better statistics, may indicate a role of radiative (IR) excitation of the H2O lines, and implies that high-z galaxies with L_IR >~ 10^13 Lo tend to be very strong emitters in H2O, that have no equivalent in the local universe.
  • We use sensitive observations of three high redshift sources; [CII] fine structure and CO(2-1) rotational transitions for the z=6.4 Quasar host galaxy (QSO) J1148+5251, and [CII] and CO(5-4) transitions from the QSO BR1202-0725 and its sub-millimeter companion (SMG) galaxy at z=4.7. We use these observations to place constraints on the quantity Dz = z(CO) - z(CII) for each source where z(CO) and z(CII) are the observed redshifts of the CO rotational transition and [CII] fine structure transition respectively, using a combination of approaches; 1) By modelling the emission line profiles using `shapelets' to compare both the emission redshifts and the line profiles themselves, in order to make inferences about the intrinsic velocity differences between the molecular and atomic gas, and 2) By performing a marginalisation over all model parameters in order to calculate a non-parametric estimate of Dz. We derive 99% confidence intervals for the marginalised posterior of Dz of (-1.9 pm 1.3) x10^-3, (-3 pm 8) x10^-4 and (-2 pm 4) x10^-3 for J1148+5251, and the BR1202-0725 QSO and SMG respectively. We show the [CII] and CO(2-1) line profiles for J1148+5251 are consistent with each other within the limits of the data, whilst the [CII] and CO(5-4) line profiles from the BR1202-0725 QSO and SMG respectively have 65 and >99.9% probabilities of being inconsistent, with the CO(5-4) lines ~ 30% wider than the [CII] lines. Therefore whilst the observed values of Dz can correspond to variations in the quantity Delta F/F with cosmic time, where F=alpha^2/mu, with alpha the fine structure constant, and mu the proton-to-electron mass ratio, of both (-3.3 pm 2.3) x10^-4 for a look back time of 12.9 Gyr and of (-5 pm 15) x10^-5 for a look back time of 12.4 Gyr we propose that they are the result of the two species of gas being spatially separated as indicated by the inconsistencies in their line profiles.
  • We present a list of 13 candidate gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) from 95 square degrees of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, a surface density of 0.14\pm0.04deg^{-2}. The selected sources have 500um flux densities (S_500) greater than 100mJy. Gravitational lensing is confirmed by follow-up observations in 9 of the 13 systems (70%), and the lensing status of the four remaining sources is undetermined. We also present a supplementary sample of 29 (0.31\pm0.06deg^{-2}) gravitationally lensed SMG candidates with S_500=80--100mJy, which are expected to contain a higher fraction of interlopers than the primary candidates. The number counts of the candidate lensed galaxies are consistent with a simple statistical model of the lensing rate, which uses a foreground matter distribution, the intrinsic SMG number counts, and an assumed SMG redshift distribution. The model predicts that 32--74% of our S_500>100mJy candidates are strongly gravitationally lensed (mu>2), with the brightest sources being the most robust; this is consistent with the observational data. Our statistical model also predicts that, on average, lensed galaxies with S_500=100mJy are magnified by factors of ~9, with apparently brighter galaxies having progressively higher average magnification, due to the shape of the intrinsic number counts. 65% of the sources are expected to have intrinsic 500micron flux densities less than 30mJy. Thus, samples of strongly gravitationally lensed SMGs, such as those presented here, probe below the nominal Herschel detection limit at 500 micron. They are good targets for the detailed study of the physical conditions in distant dusty, star-forming galaxies, due to the lensing magnification, which can lead to spatial resolutions of ~0.01" in the source plane.
  • The radio-quiet quasar BR1202-0725 (z=4.695) is a remarkable source with a bright Northwest (NW) companion detected at submm and radio wavelengths but invisible in the optical. In the absence of amplification by gravitational lensing, BR1202-0725 would be the most luminous binary CO and FIR source in the Universe. In this paper, we report observations with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer of BR1202-0725 in the redshifted emission of the CO(5-4) and (7-6) lines, the [C I](3P2-3P1) line, a high angular resolution (0.3 x 0.8 arcsec) 1.3 mm map of the rest-frame, far-IR dust continuum, and a search for the CO(11-10) line. We compare these results with recent ALMA data in the [C II] line. Both the quasar host galaxy and its NW companion are spatially resolved in the molecular line emission and the dust continuum. The CO profile of the NW companion is very broad with a full width at half maximum of 1000 +/- 130 km/s, compared to 360 +/- 40 km/s for the quasar host galaxy to the Southeast (SE). The difference in linewidths and center velocities, and the absence of any lens candidate or arc-like structure in the field, at any wavelength, show that the obscured NW galaxy and the SE quasar host galaxy cannot be lensed images of the same object. Instead, we find morphological and kinematic evidence for sub-structures in both the NW and SE sources. We interpret these results as strong indications that the BR1202-0725 complex is a group of young, interacting, and highly active starburst galaxies.