• The population of large asteroids is thought to be primordial and they are the most direct witnesses of the early history of our Solar System. Those satellites allow study of the mass, and hence density and internal structure. We study here the properties of the triple asteroid (107) Camilla from lightcurves, stellar occultations, optical spectroscopy, and high-contrast and high-angular-resolution images and spectro-images. Using 80 positions over 15 years, we determine the orbit of its larger satellite to be circular, equatorial, and prograde, with RMS residuals of 7.8 mas. From 11 positions in three epochs only, in 2015 and 2016, we determine a preliminary orbit for the second satellite. We find the orbit to be somewhat eccentric and slightly inclined to the primary's equatorial plane, reminiscent of the inner satellites of other asteroid triple systems. Comparison of the near-infrared spectrum of the larger satellite reveals no significant difference with Camilla. Hence, these properties argue for a formation of the satellites by excavation from impact and re-accumulation of ejecta. We determine the spin and 3-D shape of Camilla. The model fits well each data set. We determine Camilla to be larger than reported from modeling of mid-infrared photometry, with a spherical-volume-equivalent diameter of 254 $\pm$ 36 km (3 $\sigma$ uncertainty), in agreement with recent results from shape modeling (Hanus2017+). Combining the mass of (1.12 $\pm$ 0.01) $\times$ 10$^{19}$ kg determined from the dynamics of the satellites and the volume from the 3-D shape model, we determine a density of 1,280 $\pm$ 130 SI. From this density, and considering Camilla's spectral similarities with (24) Themis and (65) Cybele (for which water ice coating on surface grains was reported), we infer a silicate-to-ice mass ratio of 1-6, with a 10-30% macroporosity.
  • We present the first dynamical solution of the triple asteroid system (45) Eugenia and its two moons Petit-Prince (Diameter~7 km) and S/2004 (45) 1 (Diameter~5 km). The two moons orbit at 1165 and 610 km from the primary, describing an almost-circular orbit (e~6x10-3 and e~7x10-2 respectively). The system is quite different from the other known triple systems in the main belt since the inclinations of the moon orbits are sizeable (9 deg and 18 deg with respect to the equator of the primary respectively). No resonances, neither secular nor due to Lidov-Kozai mechanism, were detected in our dynamical solution, suggesting that these inclinations are not due to excitation modes between the primary and the moons. A 10-year evolution study shows that the orbits are slightly affected by perturbations from the Sun, and to a lesser extent by mutual interactions between the moons. The estimated J2 of the primary is three times lower than the theoretical one, calculated assuming the shape of the primary and an homogeneous interior, possibly suggesting the importance of other gravitational harmonics.
  • Mutual event observations between the two components of 90 Antiope were carried out in 2007-2008. The pole position was refined to lambda0 = 199.5+/-0.5 eg and beta0 = 39.8+/-5 deg in J2000 ecliptic coordinates, leaving intact the physical solution for the components, assimilated to two perfect Roche ellipsoids, and derived after the 2005 mutual event season (Descamps et al., 2007). Furthermore, a large-scale geological depression, located on one of the components, was introduced to better match the observed lightcurves. This vast geological feature of about 68 km in diameter, which could be postulated as a bowl-shaped impact crater, is indeed responsible of the photometric asymmetries seen on the "shoulders" of the lightcurves. The bulk density was then recomputed to 1.28+/-0.04 gcm-3 to take into account this large-scale non-convexity. This giant crater could be the aftermath of a tremendous collision of a 100-km sized proto-Antiope with another Themis family member. This statement is supported by the fact that Antiope is sufficiently porous (~50%) to survive such an impact without being wholly destroyed. This violent shock would have then imparted enough angular momentum for fissioning of proto-Antiope into two equisized bodies. We calculated that the impactor must have a diameter greater than ~17 km, for an impact velocity ranging between 1 and 4 km/s. With such a projectile, this event has a substantial 50% probability to have occurred over the age of the Themis family.
  • We report on the results of a six-month photometric study of the main-belt binary C-type asteroid 121 Hermione, performed during its 2007 opposition. We took advantage of the rare observational opportunity afforded by one of the annual equinoxes of Hermione occurring close to its opposition in June 2007. The equinox provides an edge-on aspect for an Earth-based observer, which is well suited to a thorough study of Hermione's physical characteristics. The catalog of observations carried out with small telescopes is presented in this work, together with new adaptive optics (AO) imaging obtained between 2005 and 2008 with the Yepun 8-m VLT telescope and the 10-m Keck telescope. The most striking result is confirmation that Hermione is a bifurcated and elongated body, as suggested by Marchis et al., (2005). A new effective diameter of 187 +/- 6 km was calculated from the combination of AO, photometric and thermal observations. The new diameter is some 10% smaller than the hitherto accepted radiometric diameter based on IRAS data. The reason for the discrepancy is that IRAS viewed the system almost pole-on. New thermal observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope agree with the diameter derived from AO and lightcurve observations. On the basis of the new AO astrometric observations of the small 32-km diameter satellite we have refined the orbit solution and derived a new value of the bulk density of Hermione of 1.4 +0.5/-0.2 g cm-3. We infer a macroscopic porosity of ~33 +5/-20%.
