• Understanding the processes that determine the stellar Initial Mass Function (IMF) is a critical unsolved problem, with profound implications for many areas of astrophysics. In molecular clouds, stars are formed in cores, gas condensations which are sufficiently dense that gravitational collapse converts a large fraction of their mass into a star or small clutch of stars. In nearby star-formation regions, the core mass function (CMF) is strikingly similar to the IMF, suggesting that the shape of the IMF may simply be inherited from the CMF. Here we present 1.3 mm observations, obtained with ALMA, the world's largest interferometer, of the active star-formation region W43-MM1, which may be more representative of the Galactic-disk regions where most stars form. The unprecedented resolution of these observations reveals, for the first time, a statistically robust CMF at high masses, with a slope that is markedly shallower than the IMF. This seriously challenges our understanding of the origin of the IMF.
  • The characterization of dust properties in the interstellar medium (ISM) is key for star formation. Mass estimates are crucial to determine gravitational collapse conditions for the birth of new stellar objects in molecular clouds. However, most of these estimates rely on dust models that need further observational constraints from clouds to prestellar and protostellar cores. We present results of a study of dust emissivity changes based on mm-continuum data obtained with the NIKA camera at the IRAM-30m telescope. Observing dust emission at 1.15 mm and 2 mm allows us to constrain the dust emissivity index ($\beta$) in the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) far from its peak emission, where the contribution of other parameters (i.e. dust temperature) is important. Focusing on the Taurus molecular cloud, a low-mass star-forming regions in the Gould Belt, we analyze the emission properties of several distinct objects in the B213 filament: three prestellar cores, two Class-0/I protostellar cores and one Class-II object. By means of the ratio of the two NIKA channel-maps, we show that in the Rayleigh-Jeans approximation the dust emissivity index varies among the objects. For one prestellar and two protostellar cores, we produce a robust study using Herschel data to constrain the dust temperature of the sources. By using the Abel transform inversion technique we get accurate radial $\beta$ profiles. We find systematic spatial variations of $\beta$ in the protostellar cores that is not observed in the prestellar core. While in the former case $\beta$ decreases toward the center, in the latter it remains constant. Moreover, $\beta$ appears anticorrelated with the dust temperature. We discuss the implication of these results in terms of dust grain evolution between pre- and protostellar cores.
  • To constrain models of high-mass star formation, the Herschel/HOBYS KP aims at discovering massive dense cores (MDCs) able to host the high-mass analogs of low-mass prestellar cores, which have been searched for over the past decade. We here focus on NGC6334, one of the best-studied HOBYS molecular cloud complexes. We used Herschel PACS and SPIRE 70-500mu images of the NGC6334 complex complemented with (sub)millimeter and mid-infrared data. We built a complete procedure to extract ~0.1 pc dense cores with the getsources software, which simultaneously measures their far-infrared to millimeter fluxes. We carefully estimated the temperatures and masses of these dense cores from their SEDs. A cross-correlation with high-mass star formation signposts suggests a mass threshold of 75Msun for MDCs in NGC6334. MDCs have temperatures of 9.5-40K, masses of 75-1000Msun, and densities of 10^5-10^8cm-3. Their mid-IR emission is used to separate 6 IR-bright and 10 IR-quiet protostellar MDCs while their 70mu emission strength, with respect to fitted SEDs, helps identify 16 starless MDC candidates. The ability of the latter to host high-mass prestellar cores is investigated here and remains questionable. An increase in mass and density from the starless to the IR-quiet and IR-bright phases suggests that the protostars and MDCs simultaneously grow in mass. The statistical lifetimes of the high-mass prestellar and protostellar core phases, estimated to be 1-7x10^4yr and at most 3x10^5yr respectively, suggest a dynamical scenario of high-mass star formation. The present study provides good mass estimates for a statistically significant sample, covering the earliest phases of high-mass star formation. High-mass prestellar cores may not exist in NGC6334, favoring a scenario presented here, which simultaneously forms clouds and high-mass protostars.
