• White dwarf WD 1145+017 is orbited by several clouds of dust, possibly emanating from actively disintegrating bodies. These dust clouds reveal themselves through deep, broad, and evolving transits in the star's light curve. Here, we report two epochs of multi-wavelength photometric observations of WD 1145+017, including several filters in the optical, K$_\mathrm{s}$ and 4.5 $\mu$m bands in 2016 and 2017. The observed transit depths are different at these wavelengths. However, after correcting for excess dust emission at K$_\mathrm{s}$ and 4.5 $\mu$m, we find the transit depths for the white dwarf itself are the same at all wavelengths, at least to within the observational uncertainties of $\sim$5%-10%. From this surprising result, and under the assumption of low optical depth dust clouds, we conclude that there is a deficit of small particles (with radii $s \lesssim$ 1.5 $\mu$m) in the transiting material. We propose a model wherein only large particles can survive the high equilibrium temperature environment corresponding to 4.5 hr orbital periods around WD 1145+017, while small particles sublimate rapidly. In addition, we evaluate dust models that are permitted by our measurements of infrared emission.
  • We present the discovery and follow-up observations of the second known variable warm DQ white dwarf OW J175358.85-310728.9 (OW J1753-3107). OW J1753-3107 is the brightest of any of the currently known warm or hot DQ and was discovered in the OmegaWhite Survey as exhibiting optical variations on a period of 35.5452 (2) mins, with no evidence for other periods in its light curves. This period has remained constant over the last two years and a single-period sinusoidal model provides a good fit for all follow-up light curves. The spectrum consists of a very blue continuum with strong absorption lines of neutral and ionised carbon, a broad He I 4471 A line, and possibly weaker hydrogen lines. The C I lines are Zeeman split, and indicate the presence of a strong magnetic field. Using spectral Paschen-Back model descriptions, we determine that OW J1753-3107 exhibits the following physical parameters: T_eff = 15430 K, log(g) = 9.0, log(N(C)/N(He)) = -1.2, and the mean magnetic field strength is B_z =2.1 MG. This relatively low temperature and carbon abundance (compared to the expected properties of hot DQs) is similar to that seen in the other warm DQ SDSS J1036+6522. Although OW J1753-3107 appears to be a twin of SDSS J1036+6522, it exhibits a modulation on a period slightly longer than the dominant period in SDSS J1036+6522 and has a higher carbon abundance. The source of variations is uncertain, but they are believed to originate from the rotation of the magnetic white dwarf.
  • The Kuiper Belt of our solar system is a source of short-period comets that may have delivered water and other volatiles to Earth and the other terrestrial planets. However, the distribution of water and other volatiles in extrasolar planetary systems is largely unknown. We report the discovery of an accretion of a Kuiper-Belt-Object analog onto the atmosphere of the white dwarf WD 1425+540. The heavy elements C, N, O, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, and Ni are detected, with nitrogen observed for the first time in extrasolar planetary debris. The nitrogen mass fraction is $\sim$ 2\%, comparable to that in comet Halley and higher than in any other known solar system object. The lower limit to the accreted mass is $\sim$ 10$^{22}$ g, which is about one hundred thousand times the typical mass of a short-period comet. In addition, WD 1425+540 has a wide binary companion, which could facilitate perturbing a Kuiper-Belt-Object analog into the white dwarf's tidal radius. This finding shows that analogs to objects in our Kuiper Belt exist around other stars and could be responsible for the delivery of volatiles to terrestrial planets beyond
  • We present spectroscopic observations of the dust- and gas-enshrouded, polluted, single white dwarf star SDSSJ104341.53+085558.2 (hereafter SDSSJ1043+0855). Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph far-ultraviolet spectra combined with deep Keck HIRES optical spectroscopy reveal the elements C, O, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Ca, Fe, and Ni and enable useful limits for Sc, Ti, V, Cr, and Mn in the photosphere of SDSSJ1043+0855. From this suite of elements we determine that the parent body being accreted by SDSSJ1043+0855 is similar to the silicate Moon or the outer layers of Earth in that it is rocky and iron-poor. Combining this with comparison to other heavily polluted white dwarf stars, we are able to identify the material being accreted by SDSSJ1043+0855 as likely to have come from the outermost layers of a differentiated object. Furthermore, we present evidence that some polluted white dwarfs (including SDSSJ1043+0855) allow us to examine the structure of differentiated extrasolar rocky bodies. Enhanced levels of carbon in the body polluting SDSSJ1043+0855 relative to the Earth-Moon system can be explained with a model where a significant amount of the accreted rocky minerals took the form of carbonates; specifically, through this model the accreted material could be up to 9% calcium-carbonate by mass.
