• We present results from the KMOS lensing survey-KLENS which is exploiting gravitational lensing to study the kinematics of 24 star forming galaxies at $1.4<z<3.5$ with a median mass of $\rm log(M_\star/M_\odot)=9.6$ and median star formation rate (SFR) of $\rm 7.5\,M_\odot\,yr^{-1}$. We find that 25% of these low-mass/low-SFR galaxies are rotation dominated, while the majority of our sample shows no velocity gradient. When combining our data with other surveys, we find that the fraction of rotation dominated galaxies increases with the stellar mass, and decreases for galaxies with a positive offset from the main sequence. We also investigate the evolution of the intrinsic velocity dispersion, $\sigma_0$, as a function of the redshift, $z$, and stellar mass, $\rm M_\star$, assuming galaxies in quasi-equilibrium (Toomre Q parameter equal to 1). From the $z-\sigma_0$ relation, we find that the redshift evolution of the velocity dispersion is mostly expected for massive galaxies ($\rm log(M_\star/M_\odot)>10$). We derive a $\rm M_\star-\sigma_0$ relation, using the Tully-Fisher relation, which highlights that a different evolution of the velocity dispersion is expected depending on the stellar mass, with lower velocity dispersions for lower masses, and an increase for higher masses, stronger at higher redshift. The observed velocity dispersions from this work and from comparison samples spanning $0<z<3.5$ appear to follow this relation, except at higher redshift ($z>2$), where we observe higher velocity dispersions for low masses ($\rm log(M_\star/M_\odot)\sim 9.6$) and lower velocity dispersions for high masses ($\rm log(M_\star/M_\odot)\sim 10.9$) than expected. This discrepancy could, for instance, suggest that galaxies at high-$z$ do not satisfy the stability criterion, or that the adopted parametrisation of the specific star formation rate and molecular properties fail at high redshift.
  • We make use of SHARDS, an ultra-deep (<26.5AB) galaxy survey that provides optical photo-spectra at resolution R~50, via medium band filters (FWHM~150A). This dataset is combined with ancillary optical and NIR fluxes to constrain the dust attenuation law in the rest-frame NUV region of star-forming galaxies within the redshift window 1.5<z<3. We focus on the NUV bump strength (B) and the total-to-selective extinction ratio (Rv), targeting a sample of 1,753 galaxies. By comparing the data with a set of population synthesis models coupled to a parametric dust attenuation law, we constrain Rv and B, as well as the colour excess, E(B-V). We find a correlation between Rv and B, that can be interpreted either as a result of the grain size distribution, or a variation of the dust geometry among galaxies. According to the former, small dust grains are associated with a stronger NUV bump. The latter would lead to a range of clumpiness in the distribution of dust within the interstellar medium of star-forming galaxies. The observed wide range of NUV bump strengths can lead to a systematic in the interpretation of the UV slope ($\beta$) typically used to characterize the dust content. In this study we quantify these variations, concluding that the effects are $\Delta\beta$~0.4.
  • Imaging with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow for observing the bulk of distant galaxies at the epoch of reionisation. The recovery of their properties, such as age, color excess E(B-V), specific star formation rate (sSFR) and stellar mass, will mostly rely on spectral energy distribution fitting, based on the data provided by JWST's two imager cameras, namely the Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and the Mid Infrared Imager (MIRI). In this work we analyze the effect of choosing different combinations of NIRCam and MIRI broad-band filters, from 0.6 {\mu}m to 7.7 {\mu}m, on the recovery of these galaxy properties. We performed our tests on a sample of 1542 simulated galaxies, with known input properties, at z=7-10. We found that, with only 8 NIRCam broad-bands, we can recover the galaxy age within 0.1 Gyr and the color excess within 0.06 mag for 70% of the galaxies. Besides, the stellar masses and sSFR are recovered within 0.2 and 0.3 dex, respectively, at z=7-9. Instead, at z=10, no NIRCam band traces purely the {\lambda}> 4000 {\AA} regime and the percentage of outliers in stellar mass (sSFR) increases by > 20% (> 90%), in comparison to z=9. The MIRI F560W and F770W bands are crucial to improve the stellar mass and the sSFR estimation at z=10. When nebular emission lines are present, deriving correct galaxy properties is challenging, at any redshift and with any band combination. In particular, the stellar mass is systematically overestimated in up to 0.3 dex on average with NIRCam data alone and including MIRI observations improves only marginally the estimation.