  • Diffuse Galactic light has been observed in the optical since the 1930s. We propose that, when observed in the optical with deep imaging surveys, it can be used as a tracer of the turbulent cascade in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), down to scales of about 1 arcsec. Here we present a power spectrum analysis of the dust column density of a diffuse cirrus at high Galactic latitude (l ~ 198 deg, b ~ 32 deg) as derived from the combination of a MegaCam g-band image, obtained as part of the MATLAS large programme at the CFHT, with Planck radiance and Wise 12 micron data. The combination of these three datasets have allowed us to compute the density power spectrum of the HI over scales of more than three orders of magnitude. We found that the density field is well described by a single power law over scales ranging from 0.01 to 50 pc. The exponent of the power spectrum, gamma=-2.9 +- 0.1, is compatible with what is expected for thermally bi-stable and turbulent HI. We did not find any steepening of the power spectrum at small scales indicating that the typical scale at which turbulent energy is dissipated in this medium is smaller than 0.01pc. The ambipolar diffusion scenario that is usually proposed as the main dissipative agent, is consistent with our data only if the density of the cloud observed is higher than the typical values assumed for the cold neutral medium gas. We discuss the new avenue offered by deep optical imaging surveys for the study of the low density ISM structure and turbulence.
  • The surroundings of HII regions can have a profound influence on their development, morphology, and evolution. This paper explores the effect of the environment on H II regions in the MonR2 molecular cloud. We aim to investigate the density structure of envelopes surrounding HII regions and to determine their collapse and ionisation expansion ages. The Mon R2 molecular cloud is an ideal target since it hosts an H II region association. Column density and temperature images derived from Herschel data were used together to model the structure of HII bubbles and their surrounding envelopes. The resulting observational constraints were used to follow the development of the Mon R2 ionised regions with analytical calculations and numerical simulations. The four hot bubbles associated with H II regions are surrounded by dense, cold, and neutral gas envelopes. The radial density profiles are reminiscent of those of low-mass protostellar envelopes. The inner parts of envelopes of all four HII regions could be free-falling because they display shallow density profiles. As for their outer parts, the two compact HII regions show a density profile, which is typical of the equilibrium structure of an isothermal sphere. In contrast, the central UCHii region shows a steeper outer profile, that could be interpreted as material being forced to collapse. The size of the heated bubbles, the spectral type of the irradiating stars, and the mean initial neutral gas density are used to estimate the ionisation expansion time, texp, 0.1Myr,for the dense UCHII and compact HII regions and 0.35 Myr for the extended HII region. The envelope transition radii between the shallow and steeper density profiles are used to estimate the time elapsed since the formation of the first proto stellar embryo, Tinf : 1Myr, for the ultra-compact, 1.5 / 3Myr for the compact, and greater than 6Myr for the extended HII regions.
  • We present and discuss the results of the Herschel Gould Belt survey observations in a ~11 deg^2 area of the Aquila molecular cloud complex at d~260 pc, imaged with the SPIRE/PACS cameras from 70 to 500 micron. We identify a complete sample of starless dense cores and embedded protostars in this region, and analyze their global properties and spatial distributions. We find a total of 651 starless cores, ~60% of which are gravitationally bound prestellar cores, and they will likely form stars in the future. We also detect 58 protostellar cores. The core mass function (CMF) derived for the prestellar cores is very similar in shape to the stellar initial mass function (IMF), supporting the earlier view that there is a close physical link between the IMF and the CMF. The global shift in mass scale observed between the CMF and the IMF is consistent with a typical star formation efficiency of ~40%. By comparing the numbers of starless cores to the number of young stellar objects, we estimate that the lifetime of prestellar cores is ~1 Myr. We find a strong correlation between the spatial distribution of prestellar cores and the densest filaments. About 90% of the Herschel-identified prestellar cores are located above a background column density corresponding to A_V~7, and ~75% of them lie within filamentary structures with supercritical masses per unit length >~16 M_sun/pc. These findings support a picture wherein the cores making up the peak of the CMF (and probably responsible for the base of the IMF) result primarily from the gravitational fragmentation of marginally supercritical filaments. Given that filaments appear to dominate the mass budget of dense gas at A_V>7, our findings also suggest that the physics of prestellar core formation within filaments is responsible for a characteristic "efficiency" SFR/M_dense ~5+-2 x 10^-8 yr^-1 for the star formation process in dense gas.
