• We present 22 new (+3 confirmed) cataclysmic variables (CVs) in the non core-collapsed globular cluster 47 Tucanae (47 Tuc). The total number of CVs in the cluster is now 43, the largest sample in any globular cluster so far. For the identifications we used near-ultraviolet (NUV) and optical images from the Hubble Space Telescope, in combination with X-ray results from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This allowed us to build the deepest NUV CV luminosity function of the cluster to date. We found that the CVs in 47 Tuc are more concentrated towards the cluster center than the main sequence turnoff stars. We compared our results to the CV populations of the core-collapsed globular clusters NGC 6397 and NGC 6752. We found that 47 Tuc has fewer bright CVs per unit mass than those two other clusters. That suggests that dynamical interactions in core-collapsed clusters play a major role creating new CVs. In 47 Tuc, the CV population is probably dominated by primordial and old dynamically formed systems. We estimated that the CVs in 47 Tuc have total masses of approx. 1.4 M_sun. We also found that the X-ray luminosity function of the CVs in the three clusters is bimodal. Additionally, we discuss a possible double degenerate system and an intriguing/unclassified object. Finally, we present four systems that could be millisecond pulsar companions given their X-ray and NUV/optical colors. For one of them we present very strong evidence for being an ablated companion. The other three could be CO- or He-WDs.
  • We report the discovery of the likely white dwarf companions to radio millisecond pulsars 47 Tuc Q and 47 Tuc S in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. These blue stars were found in near-ultraviolet images from the Hubble Space Telescope for which we derived accurate absolute astrometry, and are located at positions consistent with the radio coordinates to within 0.016 arcsec (0.2sigma). We present near-ultraviolet and optical colours for the previously identified companion to millisecond pulsar 47 Tuc U, and we unambiguously confirm the tentative prior identifications of the optical counterparts to 47 Tuc T and 47 Tuc Y. For the latter, we present its radio-timing solution for the first time. We find that all five near-ultraviolet counterparts have U300-B390 colours that are consistent with He white dwarf cooling models for masses ~0.16-0.3 Msun and cooling ages within ~0.1-6 Gyr. The Ha-R625 colours of 47 Tuc U and 47 Tuc T indicate the presence of a strong Ha absorption line, as expected for white dwarfs with an H envelope.
  • We observed the accreting white dwarf 1E1339.8+2837 (1E1339) in the globular cluster M3 in Nov. 2003, May 2004 and Jan. 2005, using the Chandra ACIS-S detector. The source was observed in 1992 to possess traits of a supersoft X-ray source (SSS), with a 0.1-2.4 keV luminosity as large as 2x10^{35} erg/s, after which time the source's luminosity fell by roughly two orders of magnitude, adopting a hard X-ray spectrum more typical of CVs. Our observations confirm 1E1339's hard CV-like spectrum, with photon index Gamma=1.3+-0.2. We found 1E1339 to be highly variable, with a 0.5-10 keV luminosity ranging from 1.4+-0.3x10^{34} erg/s to 8.5+4.9-4.6x10^{32} erg/s, with 1E1339's maximum luminosity being perhaps the highest yet recorded for hard X-ray emission onto a white dwarf. In Jan. 2005, 1E1339 displayed substantial low-energy emission below 0.3 keV. Although current Chandra responses cannot properly model this emission, its bolometric luminosity appears comparable to or greater than that of the hard spectral component. This raises the possibility that the supersoft X-ray emission seen from 1E1339 in 1992 may have shifted to the far-UV.
  • We report on archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the globular cluster M71 (NGC 6838). These observations, covering the core of the globular cluster, were performed by the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). Inside the half-mass radius (r_h = 1.65') of M71, we find 33 candidate optical counterparts to 25 out of 29 Chandra X-ray sources while outside the half-mass radius, 6 possible optical counterparts to 4 X-ray sources are found. Based on the X-ray and optical properties of the identifications, we find 1 certain and 7 candidate cataclysmic variables (CVs). We also classify 2 and 12 X-ray sources as certain and potential chromospherically active binaries (ABs), respectively. The only star in the error circle of the known millisecond pulsar (MSP) is inconsistent with being the optical counterpart. The number of X-ray faint sources with L_x>4x10^{30} ergs/s (0.5-6.0 keV) found in M71 is higher than extrapolations from other clusters on the basis of either collision frequency or mass. Since the core density of M71 is relatively low, we suggest that those CVs and ABs are primordial in origin.
