• We report first results from a large project to measure black hole (BH) mass in high accretion rate active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Such objects may be different from other AGNs in being powered by slim accretion disks and showing saturated accretion luminosities, but both are not yet fully understood. The results are part of a large reverberation mapping (RM) campaign using the 2.4-m Shangri-La telescope at the Yunnan Observatory in China. The goals are to investigate the gas distribution near the BH and the properties of the central accretion disks, to measure BH mass and Eddington ratios, and to test the feasibility of using such objects as a new type of cosmological candles. The paper presents results for three objects, Mrk 335, Mrk 142 and IRAS F12397+3333 with H$\beta$ time lags relative to the 5100\AA\ continuum of $10.6^{+1.7}_{-2.9}$, $6.4^{+0.8}_{-2.2}$ and $11.4^{+2.9}_{-1.9}$ days, respectively. The corresponding BH masses are $(8.3_{-3.2}^{+2.6})\times 10^6M_{\odot}$, $(3.4_{-1.2}^{+0.5})\times 10^6M_{\odot}$ and $(7.5_{-4.1}^{+4.3})\times 10^6M_{\odot}$, and the lower limits on the Eddington ratios 0.6, 2.3, and 4.6 for the minimal radiative efficiency of 0.038. Mrk 142 and IRAS F12397+333 (extinction corrected) clearly deviate from the currently known relation between H$\beta$ lag and continuum luminosity. The three Eddington ratios are beyond the values expected in thin accretion disks and two of them are the largest measured so far among objects with RM-based BH masses. We briefly discuss implications for slim disks, BH growth and cosmology.
  • We present a spectroscopic catalog of 67082 M dwarfs from the LAMOST pilot survey. For each spectrum of the catalog, spectral subtype, radial velocity, equivalent width of H${\alpha}$, a number of prominent molecular band indices and the metal sensitive parameter $\zeta$ are provided . Spectral subtype have been estimated by a remedied Hammer program (Original Hammer: Covey et al. 2007), in which indices are reselected to obtain more accurate auto-classified spectral subtypes. All spectra in this catalog have been visually inspected to confirm the spectral subtypes. Radial velocities have been well measured by our developed program which uses cross-correlation method and estimates uncertainty of radial velocity as well. We also examine the magnetic activity properties of M dwarfs traced by H${\alpha}$ emission line. The molecular band indices included in this catalog are temperature or metallicity sensitive and can be used for future analysis of the physical properties of M dwarfs. The catalog is available on the website \url{http://sciwiki.lamost.org/MCatalogPilot/}.
  • Super-Eddington accreting massive black holes (SEAMBHs) reach saturated luminosities above a certain accretion rate due to photon trapping and advection in slim accretion disks. We show that these SEAMBHs could provide a new tool for estimating cosmological distances if they are properly identified by hard X-ray observations, in particular by the slope of their 2-10 keV continuum. To verify this idea we obtained black hole mass estimates and X-ray data for a sample of 60 narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies that we consider to be the most promising SEAMBH candidates. We demonstrate that the distances derived by the new method for the objects in the sample get closer to the standard luminosity distances as the hard X-ray continuum gets steeper. The results allow us to analyze the requirements for using the method in future samples of active black holes and to demonstrate that the expected uncertainty, given large enough samples, can make them into a useful, new cosmological ruler.
  • (abridged) We study the consequence of star formation (SF) in an self-gravity dominated accretion disk in quasars. The warm skins of the SF disk are governed by the radiation from the inner part of the accretion disk to form Compton atmosphere (CAS). The CAS are undergoing four phases to form broad line regions. Phase I is the duration of pure accumulation supplied by the SF disk. During phase II clouds begin to form due to line cooling and sink to the SF disk. Phase III is a period of preventing clouds from sinking to the SF disk through dynamic interaction between clouds and the CAS. Finally, phase IV is an inevitable collapse of the entire CAS through line cooling. This CAS evolution drives the episodic appearance of BLRs. Geometry and dynamics of BLRs can be self-consistently derived from the thermal instability of the CAS during phases II and III by linear analysis. The metallicity gradient of SF disk gives rise to different properties of clouds from outer to inner part of BLRs. We find that clouds have column density N_H < 10^22cm^{-2} in the metal-rich regions whereas they have N_H > 10^22 cm^{-2} in the metal-poor regions. The metal-rich clouds compose the high ionization line (HIL) regions whereas the metal-poor clouds are in low ionization line (LIL) regions. Metal-rich clouds in HIL regions will be blown away by radiation pressure, forming the observed outflows. The LIL regions are episodic due to the mass cycle of clouds with the CAS in response to continuous injection by the SF disk, giving rise to different types of AGNs. Based on SDSS quasar spectra, we identify a spectral sequence in light of emission line equivalent width from Phase I to IV. A key phase in the episodic appearance of the BLRs is bright type II AGNs with no or only weak BLRs. We discuss observational implications and tests of the theoretical predictions of this model.