  • This work aims at improving the current understanding of the interaction between H ii regions and turbulent molecular clouds. We propose a new method to determine the age of a large sample of OB associations by investigating the development of their associated H ii regions in the surrounding turbulent medium. Using analytical solutions, one-dimensional (1D), and three-dimensional (3D) simulations, we constrained the expansion of the ionized bubble depending on the turbulent level of the parent molecular cloud. A grid of 1D simulations was then computed in order to build isochrone curves for H ii regions in a pressure-size diagram. This grid of models allowed to date large sample of OB associations and was used on the H ii Region Discovery Survey (HRDS). Analytical solutions and numerical simulations showed that the expansion of H ii regions is slowed down by the turbulence up to the point where the pressure of the ionized gas is in a quasi-equilibrium with the turbulent ram pressure. Based on this result, we built a grid of 1D models of the expansion of H ii regions in a profile based on Larson laws. The 3D turbulence is taken into account by an effective 1D temperature profile. The ages estimated by the isochrones of this grid agree well with literature values of well-known regions such as Rosette, RCW 36, RCW 79, and M16. We thus propose that this method can be used to give ages of young OB associations through the Galaxy such as the HRDS survey and also in nearby extra-galactic sources.
  • The Chamaeleon molecular cloud complex is one of the nearest star-forming sites encompassing three molecular clouds with a different star-formation history, from quiescent (Cha III) to actively forming stars (Cha II), and reaching the end of star-formation (Cha I). To charactize its large-scale structure, we derived column density and temperature maps using PACS and SPIRE observations from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey, and applied several tools, such as filament tracing, power-spectra, \Delta-variance, and probability distribution functions of column density (PDFs), to derive physical properties. The column density maps reveal a different morphological appearance for the three clouds, with a ridge-like structure for Cha I, a clump-dominated regime for Cha II, and an intricate filamentary network for Cha III. The filament width is measured to be around 0.12\pm0.04 pc in the three clouds, and the filaments found to be gravitationally unstable in Cha I and II, but mostly subcritical in Cha III. Faint filaments (striations) are prominent in Cha I showing a preferred alignment with the large-scale magnetic field. The PDFs of all regions show a lognormal distribution at low column densities. For higher densities, the PDF of Cha I shows a turnover indicative of an extended higher density component, culminating with a power-law tail. Cha II shows a power-law tail with a slope characteristic of gravity. The PDF of Cha III can be best fit by a single lognormal. The turbulence properties of the three regions are found to be similar, pointing towards a scenario where the clouds are impacted by large-scale processes. The magnetic field could possibly play an important role for the star-formation efficiency in the Chamaeleon clouds if proven that it can effectively channel material on Cha I, and possibly Cha II, but probably less efficiently on the quiescent Cha III cloud.
  • Numerical simulations have explored the possibility to form molecular clouds through either a quasi-static, self-gravitating mechanism or the collision of gas streams or lower-density clouds. They also quantitatively predict the distribution of matter at the transition from atomic to molecular gases. We aim to observationally test these models by studying the environment of W43, a molecular cloud complex near the tip of the Galactic long bar. Using Galaxy-wide HI and 12CO surveys we searched for gas flowing toward the W43 molecular cloud complex. We also estimated the HI and H2 mass surface densities to constrain the transition from atomic to molecular gas around and within W43. We found 3 cloud ensembles within the position-velocity diagrams of 12CO and HI gases. They are separated by 20km/s along the line of sight and extend into the 13CO velocity structure of W43. Since their velocity gradients are consistent with free-fall, they could be nearby clouds attracted by, and streaming toward, the W43 10^7Msun potential well. We show that the HI surface density, Sigma_HI=45-85Msun/pc2, does not reach any threshold level but increases when entering the 130pc-wide molecular complex previously defined. This suggests that an equilibrium between H2 formation and photodissociation has not yet been reached. The H2-to-HI ratio measured over the W43 region and its surroundings, R_H2~3.5, is high, indicating that most of the gas is already in molecular form in W43 and in structures several hundreds of parsecs downstream along the Scutum-Centaurus arm. The W43 molecular cloud complex may have formed, and in fact may still be accreting mass from the agglomeration of clouds. Already in the molecular-dominated regime, most of these clouds are streaming from the Scutum-Centaurus arm. This is in clear disagreement with quasi-static and steady-state models of molecular cloud formation.