  • We observed the nearby, low-density globular cluster M71 (NGC 6838) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory to study its faint X-ray populations. Five X-ray sources were found inside the cluster core radius, including the known eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1953+1846A. The X-ray light curve of the source coincident with this MSP shows marginal evidence for periodicity at the binary period of 4.2 h. Its hard X-ray spectrum and luminosity resemble those of other eclipsing binary MSPs in 47 Tuc, suggesting a similar shock origin of the X-ray emission. A further 24 X-ray sources were found within the half-mass radius, reaching to a limiting luminosity of 1.5 10^30 erg/s (0.3-8 keV). From a radial distribution analysis, we find that 18+/-6 of these 29 sources are associated with M71, somewhat more than predicted, and that 11+/-6 are background sources, both galactic and extragalactic. M71 appears to have more X-ray sources between L_X=10^30--10^31 erg/s than expected by extrapolating from other studied clusters using either mass or collision frequency. We explore the spectra and variability of these sources, and describe the results of ground-based optical counterpart searches.
  • To expand the range in the colour-magnitude diagram where asteroseismology can be applied, we organized a photometry campaign to find evidence for solar-like oscillations in giant stars in the globular cluster M4. The aim was to detect the comb-like p-mode structure characteristic for solar-like oscillations in the amplitude spectra. The two dozen main target stars are in the region of the bump stars and have luminosities in the range 50-140 Lsun. We collected 6160 CCD frames and light curves for about 14000 stars were extracted. We obtain high quality light curves for the K giants, but no clear oscillation signal is detected. High precision differential photometry is possible even in very crowded regions like the core of M4. Solar-like oscillations are probably present in K giants, but the amplitudes are lower than classical scaling laws predict.
  • We present a 19 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of the globular cluster Terzan 1. Fourteen sources are detected within 1.4 arcmin of the cluster center with 2 of these sources predicted to be not associated with the cluster (background AGN or foreground objects). The neutron star X-ray transient, X1732-304, has previously been observed in outburst within this globular cluster with the outburst seen to last for at least 12 years. Here we find 4 sources that are consistent with the ROSAT position for this transient, but none of the sources are fully consistent with the position of a radio source detected with the VLA that is likely associated with the transient. The most likely candidate for the quiescent counterpart of the transient has a relatively soft spectrum and an unabsorbed 0.5-10 keV luminosity of 2.6E32 ergs/s, quite typical of other quiescent neutron stars. Assuming standard core cooling, from the quiescent flux of this source we predict long (>400 yr) quiescent episodes to allow the neutron star to cool. Alternatively, enhanced core cooling processes are needed to cool down the core. However, if we do not detect the quiescent counterpart of the transient this gives an unabsorbed 0.5-10 keV luminosity upper limit of 8E31 ergs/s. We also discuss other X-ray sources within the globular cluster. From the estimated stellar encouter rate of this cluster we find that the number of sources we detect is significantly higher than expected by the relationship of Pooley et al. (2003).
  • We have detected 300 X-ray sources within the half-mass radius (2.79') of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae in a deep (281 ks) Chandra exposure. We perform photometry and simple spectral fitting for our detected sources, and construct luminosity functions, X-ray color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. Eighty-seven X-ray sources show variability on timescales from hours to years. Thirty-one of the new X-ray sources are identified with chromospherically active binaries from the catalogs of Albrow et al. The radial distributions of detected sources imply roughly 70 are background sources of some kind. Most source spectra are well-fit by thermal plasma models, except for quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs, containing accreting neutron stars) and millisecond pulsars (MSPs). We identify three new candidate qLMXBs with relatively low X-ray luminosities. One of the brightest cataclysmic variables (CVs, X10) shows evidence (a 4.7 hour period pulsation and strong soft X-ray emission) for a magnetically dominated accretion flow as in AM Her systems. Most of the bright CVs require intrinsic N_H columns of order 10^{21} cm^-2, suggesting a possible DQ Her nature. A group of X-ray sources associated with bright (sub)giant stars also requires intrinsic absorption. By comparing the X-ray colors, luminosities, variability, and quality of spectral fits of the detected MSPs to those of unidentified sources, we estimate that a total of \~25-30 MSPs exist in 47 Tuc (<60 at 95% confidence), regardless of their radio beaming fraction. We estimate that the total number of neutron stars in 47 Tuc is of order 300, reducing the discrepancy between theoretical neutron star retention rates and observed neutron star populations in globular clusters. (Abstract truncated.)