  • he triple asteroidal system (87) Sylvia is composed of a 280-km primary and two small moonlets named Romulus and Remus (Marchis et al 2005). Sylvia is located in the main asteroid belt. The satellites are in nearly equatorial circular orbits around the primary. In the present work we study the stability of the satellites Romulus and Remus, in order to identify the effects and the contribution of each perturber. The results from the 3-body problem, Sylvia-Romulus-Remus, show no significant variation of their orbital elements. However, the inclinations of the satellites present a long period evolution, when the Sun is included in the system. Such amplitude is amplified when Jupiter is included. An analysis of these results show that Romulus and Remus are librating in a secular resonance and their longitude of the nodes are locked to each other. The satellites get caught in an evection resonance with Jupiter. However, the orbital evolutions of the satellites became completely stable when the oblateness of Sylvia is included in the simulations.
  • In 2003, we initiated a long-term adaptive optics campaign to study the orbit of various main-belt asteroidal systems. Here we present a consistent solution for the mutual orbits of four binary systems: 22 Kalliope, 45 Eugenia, 107 Camilla and 762 Pulcova. With the exception of 45 Eugenia, we did not detect any additional satellites around these systems although we have the capability of detecting a loosely-bound fragment (located at 1/4 x RHill) that is ~40 times smaller in diameter than the primary. The common characteristic of these mutual orbits is that they are roughly circular. Three of these binary systems belong to a C-"group" taxonomic class. Our estimates of their bulk densities are consistently lower (~1 g/cm3) than their associated meteorite analogs, suggesting an interior porosity of 30-50% (taking CI-CO meteorites as analogs). 22 Kalliope, a W-type asteroid, has a significantly higher bulk density of ~3 g/cm3, derived based on IRAS radiometric size measurement. We compare the characteristics of these orbits in the light of tidal-effect evolution.
  • Using 8m-10m class telescopes and their Adaptive Optics (AO) systems, we conducted a long-term adaptive optics campaign initiated in 2003 focusing on four binary asteroid systems: (130) Elektra, (283) Emma, (379) Huenna, and (3749) Balam. The analysis of these data confirms the presence of their asteroidal satellite. We did not detect any additional satellite around these systems even though we have the capability of detecting a loosely-bound fragment (located at 1/4 x RHill) ~40 times smaller in diameter than the primary. The orbits derived for their satellites display significant eccentricity, ranging from 0.1 to 0.9, suggesting a different origin. Based on AO size estimate, we show that (130) Elektra and (283) Emma, G-type and P-type asteroids respectively, have a significant porosity (30-60% considering CI-CO meteorites as analogs) and their satellite's eccentricities (e~0.1) are possibly due to excitation by tidal effects. (379) Huenna and (3749) Balam, two loosely bound binary systems, are most likely formed by mutual capture. (3749) Balam's possible high bulk density is similar to (433) Eros, another S-type asteroid, and should be poorly fractured as well. (379) Huenna seems to display both characteristics: the moonlet orbits far away from the primary in term of stability (20% x RHill), but the primary's porosity is significant (30-60%).
  • In 2007, the M-type binary asteroid 22 Kalliope reached one of its annual equinoxes. As a consequence, the orbit plane of its small moon, Linus, was aligned closely to the Sun's line of sight, giving rise to a mutual eclipse season. A dedicated international campaign of photometric observations, based on amateur-professional collaboration, was organized and coordinated by the IMCCE in order to catch several of these events. The set of the compiled observations is released in this work. We developed a relevant model of these events, including a topographic shape model of Kalliope refined in the present work, the orbit solution of Linus as well as the photometric effect of the shadow of one component falling on the other. By fitting this model to the only two full recorded events, we derived a new estimation of the equivalent diameter of Kalliope of 166.2+/-2.8km, 8% smaller than its IRAS diameter. As to the diameter of Linus, considered as purely spherical, it is estimated to 28+/-2 km. This substantial "shortening" of Kalliope gives a bulk density of 3.35+/-0.33g/cm3, significantly higher than past determinations but more consistent with its taxonomic type. Some constraints can be inferred on the composition.