  • We present the "Montreal White Dwarf Database" (MWDD), an accessible database with sortable/filterable table and interactive plots that will, when fully completed, allow the community to explore the physical properties of all white dwarfs ever analyzed by the Montreal group, as well as display data and analyses from the literature. We present its current capability and show how it will continuously be updated to instantly reflect improvements made on both the theoretical and observational fronts.
  • We report the discovery of a subtle infrared excess associated with the young white dwarf EC\,05365--4749 at 3.35 and 4.6\,$\mu$m. Follow-up spectroscopic observations are consistent with a hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf of effective temperature 22\,800\,K and log [\emph{g} (\,cm\,s$^{-2}$) ] = 8.19. High resolution spectroscopy reveals atmospheric metal pollution with logarithmic abundances of [Mg/H] = --5.36 and [Ca/H] = --5.75, confirming the white dwarf is actively accreting from a metal-rich source with an intriguing abundance pattern. We find that the infrared excess is well modeled by a flat, opaque debris disk, though disk parameters are not well constrained by the small number of infrared excess points. We further demonstrate that relaxing the assumption of a circular dusty debris disk to include elliptical disks expands the widths of acceptable disks, adding an alternative interpretation to the subtle infrared excesses commonly observed around young white dwarfs.
  • We present high-speed photometric observations of ZZ Ceti white dwarf candidates drawn from the spectroscopic survey of bright DA stars from the Villanova White Dwarf Catalog by Gianninas et al., and from the recent spectroscopic survey of white dwarfs within 40 parsecs of the Sun by Limoges et al. We report the discovery of six new ZZ Ceti pulsators from these surveys, and several photometrically constant DA white dwarfs, which we then use to refine the location of the ZZ Ceti instability strip.
  • Using Keck/HIRES, we report abundances of 11 different elements heavier than helium in the spectrum of Ton 345, a white dwarf that has accreted one of its own minor planets. This particular extrasolar planetesimal which was at least 60% as massive as Vesta appears to have been carbon-rich and water-poor; we suggest it was compositionally similar to those Kuiper Belt Objects with relatively little ice.
  • We present the discovery of an unusual, tidally-distorted extremely low mass white dwarf (WD) with nearly solar metallicity. Radial velocity measurements confirm that this is a compact binary with an orbital period of 2.6975 hrs and a velocity semi-amplitude of K = 108.7 km/s. Analysis of the hydrogen Balmer lines yields an effective temperature of Teff = 8380 K and a surface gravity of log g = 6.21 that in turn indicate a mass of M = 0.16 Msol and a cooling age of 4.2 Gyr. In addition, a detailed analysis of the observed metal lines yields abundances of log Mg/H = -3.90, log Ca/H = -5.80, log Ti/H = -6.10, log Cr/H = -5.60, and log Fe/H = -4.50, similar to the sun. We see no evidence of a debris disk from which these metals would be accreted though the possibility cannot entirely be ruled out. Other potential mechanisms to explain the presence of heavy elements are discussed. Finally, we expect this system to ultimately undergo unstable mass transfer and merge to form a ~0.3-0.6 Msol WD in a few Gyr.