  • We present the results of Herschel HOBYS photometric mapping combined with BIMA observations and additional archival data, and perform an in-depth study of the evolutionary phases of the star-forming clumps in W 48A and their surroundings. Age estimates for the compact sources were derived from bolometric luminosities and envelope masses, which were obtained from the dust continuum emission, and agree within an order of magnitude with age estimates from molecular line and radio data. The clumps in W 48A are linearly aligned by age (east-old to west-young): we find a ultra compact (UC) HII region, a young stellar object (YSO) with class II methanol maser emission, a YSO with a massive outflow, and finally the NH_2D prestellar cores from Pillai et al. This remarkable positioning reflects the (star) formation history of the region. We find that it is unlikely that the star formation in the W 48A molecular cloud was triggered by the UCHII region and discuss the Aquila supershell expansion as a mayor influence on the evolution of W 48A. We conclude that the combination of Herschel continuum data with interferometric molecular line and radio continuum data is important to derive trustworthy age estimates and interpret the origin of large scale structures through kinematic information.
  • Ionization feedback should impact the probability distribution function (PDF) of the column density around the ionized gas. We aim to quantify this effect and discuss its potential link to the Core and Initial Mass Function (CMF/IMF). We used in a systematic way Herschel column density maps of several regions observed within the HOBYS key program: M16, the Rosette and Vela C molecular cloud, and the RCW 120 H ii region. We fitted the column density PDFs of all clouds with two lognormal distributions, since they present a double-peak or enlarged shape in the PDF. Our interpretation is that the lowest part of the column density distribution describes the turbulent molecular gas while the second peak corresponds to a compression zone induced by the expansion of the ionized gas into the turbulent molecular cloud. The condensations at the edge of the ionized gas have a steep compressed radial profile, sometimes recognizable in the flattening of the power-law tail. This could lead to an unambiguous criterion able to disentangle triggered from pre-existing star formation. In the context of the gravo-turbulent scenario for the origin of the CMF/IMF, the double peaked/enlarged shape of the PDF may impact the formation of objects at both the low-mass and the high-mass end of the CMF/IMF. In particular a broader PDF is required by the gravo-turbulent scenario to fit properly the IMF with a reasonable initial Mach number for the molecular cloud. Since other physical processes (e.g. the equation of state and the variations among the core properties) have already been suggested to broaden the PDF, the relative importance of the different effects remains an open question.
  • Pillars and globules are present in many high-mass star-forming regions, such as the Eagle nebula (M16) and the Rosette molecular cloud, and understanding their origin will help characterize triggered star formation. The formation mechanisms of these structures are still being debated. Recent numerical simulations have shown how pillars can arise from the collapse of the shell in on itself and how globules can be formed from the interplay of the turbulent molecular cloud and the ionization from massive stars. The goal here is to test this scenario through recent observations of two massive star-forming regions, M16 and Rosette. The column density structure of the interface between molecular clouds and H ii regions was characterized using column density maps obtained from far-infrared imaging of the Herschel HOBYS key programme. Then, the DisPerSe algorithm was used on these maps to detect the compressed layers around the ionized gas and pillars in different evolutionary states. Finally, their velocity structure was investigated using CO data, and all observational signatures were tested against some distinct diagnostics established from simulations. The column density profiles have revealed the importance of compression at the edge of the ionized gas. The velocity properties of the structures, i.e. pillars and globules, are very close to what we predict from the numerical simulations. We have identified a good candidate of a nascent pillar in the Rosette molecular cloud that presents the velocity pattern of the shell collapsing on itself, induced by a high local curvature. Globules have a bulk velocity dispersion that indicates the importance of the initial turbulence in their formation, as proposed from numerical simulations. Altogether, this study re-enforces the picture of pillar formation by shell collapse and globule formation by the ionization of highly turbulent clouds.