  • Using the exquisite depth of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF12 programme) dataset, we explore the ongoing assembly of the outermost regions of the most massive galaxies ($\rm M_{\rm stellar}\geq$ 5$\times$10$^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$) at $z \leq$ 1. The outskirts of massive objects, particularly Early-Types Galaxies (ETGs), are expected to suffer a dramatic transformation across cosmic time due to continuous accretion of small galaxies. HUDF imaging allows us to study this process at intermediate redshifts in 6 massive galaxies, exploring the individual surface brightness profiles out to $\sim$25 effective radii. We find that 5-20\% of the total stellar mass for the galaxies in our sample is contained within 10 $< R <$ 50 kpc. These values are in close agreement with numerical simulations, and higher than those reported for local late-type galaxies ($\lesssim$5\%). The fraction of stellar mass stored in the outer envelopes/haloes of Massive Early-Type Galaxies increases with decreasing redshift, being 28.7\% at $< z > =$ 0.1, 15.1\% at $< z > =$ 0.65 and 3.5\% at $< z > =$ 2. The fraction of mass in diffuse features linked with ongoing minor merger events is $>$ 1-2\%, very similar to predictions based on observed close pair counts. Therefore, the results for our small albeit meaningful sample suggest that the size and mass growth of the most massive galaxies have been solely driven by minor and major merging from $z =$ 1 to today.
  • The determination of galaxy redshifts in James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)'s blank-field surveys will mostly rely on photometric estimates, based on the data provided by JWST's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) at 0.6-5.0 {\mu}m and Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) at {\lambda}>5.0 {\mu}m. In this work we analyse the impact of choosing different combinations of NIRCam and MIRI broad-band filters (F070W to F770W), as well as having ancillary data at {\lambda}<0.6 {\mu}m, on the derived photometric redshifts (zphot) of a total of 5921 real and simulated galaxies, with known input redshifts z=0-10. We found that observations at {\lambda}<0.6 {\mu}m are necessary to control the contamination of high-z samples by low-z interlopers. Adding MIRI (F560W and F770W) photometry to the NIRCam data mitigates the absence of ancillary observations at {\lambda}<0.6 {\mu}m and improves the redshift estimation. At z=7-10, accurate zphot can be obtained with the NIRCam broad bands alone when S/N>=10, but the zphot quality significantly degrades at S/N<=5. Adding MIRI photometry with one magnitude brighter depth than the NIRCam depth allows for a redshift recovery of 83-99%, depending on SED type, and its effect is particularly noteworthy for galaxies with nebular emission. The vast majority of NIRCam galaxies with [F150W]=29 AB mag at z=7-10 will be detected with MIRI at [F560W, F770W]<28 mag if these sources are at least mildly evolved or have spectra with emission lines boosting the mid-infrared fluxes.
  • We present spatially-resolved Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 870 $\mu$m dust continuum maps of six massive, compact, dusty star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at $z\sim2.5$. These galaxies are selected for their small rest-frame optical sizes ($r_{\rm e, F160W}\sim1.6$ kpc) and high stellar-mass densities that suggest that they are direct progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at $z\sim2$. The deep observations yield high far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of L$_{\rm IR}=10^{12.3-12.8}$ L$_{\odot}$ and star formation rates (SFRs) of SFR$=200-700$ M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$, consistent with those of typical star-forming "main sequence" galaxies. The high-spatial resolution (FWHM$\sim$0.12"-0.18") ALMA and HST photometry are combined to construct deconvolved, mean radial profiles of their stellar mass and (UV+IR) SFR. We find that the dusty, nuclear IR-SFR overwhelmingly dominates the bolometric SFR up to $r\sim5$ kpc, by a factor of over 100$\times$ from the unobscured UV-SFR. Furthermore, the effective radius of the mean SFR profile ($r_{\rm e, SFR}\sim1$ kpc) is $\sim$30% smaller than that of the stellar mass profile. The implied structural evolution, if such nuclear starburst last for the estimated gas depletion time of $\Delta t=\pm100$ Myr, is a 4$\times$ increase of the stellar mass density within the central 1 kpc and a 1.6$\times$ decrease of the half-mass radius. This structural evolution fully supports dissipation-driven, formation scenarios in which strong nuclear starbursts transform larger, star-forming progenitors into compact quiescent galaxies.
  • We present a complete census of all Herschel-detected sources within the six massive lensing clusters of the HST Frontier Fields (HFF). We provide a robust legacy catalogue of 263 sources with Herschel fluxes, primarily based on imaging from the Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS) and PEP/HerMES Key Programmes. We optimally combine Herschel, Spitzer and WISE infrared (IR) photometry with data from HST, VLA and ground-based observatories, identifying counterparts to gain source redshifts. For each Herschel-detected source we also present magnification factor (mu), intrinsic IR luminosity and characteristic dust temperature, providing a comprehensive view of dust-obscured star formation within the HFF. We demonstrate the utility of our catalogues through an exploratory overview of the magnified population, including more than 20 background sub-LIRGs unreachable by Herschel without the assistance gravitational lensing.