  • Current scenarios for the evolution of interacting close binaries - such as cataclysmic variables (CVs) - rely mainly on our understanding of low-mass star angular momentum loss (AML) mechanisms. The coupling of stellar wind with its magnetic field, i.e., magnetic braking, is the most promising mechanism to drive AML in these stars. There are basically two properties driving magnetic braking: the stellar magnetic field and the stellar wind. Understanding the mechanisms that drive AML therefore requires a comprehensive understanding of these two properties. RRCae is a well-known nearby (d=20pc) eclipsing DA+M binary with an orbital period of P=7.29h. The system harbors a metal-rich cool white dwarf (WD) and a highly active M-dwarf locked in synchronous rotation. The metallicity of the WD suggests that wind accretion is taking place, which provides a good opportunity to obtain the mass-loss rate of the M-dwarf component. We analyzed multi-epoch time-resolved high-resolution spectra of RRCae in search for traces of magnetic activity and accretion. We selected a number of well-known activity indicators and studied their short and long-term behavior. Indirect-imaging tomographic techniques were also applied to provide the surface brightness distribution of the magnetically active M-dwarf, and reveals a polar feature similar to those observed in fast-rotating solar-type stars. The blue part of the spectrum was modeled using a atmosphere model to constrain the WD properties and its metal enrichment. The latter was used to improve the determination of the mass-accretion rate from the M-dwarf wind. The presence of metals in the WD spectrum suggests that this component arises from accretion of the M-dwarf wind. A model fit to the WD gives Teff=(7260+/-250)K and logg=(7.8+/-0.1) dex with a metallicity of <log[X/Xsun]>=(-2.8+/-0.1)dex, and a mass-accretion rate of dotMacc=(7+/-2)x1e-16Msun/yr.
  • A surprisingly large fraction (70%) of hot, carbon dominated atmosphere (DQ) white dwarfs are magnetic and/or photometrically variable on short timescales up to ~1000 s. However, here we show that the hot DQ magnetic white dwarf SDSS J000555.90-100213.5 is photometrically variable by 11% on a longer timescale, with a period of 2.110 +/- 0.045 days. We find no evidence of the target fluctuating on short timescales at an amplitude of <+/-0.5%. Short period hot DQ white dwarfs have been interpreted as non-radial pulsators, but in the case of SDSS J0005-1002, it is more likely that the variability is due to the magnetic hot DQ white dwarf rotating. We suggest that some hot DQ white dwarfs, varying on short timescales, should be more carefully examined to ascertain whether the variability is due to rotation rather than pulsation. All hot DQs should be monitored for long period modulations as an indicator of rotation and magnetism.
  • EGB 6 is an ancient, low-surface-brightness planetary nebula. The central star, also cataloged as PG 0950+139, is a very hot DAOZ white dwarf (WD) with an apparent M dwarf companion, unresolved from the ground but detected initially through excesses in the JHK bands. Its kinematics indicates membership in the Galactic disk population. Inside of EGB 6 is an extremely dense emission knot -- completely unexpected since significant mass loss from the WD should have ceased ~10^5 y ago. The electron density of the compact nebula is very high (2.2x10^6 cm^-3), as indicated by collisional de-excitation of forbidden emission lines. Hubble Space Telescope imaging and grism spectroscopy are reported here. These resolve the WD and apparent dM companion -- at a separation of 0."166, or a projected 96(+204,-45) AU at the estimated distance of 576(+1224, -271) pc (using the V magnitude). Much to our surprise, we found that the compact emission nebula is superposed on the dM companion, far from the photoionizing radiation of the WD. Moreover, a a striking mid-infrared excess has recently been reported in Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS bands, best fit with two dust shells. The derived ratio L_IR/L_WD = 2.7 x 10^-4 is the largest yet found for any WD or planetary nucleus. The compact nebula has maintained its high density for over three decades. We discuss two possible explanations for the origin and confinement of the compact nebula, neither of which is completely satisfactory. This leaves the genesis and confinement of the compact nebula an astrophysical puzzle, yet similar examples appear in the literature.