  • We present first results from the Herschel Gould Belt survey for the B211/L1495 region in the Taurus molecular cloud. Thanks to their high sensitivity and dynamic range, the Herschel images reveal the structure of the dense, star-forming filament B211 with unprecedented detail, along with the presence of striations perpendicular to the filament and generally oriented along the magnetic field direction as traced by optical polarization vectors. Based on the column density and dust temperature maps derived from the Herschel data, we find that the radial density profile of the B211 filament approaches a power-law behavior {\rho} {\propto} r^(-2.0{\pm}0.4) at large radii and that the temperature profile exhibits a marked drop at small radii. The observed density and temperature profiles of the B211 filament are in good agreement with a theoretical model of a cylindrical filament undergoing gravitational contraction with a polytropic equation of state: P {\propto} {\rho}^{\gamma} and T {\propto} {\rho}^({\gamma}-1), with {\gamma}=0.97{\pm}0.01<1 (i.e. not strictly isothermal). The morphology of the column density map, where some of the perpendicular striations are apparently connected to the B211 filament, further suggests that the material may be accreting along the striations onto the main filament. The typical velocities expected for the infalling material in this picture are ~0.5-1 km/s, which are consistent with the existing kinematical constraints from previous CO observations.
  • We present APEX/P-ArT\'eMiS 450\mu m continuum observations of RCW 36 and the adjacent ridge, a high-mass high-column density filamentary structure at the centre of the Vela C molecular cloud. These observations, at higher resolution than Herschel's SPIRE camera, reveal clear fragmentation of the central star-forming ridge. Combined with PACS far-infrared and SPIRE sub-millimetre observations from the Herschel HOBYS project we build a high resolution column density map of the region mapped with P-ArT\'eMiS. We extract the radial density profile of the Vela C ridge which with a ~ 0.1pc central width is consistent with that measured for low-mass star-forming filaments in the Herschel Gould Belt survey. Direct comparison with Serpens South, of the Gould Belt Aquila complex, reveals many similarities between the two regions. Despite likely different formation mechanisms and histories, the Vela C ridge and Serpens South filament share common characteristics, including their filament central widths.
  • In order to characterise the cloud structures responsible for the formation of high-mass stars, we present Herschel observations of the DR21 environment. Maps of the column density and dust temperature unveil the structure of the DR21 ridge and several connected filaments. The ridge has column densities larger than 1e23/cm^2 over a region of 2.3 pc^2. It shows substructured column density profiles and branching into two major filaments in the north. The masses in the studied filaments range between 130 and 1400 Msun whereas the mass in the ridge is 15000 Msun. The accretion of these filaments onto the DR21 ridge, suggested by a previous molecular line study, could provide a continuous mass inflow to the ridge. In contrast to the striations seen in e.g., the Taurus region, these filaments are gravitationally unstable and form cores and protostars. These cores formed in the filaments potentially fall into the ridge. Both inflow and collisions of cores could be important to drive the observed high-mass star formation. The evolutionary gradient of star formation running from DR21 in the south to the northern branching is traced by decreasing dust temperature. This evolution and the ridge structure can be explained by two main filamentary components of the ridge that merged first in the south.
  • We present Herschel images from the HOBYS key program of the Eagle Nebula (M16) in the far-infrared and sub-millimetre, using the PACS and SPIRE cameras at 70{\mu}m, 160{\mu}m, 250{\mu}m, 350{\mu}m, 500{\mu}m. M16, home to the Pillars of Creation, is largely under the influence of the nearby NGC6611 high-mass star cluster. The Herschel images reveal a clear dust temperature gradient running away from the centre of the cavity carved by the OB cluster. We investigate the heating effect of NGC6611 on the entire M16 star-forming complex seen by Herschel including the diffuse cloud environment and the dense filamentary structures identified in this region. In addition, we interpret the three-dimensional geometry of M16 with respect to the nebula, its surrounding environment, and the NGC6611 cavity. The dust temperature and column density maps reveal a prominent eastern filament running north-south and away from the high-mass star-forming central region and the NGC6611 cluster, as well as a northern filament which extends around and away from the cluster. The dust temperature in each of these filaments decreases with increasing distance from the NGC6611 cluster, indicating a heating penetration depth of \sim 10 pc in each direction in 3 - 6 \times 10^{22} cm-2 column density filaments. We show that in high-mass star-forming regions OB clusters impact the temperature of future star-forming sites, modifying the initial conditions for collapse and effecting the evolutionary criteria of protostars developed from spectral energy distributions. Possible scenarios for the origin of the morphology seen in this region are discussed, including a western equivalent to the eastern filament, which was destroyed by the creation of the OB cluster and its subsequent winds and radiation.