  • Chandra observations of globular clusters provide insight into the formation, evolution, and X-ray emission mechanisms of X-ray binary populations. Our recent (2002) deep observations of 47 Tuc allow detailed study of its populations of quiescent LMXBs, CVs, MSPs, and active binaries (ABs). First results include the confirmation of a magnetic CV in a globular cluster, the identification of 31 additional chromospherically active binaries, and the identification of three additional likely quiescent LMXBs containing neutron stars. Comparison of the X-ray properties of the known MSPs in 47 Tuc with the properties of the sources of uncertain nature indicates that relatively few X-ray sources are MSPs, probably only ~30 and not more than 60. Considering the \~30 implied MSPs and 5 (candidate) quiescent LMXBs, and their canonical lifetimes of 10 and 1 Gyr respectively, the relative birthrates of MSPs and LMXBs in 47 Tuc are comparable.
  • We report the discovery of an optical counterpart to a quiescent neutron star in the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139). The star was found as part of our wide-field imaging study of Omega Cen using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on Hubble Space Telescope. Its magnitude and color (R_625 = 25.2, B_435 - R_625 = 1.5) place it more than 1.5 magnitudes to the blue side of the main sequence. Through an H-alpha filter it is ~ 1.3 magnitudes brighter than cluster stars of comparable M_625 magnitude. The blue color and H-alpha excess suggest the presence of an accretion disk, implying that the neutron star is accreting from a binary companion and is thus a quiescent low-mass X-ray binary. If the companion is a main-sequence star, then the faint absolute magnitude (M_625 ~ 11.6) constrains it to be of very low mass (M <~ 0.14 Msolar). The faintness of the disk (M_435 ~ 13) suggests a very low rate of accretion onto the neutron star. We also detect 13 probable white dwarfs and three possible BY Draconis stars in the 20" x 20" region analyzed here, suggesting that a large number of white dwarfs and active binaries will be observable in the full ACS study.
  • We report our analysis of a Chandra X-ray observation of the rich globular cluster M80, in which we detect some 19 sources to a limiting 0.5-2.5 keV X-ray luminosity of 7*10^30 ergs/s within the half-mass radius. X-ray spectra indicate that two of these sources are quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) containing neutron stars. We identify five sources as probable cataclysmic variables (CVs), one of which seems to be heavily absorbed, implying high inclination. The brightest CV may be the X-ray counterpart of Nova 1860 T Sco. The concentration of the X-ray sources within the cluster core implies an average mass of 1.2+/-0.2 Msun, consistent with the binary nature of these systems and very similar to the radial distribution of the blue stragglers in this cluster. The X-ray and blue straggler source populations in M80 are compared to those in the similar globular cluster 47 Tuc.
  • We report a Chandra ACIS-I observation of the dense globular cluster Terzan 5. The previously known transient low-mass x-ray binary (LMXB) EXO 1745-248 in the cluster entered a rare high state during our August 2000 observation, complicating the analysis. Nevertheless nine additional sources clearly associated with the cluster are also detected, ranging from L_X(0.5-2.5 keV)=5.6*10^{32} down to 8.6*10^{31} ergs/s. Their X-ray colors and luminosities, and spectral fitting, indicate that five of them are probably cataclysmic variables, and four are likely quiescent LMXBs containing neutron stars. We estimate the total number of sources between L_X(0.5-2.5 keV)=10^{32} and 10^{33} ergs/s as 11.4^{+4.7}_{-1.8} by the use of artificial point source tests, and note that the numbers of X-ray sources are similar to those detected in NGC 6440. The improved X-ray position allowed us to identify a plausible infrared counterpart to EXO 1745-248 on our 1998 Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS images. This blue star (F110W=18.48, F187W=17.30) lies within 0.2'' of the boresighted LMXB position. Simultaneous Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) spectra, combined with the Chandra spectrum, indicate that EXO 1745-248 is an ultracompact binary system, and show a strong broad 6.55 keV iron line and an 8 keV smeared reflection edge.
  • Our Chandra X-ray observation of the globular cluster 47 Tuc clearly detected most of the 16 MSPs with precise radio positions, and indicates probable X-ray emission from the remainder. The MSPs are soft (BB kT 0.2-0.3 keV) and faint (Lx few 10^{30} ergs/s), and generally consistent with thermal emission from small polar caps. An additional 40 soft X-ray sources are consistent with the known MSPs in X-ray colors, luminosity, and radial distribution within the cluster (and thus mass). We note that these MSPs display a flatter Lx to Edot relation than pulsars and MSPs in the field, consistent with polar cap heating models for younger MSPs and may suggest the surface magnetic field has been modified by repeated accretion episodes to include multipole components. Correlating HST images, radio timing positions, and the Chandra dataset has allowed optical searches for MSP binary companions. The MSP 47 Tuc-U is coincident with a blue star exhibiting sinusoidal variations that agree in period and phase with the heated face of the WD companion. Another blue variable star (and X-ray source) agrees in period and phase with the companion to 47 Tuc-W (which lacks an accurate timing position); this companion is probably a main sequence star.