  • This paper presents new observations of the planet-hosting, visual binary GJ 86 (HR 637) using the Hubble Space Telescope. Ultraviolet and optical imaging with WFC3 confirms the stellar companion is a degenerate star and indicates the binary semimajor axis is larger than previous estimates, with a > 28 AU. Optical STIS spectroscopy of the secondary reveals a helium-rich white dwarf with C2 absorption bands and Teff = 8180 K, thus making the binary system rather similar to Procyon. Based on the 10.8 pc distance, the companion has 0.59 Msun and descended from a main-sequence A star of 1.9 Msun with an original orbital separation a > 14 AU. If the giant planet is coplanar with the binary, the mass of GJ 86Ab is between 4.4 and 4.7 MJup. The similarity of GJ 86 and Procyon prompted a re-analysis of the white dwarf in the latter system, with the tentative conclusion that Procyon hosts a planetesimal population. The periastron distance in Procyon is 20% smaller than in alpha Cen AB, but the metal-enriched atmosphere of Procyon B indicates that the planet formation process minimally attained 25 km bodies, if not small planets as in alpha Cen.
  • We present a new catalog of spectroscopically-confirmed white dwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog. We find 20,407 white dwarf spectra, representing 19,712 stars, and provide atmospheric model fits to 14,120 DA and 1011 DB white dwarf spectra from 12,843 and 923 stars, respectively. These numbers represent a more than factor of two increase in the total number of white dwarf stars from the previous SDSS white dwarf catalog based on DR4 data. Our distribution of subtypes varies from previous catalogs due to our more conservative, manual classifications of each star in our catalog, supplementing our automatic fits. In particular, we find a large number of magnetic white dwarf stars whose small Zeeman splittings mimic increased Stark broadening that would otherwise result in an overestimated log(g) if fit as a non-magnetic white dwarf. We calculate mean DA and DB masses for our clean, non-magnetic sample and find the DB mean mass is statistically larger than that for the DAs.
  • We present near- and mid-infrared photometry and spectroscopy from PAIRITEL, IRTF, and Spitzer of a metallicity-unbiased sample of 117 cool, hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarfs from the Palomar-Green survey and find five with excess radiation in the infrared, translating to a 4.3+2.7-1.2% frequency of debris disks. This is slightly higher than, but consistent with the results of previous surveys. Using an initial-final mass relation, we apply this result to the progenitor stars of our sample and conclude that 1-7Msol stars have at least a 4.3% chance of hosting planets; an indirect probe of the intermediate-mass regime eluding conventional exoplanetary detection methods. Alternatively, we interpret this result as a limit on accretion timescales as a fraction of white dwarf cooling ages; white dwarfs accrete debris from several generations of disks for ~10Myr. The average total mass accreted by these stars ranges from that of 200km asteroids to Ceres-sized objects, indicating that white dwarfs accrete moons and dwarf planets as well as Solar System asteroid analogues.
  • We present new spectroscopic observations of the polluted, dusty, helium-dominated atmosphere white dwarf star HE1349-2305. Optical spectroscopy reveals weak CaII infrared triplet emission indicating that metallic gas debris orbits and is accreted by the white dwarf. Atmospheric abundances are measured for magnesium and silicon while upper limits for iron and oxygen are derived from the available optical spectroscopy. HE1349-2305 is the first gas disk-hosting white dwarf star identified amongst previously known polluted white dwarfs. Further characterization of the parent body polluting this star will require ultraviolet spectroscopy.
  • By selecting astrometric and photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the L{\'e}pine & Shara Proper Motion North Catalog (LSPM-North), the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and the USNO-B1.0 catalog, we use a succession of methods to isolate white dwarf candidates for follow-up spectroscopy. Our methods include: reduced proper motion diagram cuts, color cuts, and atmospheric model adherence. We present spectroscopy of 26 white dwarfs obtained from the CTIO 4m and APO 3.5m telescopes. Additionally, we confirm 28 white dwarfs with spectra available in the SDSS DR7 database but unpublished elsewhere, presenting a total of 54 WDs. We label one of these as a recovered WD while the remaining 53 are new discoveries. We determine physical parameters and estimate distances based on atmospheric model analyses. Three new white dwarfs are modeled to lie within 25 pc. Two additional white dwarfs are confirmed to be metal-polluted (DAZ). Follow-up time series photometry confirms another object to be a pulsating ZZ Ceti white dwarf.