  • We present a multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction algorithm called getsources. Although it has been designed primarily for use in the far-infrared surveys of Galactic star-forming regions with Herschel, the method can be applied to many other astronomical images. Instead of the traditional approach of extracting sources in the observed images, the new method analyzes fine spatial decompositions of original images across a wide range of scales and across all wavebands. It cleans those single-scale images of noise and background, and constructs wavelength-independent single-scale detection images that preserve information in both spatial and wavelength dimensions. Sources are detected in the combined detection images by following the evolution of their segmentation masks across all spatial scales. Measurements of the source properties are done in the original background-subtracted images at each wavelength; the background is estimated by interpolation under the source footprints and overlapping sources are deblended in an iterative procedure. In addition to the main catalog of sources, various catalogs and images are produced that aid scientific exploitation of the extraction results. We illustrate the performance of getsources on Herschel images by extracting sources in sub-fields of the Aquila and Rosette star-forming regions. The source extraction code and validation images with a reference extraction catalog are freely available.
  • For many years feedback processes generated by OB-stars in molecular clouds, including expanding ionization fronts, stellar winds, or UV-radiation, have been proposed to trigger subsequent star formation. However, hydrodynamic models including radiation and gravity show that UV-illumination has little or no impact on the global dynamical evolution of the cloud. The Rosette molecular cloud, irradiated by the NGC2244 cluster, is a template region for triggered star-formation, and we investigated its spatial and density structure by applying a curvelet analysis, a filament-tracing algorithm (DisPerSE), and probability density functions (PDFs) on Herschel column density maps, obtained within the HOBYS key program. The analysis reveals not only the filamentary structure of the cloud but also that all known infrared clusters except one lie at junctions of filaments, as predicted by turbulence simulations. The PDFs of sub-regions in the cloud show systematic differences. The two UV-exposed regions have a double-peaked PDF we interprete as caused by shock compression. The deviations of the PDF from the log-normal shape typically associated with low- and high-mass star-forming regions at Av~3-4m and 8-10m, respectively, are found here within the very same cloud. This shows that there is no fundamental difference in the density structure of low- and high-mass star-forming regions. We conclude that star-formation in Rosette - and probably in high-mass star-forming clouds in general - is not globally triggered by the impact of UV-radiation. Moreover, star formation takes place in filaments that arose from the primordial turbulent structure built up during the formation of the cloud. Clusters form at filament mergers, but star formation can be locally induced in the direct interaction zone between an expanding HII--region and the molecular cloud.
  • A growing body of evidence indicates that the formation of filaments in interstellar clouds is a key component of the star formation process. In this paper, we present new Herschel PACS and SPIRE observations of the B59 and Stem regions in the Pipe Nebula complex, revealing a rich, organized network of filaments. The asymmetric column density profiles observed for several filaments, along with the bow-like edge of B59, indicates that the Pipe Nebula is being compressed from its western side, most likely by the winds from the nearby Sco OB2 association. We suggest that this compressive flow has contributed to the formation of some of the observed filamentary structures. In B59, the only region of the entire Pipe complex showing star formation activity, the same compressive flow has likely enhanced the initial column density of the clump, allowing it to become globally gravitationally unstable. Although more speculative, we propose that gravity has also been responsible for shaping the converging filamentary pattern observed in B59. While the question of the relative impact of large-scale compression and gravity remains open in B59, large-scale compression appears to be a plausible mechanism for the initial formation of filamentary structures in the rest of the complex
  • We present recent results from the Herschel HOBYS guaranteed time key program of the Vela C andW48 star-forming complexes. We examine the column density distribution in Vela C, in particular focusing on the cloud structure using probability distribution functions, and characterise the star formation efficiency in W48.
  • The filament IRDC G035.39--00.33 in the W48 molecular complex is one of the darkest infrared clouds observed by \textit{Spitzer}. It has been observed by the PACS (70 and 160\,$\micron$) and SPIRE (250, 350, and 500\,$\micron$) cameras of the \textit{Herschel} Space Observatory as part of the W48 molecular cloud complex in the framework of the HOBYS key programme. The observations reveal a sample of 28 compact sources (deconvolved FWHM sizes $<$0.3 pc) complete down to $\sim$$5 \msun$ in G035.39--00.33 and its surroundings. Among them, 13 compact sources are massive dense cores with masses $>$$20 \msun$. The cloud characteristics we derive from the analysis of their spectral energy distributions are masses of $20-50 \msun$, sizes of 0.1--0.2 pc, and average densities of $2-20 \times 10^{5} \cmc$, which make these massive dense cores excellent candidates to form intermediate- to high-mass stars. Most of the massive dense cores are located inside the G035.39--00.33 ridge and host IR-quiet high-mass protostars. The large number of protostars found in this filament suggests that we are witnessing a mini-burst of star formation with an efficiency of $\sim$15% and a rate density of $\sim$$40 \msun\,$yr$^{-1}\,$kpc$^{-2}$ within $\sim$8 pc$^2$, a large area covering the full ridge. Part of the extended SiO emission observed towards G035.39--00.33 is not associated with obvious protostars and may originate from low-velocity shocks within converging flows, as advocated by previous studies.