  • We report spectral and variability analysis of two quiescent low mass x-ray binaries (previously identified with ROSAT HRI as X5 and X7) in the globular cluster 47 Tuc, from a Chandra ACIS-I observation. X5 demonstrates sharp eclipses with an 8.666+-0.008 hr period, as well as dips showing an increased N_H column. Their thermal spectra are well-modelled by unmagnetized hydrogen atmospheres of hot neutron stars, most likely heated by transient accretion, with little to no hard power law component.
  • We have detected three new x-ray point sources, in addition to the known low-mass x-ray binary (LMXB) X1832-330, in the globular cluster NGC 6652 with a Chandra 1.6 ksec HRC-I exposure. Star 49 (M_{V}~4.7), suggested by Deutsch et al.(1998) as the optical candidate for the LMXB, is identified (<0.3") not with the LMXB, but with another, newly detected source (B). Using archival HST images, we identify (<0.3") the LMXB (A) and one of the remaining new sources (C) with blue variable optical counterparts at M_{V}~3.7 and 5.3 respectively. The other new source (D) remains unidentified in the crowded cluster core. In the 0.5-2.5 keV range, assuming a 5 keV thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum and N_{H}=5.5*10^{20}, source A has intrinsic luminosity L_{X}~5.3*10^{35} ergs/s. Assuming a 1 keV thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum, B has L_{X}~4.1*10^{33} ergs/s, while C and D have L_{X}~8*10^{32}$ ergs/s. Source B is probably a quiescent LMXB, while source C may be either a luminous CV or quiescent LMXB.
  • We present new results on five of six known SX Phoenicis stars in the core of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. We give interpretations of the light curves in the V and I bands from 8.3 days of observations with the Hubble Space Telescope near the core of 47 Tuc. The most evolved SX Phe star in the cluster is a double-mode pulsator (V2) and we determine its mass to be 1.54+/-0.05 solar masses from its position in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and by comparing observed periods with current theoretical pulsation models. For V14 we do not detect any pulsation signal. For the double-mode pulsators V3, V15, and V16 we cannot give a safe identification of the modes. We also describe the photometric techniques we have used to extract the light curves of stars in the crowded core. Some of the SX Phoenicis are saturated and we demonstrate that even for stars that show signs of a bleeding signal we can obtain a point-to-point accuracy of 1-3%.
  • We present the results of a search for variability in and near the core of the metal-rich, obscured globular cluster Terzan 5, using NICMOS on HST. This extreme cluster has approximately solar metallicity and a central density that places it in the upper few percent of all clusters. It is estimated to have the highest interaction rate of any galactic globular cluster. The large extinction towards Terzan 5 and the severe stellar crowding near the cluster center present a substantial observational challenge. Using time series analysis we discovered two variable stars in this cluster. The first is a RRab Lyrae variable with a period of ~0.61 days, a longer period than that of field stars with similar high metallicities. This period is, however, shorter than the average periods of RR Lyraes found in the metal-rich globular clusters NGC 6441, NGC 6388 and 47 Tuc. The second variable is a blue star with a 7-hour period sinusoidal variation and a likely orbital period of 14 hours. This star is probably an eclipsing blue straggler, or (less likely) the infrared counterpart to the low mass X-ray binary known in Terzan 5. Due to the extreme crowding and overlapping Airy profile of the IR PSF, we fall short of our original goal of detecting CVs via Palpha emission and detecting variable infrared emission from the location of the binary MSP in Terzan 5.
  • We report results from a large Hubble Space Telescope project to observe a significant (~34,000) ensemble of main sequence stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae with a goal of defining the frequency of inner-orbit, gas-giant planets. Simulations based on the characteristics of the 8.3 days of time-series data in the F555W and F814W WFPC2 filters show that ~17 planets should be detected by photometric transit signals if the frequency of hot Jupiters found in the solar neighborhood is assumed to hold for 47 Tuc. The experiment provided high-quality data sufficient to detect planets. A full analysis of these WFPC2 data reveals ~75 variables, but NO light curves resulted for which a convincing interpretation as a planet could be made. The planet frequency in 47 Tuc is at least an order of magnitude below that for the solar neighborhood. The cause of the absence of close-in planets in 47 Tuc is not yet known; presumably the low metallicity and/or crowding of 47 Tuc interfered with planet formation, with orbital evolution to close-in positions, or with planet survival.