  • We present a new model atmosphere analysis of the most metal contaminated white dwarf known, the DBZ SDSS J073842.56+183509.06. Using new high resolution spectroscopic observations taken with Keck and Magellan, we determine precise atmospheric parameters and measure abundances of 14 elements heavier than helium. We also report new Spitzer mid-infrared photometric data that are used to better constrain the properties of the debris disk orbiting this star. Our detailed analysis, which combines data taken from 7 different observational facilities (GALEX, Gemini, Keck, Magellan, MMT, SDSS and Spitzer) clearly demonstrate that J0738+1835 is accreting large amounts of rocky terrestrial-like material that has been tidally disrupted into a debris disk. We estimate that the body responsible for the photospheric metal contamination was at least as large Ceres, but was much drier, with less than 1% of the mass contained in the form of water ice, indicating that it formed interior to the snow line around its parent star. We also find a correlation between the abundances (relative to Mg and bulk Earth) and the condensation temperature; refractory species are clearly depleted while the more volatile elements are possibly enhanced. This could be the signature of a body that formed in a lower temperature environment than where Earth formed. Alternatively, we could be witnessing the remains of a differentiated body that lost a large part of its outer layers.
  • To search for circumstellar disks around evolved stars, we targeted roughly 100 DA white dwarfs from the Palomar Green survey with the Peters Automated Infrared Imaging Telescope (PAIRITEL). Here we report the discovery of a debris disk around one of these targets, the pulsating white dwarf PG 1541+651 (KX Draconis, hereafter PG1541). We detect a significant flux excess around PG1541 in the K-band. Follow-up near-infrared spectroscopic observations obtained at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and photometric observations with the warm Spitzer Space Telescope confirm the presence of a warm debris disk within 0.13-0.36 Rsun (11-32x the stellar radius) at an inclination angle of 60deg. At Teff = 11880 K, PG1541 is almost a twin of the DAV white dwarf G29-38, which also hosts a debris disk. All previously known dusty white dwarfs are of the DAZ/DBZ spectral type due to accretion of metals from the disk. High-resolution optical spectroscopy is needed to search for metal absorption lines in PG1541 and to constrain the accretion rate from the disk. PG1541 is only 55 pc away from the Sun and the discovery of its disk in our survey demonstrates that our knowledge of the nearby dusty white dwarf population is far from complete.
  • I present a broad historical review on cool white dwarf stars with carbon and/or oxygen detected at the photosphere. This book chapter covers the observational signatures, physical properties, and evolution of DQ, DBQ and Hot DQ white dwarfs, and also present an overview of the main challenges that future investigations of these types of object should try to address.
  • White dwarf stars are traditionally found to have surface compositions made primarily of hydrogen or helium. However, a new family has recently been uncovered, the so-called Hot DQ white dwarfs, which have surface compositions dominated by carbon and oxygen with little or no trace of hydrogen and helium (Dufour et al. 2007, 2008, 2010). Deriving precise atmospheric parameters for these objects (such as the effective temperature and the surface gravity) requires detailed modeling of spectral line profiles. Stark broadening parameters are of crucial importance in that context. We present preliminary results from our new generation of model atmosphere including the latest Stark broadening calculations for CII lines and discuss the implications as well as future work that remains to be done.