  • We provide a first look at the results of the Herschel Gould Belt survey toward the IC5146 molecular cloud and present a preliminary analysis of the filamentary structure in this region. The column density map, derived from our 70-500 micron Herschel data, reveals a complex network of filaments, and confirms that these filaments are the main birth sites of prestellar cores. We analyze the column density profiles of 27 filaments and show that the underlying radial density profiles fall off as r^{-1.5} to r^{-2.5} at large radii. Our main result is that the filaments seem to be characterized by a narrow distribution of widths having a median value of 0.10 +- 0.03 pc, which is in stark contrast to a much broader distribution of central Jeans lengths. This characteristic width of ~0.1 pc corresponds to within a factor of ~2 to the sonic scale below which interstellar turbulence becomes subsonic in diffuse gas, supporting the argument that the filaments may form as a result of the dissipation of large-scale turbulence.
  • We summarize the first results from the Gould Belt survey, obtained toward the Aquila Rift and Polaris Flare regions during the 'science demonstration phase' of Herschel. Our 70-500 micron images taken in parallel mode with the SPIRE and PACS cameras reveal a wealth of filamentary structure, as well as numerous dense cores embedded in the filaments. Between ~ 350 and 500 prestellar cores and ~ 45-60 Class 0 protostars can be identified in the Aquila field, while ~ unbound starless cores and no protostars are observed in the Polaris field. The prestellar core mass function (CMF) derived for the Aquila region bears a strong resemblance to the stellar initial mass function (IMF), already confirming the close connection between the CMF and the IMF with much better statistics than earlier studies. Comparing and contrasting our Herschel results in Aquila and Polaris, we propose an observationally-driven scenario for core formation according to which complex networks of long, thin filaments form first within molecular clouds, and then the densest filaments fragment into a number of prestellar cores via gravitational instability.
  • We present a preliminary analysis of the small-scale structure found in new 70-520 micron continuum maps of the Rosette molecular cloud (RMC), obtained with the SPIRE and PACS instruments of the Herschel Space Observatory. We find 473 clumps within the RMC using a new structure identification algorithm, with sizes up to ~1.0 pc in diameter. A comparison with recent Spitzer maps reveals that 371 clumps are "starless" (without an associated young stellar object), while 102 are "protostellar." Using the respective values of dust temperature, we determine the clumps have masses (M_C) over the range -0.75 <= log (M_C/M_sun) <= 2.50. Linear fits to the high-mass tails of the resulting clump mass spectra (CMS) have slopes that are consistent with those found for high-mass clumps identified in CO emission by other groups.
  • Our PACS and SPIRE images of the Aquila Rift and part of the Polaris Flare regions, taken during the science demonstration phase of Herschel discovered fascinating, omnipresent filamentary structures that appear to be physically related to compact cores. We briefly describe a new multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction method used to detect objects and measure their parameters in our Herschel images. All of the extracted starless cores (541 in Aquila and 302 in Polaris) appear to form in the long and very narrow filaments. With its combination of the far-IR resolution and sensitivity, Herschel directly reveals the filaments in which the dense cores are embedded; the filaments are resolved and have deconvolved widths of 35 arcsec in Aquila and 59 arcsec in Polaris (9000 AU in both regions). Our first results of observations with Herschel enable us to suggest that in general dense cores may originate in a process of fragmentation of complex networks of long, thin filaments, likely formed as a result of an interplay between gravity, interstellar turbulence, and magnetic fields. To unravel the roles of the processes, one has to obtain additional kinematic and polarization information; these follow-up observations are planned.