  • The presence of elements heavier than helium in white dwarf atmospheres is often a signpost for the existence of rocky objects that currently or previously orbited these stars. We have measured the abundances of various elements in the hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarfs G149-28 and NLTT 43806. In comparison with other white dwarfs with atmospheres polluted by heavy elements, NLTT 43806 is substantially enriched in aluminum but relatively poor in iron. We compare the relative abundances of Al and eight other heavy elements seen in NLTT 43806 with the elemental composition of bulk Earth, with simulated extrasolar rocky planets, with solar system meteorites, with the atmospheric compositions of other polluted white dwarfs, and with the outer layers of the Moon and Earth. Best agreement is found with a model that involves accretion of a mixture of terrestrial crust and upper mantle material onto NLTT 43806. The implication is that NLTT 43806 is orbited by a differentiated rocky planet, perhaps quite similar to Earth, that has suffered a collision that stripped away some of its outer layers.
  • We report the identification of 26 cool DZ white dwarfs that lie across and below the main sequence in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) u-g vs. g-r two-color diagram; 21 of these stars are new discoveries. The sample was identified by visual inspection of all spectra of objects that fall below the main sequence in the two-color diagram, as well as by an automated search for characteristic spectral features over a large area in color space that included the main sequence. The spectra and photometry provided by the SDSS project are interpreted with model atmospheres, including all relevant metals. Effective temperatures and element abundances are determined, while the surface gravity has to be assumed and was fixed at the canonical value of log g = 8. These stars represent the extension of the well-known DZ sequence towards cooler temperatures and fill the gap around Teff = 6500 K present in a previous study. The metal abundances are similar to those in the hotter DZ, but the lowest abundances are missing, probably because of our selection procedures. The interpretation is complicated in terms of the accretion/diffusion scenario, because we do not know if accretion is still occurring or has ended long ago. Independent of that uncertainty, the masses of the metals currently present in the convection zones - and thus an absolute lower limit of the total accreted masses - of these stars are similar to the largest asteroids in our solar system.
  • We present an analysis of the ultraviolet light curves of five Hot DQ white dwarfs recently observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These light curves were constructed by extracting the time-tag information from the FUV and NUV spectroscopic data. Single-color light curves were thus produced in 60 s time bins. The Fourier analysis of these data successfully recovers the main pulsation modes of the three stars previously known to be variable from ground-based observations. We also report the discovery of pulsations in another object, SDSS J1153+0056, making it only the fifth member of the new class of variable Hot DQ stars, and the first pulsating white dwarf to be discovered from space-based observations. The relatively high amplitudes of the modes observed in the FUV -- 2 to 4 times that observed in the optical -- as well as the high fraction of stars variable in our sample suggest that most, if not all, Hot DQ white dwarfs might be pulsating at some level when observed at high enough sensitivity. Our results also underline the vast potential of the time-tag capability of the HST/COS combination.
  • An accumulation of multi-epoch, high-resolution, optical spectra reveal that the nearby star G77-50 is a very cool DAZ white dwarf externally polluted by Mg, Fe, Al, Ca, and possibly Na, Cr, Mn. The metallic and hydrogen absorption features all exhibit multiple components consistent with Zeeman splitting in a B~120kG magnetic field. Ultraviolet through infrared photometry combined with trigonometric parallaxes yield Teff=5310K, M=0.60Msun, and a cooling age of 5.2Gyr. The space velocity of the white dwarf suggests possible membership in the Galactic thick disk, consistent with an estimated total age of 8.6Gyr. G77-50 is spectrally similar to G165-7 and LHS 2534; these three cool white dwarfs comprise a small group exhibiting both metals and magnetism. The photospheric metals indicate accretion of rocky debris similar to that contained in asteroids, but the cooling age implies a remnant planetary system should be stable. A possibility for G77-50 and similarly old, polluted white dwarfs is a recent stellar encounter that dynamically rejuvenated the system from the outside-in. Metal abundance measurements for these cooler white dwarfs have the potential to distinguish material originating in outer region planetesimals injected via fly-by. If common envelope evolution can generate magnetic fields in white dwarfs, then G77-50 and its classmates may have cannibalized an inner giant planet during prior evolution, with their metals originating in terrestrial bodies formed further out. Although speculative, this scenario can be ruled out if terrestrial planet formation is prohibited in systems where a giant planet has migrated to the inner region nominally engulfed during the post-main sequence.