  • We introduce a new color-selection technique to identify high-redshift, massive galaxies that are systematically missed by Lyman-break selection. The new selection is based on the H_{160} and IRAC 4.5um bands, specifically H - [4.5] > 2.25 mag. These galaxies, dubbed "HIEROs", include two major populations that can be separated with an additional J - H color. The populations are massive and dusty star-forming galaxies at z > 3 (JH-blue) and extremely dusty galaxies at z < 3 (JH-red). The 350 arcmin^2 of the GOODS-N and GOODS-S fields with the deepest HST/WFC3 and IRAC data contain 285 HIEROs down to [4.5] < 24 mag. We focus here primarily on JH-blue (z > 3) HIEROs, which have a median photometric redshift z ~4.4 and stellar massM_{*}~10^{10.6} Msun, and are much fainter in the rest-frame UV than similarly massive Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). Their star formation rates (SFRs) reaches ~240 Msun yr^{-1} leading to a specific SFR, sSFR ~4.2 Gyr^{-1}, suggesting that the sSFRs for massive galaxies continue to grow at z > 2 but at a lower growth rate than from z=0 to z=2. With a median half-light radius of 2 kpc, including ~20% as compact as quiescent galaxies at similar redshifts, JH-blue HIEROs represent perfect star-forming progenitors of the most massive (M_{*} > 10^{11.2} Msun) compact quiescent galaxies at z ~ 3 and have the right number density. HIEROs make up ~60% of all galaxies with M_{*} > 10^{10.5} Msun identified at z > 3 from their photometric redshifts. This is five times more than LBGs with nearly no overlap between the two populations. While HIEROs make up 15-25% of the total SFR density at z ~ 4-5, they completely dominate the SFR density taking place in M_{*} >10^{10.5} Msun galaxies, and are therefore crucial to understanding the very early phase of massive galaxy formation.
  • Several authors have reported that the dynamical masses of massive compact galaxies ($M_\star \gtrsim 10^{11} \ \mathrm{M_\odot}$, $r_\mathrm{e} \sim 1 \ \mathrm{kpc}$), computed as $M_\mathrm{dyn} = 5.0 \ \sigma_\mathrm{e}^2 r_\mathrm{e} / G$, are lower than their stellar masses $M_\star$. In a previous study from our group, the discrepancy is interpreted as a breakdown of the assumption of homology that underlie the $M_\mathrm{dyn}$ determinations. Here, we present new spectroscopy of six redshift $z \approx 1.0$ massive compact ellipticals from the Extended Groth Strip, obtained with the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We obtain velocity dispersions in the range $161-340 \ \mathrm{km \ s^{-1}}$. As found by previous studies of massive compact galaxies, our velocity dispersions are lower than the virial expectation, and all of our galaxies show $M_\mathrm{dyn} < M_\star$ (assuming a Salpeter initial mass function). Adding data from the literature, we build a sample covering a range of stellar masses and compactness in a narrow redshift range $\mathit{z \approx 1.0}$. This allows us to exclude systematic effects on the data and evolutionary effects on the galaxy population, which could have affected previous studies. We confirm that mass discrepancy scales with galaxy compactness. We use the stellar mass plane ($M_\star$, $\sigma_\mathrm{e}$, $r_\mathrm{e}$) populated by our sample to constrain a generic evolution mechanism. We find that the simulations of the growth of massive ellipticals due to mergers agree with our constraints and discard the assumption of homology.
  • We study the evolution of the core (r<1 kpc) and effective (r<r_e) stellar-mass surface densities, in star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Since z=3, both populations occupy distinct, linear relations in log(Sigma_e) and log(Sigma_1) vs. log(M). These structural relations exhibit slopes and scatter that remain almost constant with time while their normalizations decline. For SFGs, the normalization declines by less than a factor of 2 from z=3, in both Sigma_e and Sigma_1. Such mild declines suggest that SFGs build dense cores by growing along these relations. We define this evolution as the structural main sequence (Sigma-MS). Quiescent galaxies follow different relations (Sigma^Q_e, Sigma^Q_1) off the Sigma-MS by having higher densities than SFGs of the same mass and redshift. The normalization of Sigma^Q_e declines by a factor of 10 since z=3, but only a factor of 2 in Sigma^Q_1. Thus, the common denominator for quiescent galaxies at all redshifts is the presence of a dense stellar core, and the formation of such cores in SFGs is the main requirement for quenching. Expressed in 2D as deviations off the SFR-MS and off Sigma^Q_1 at each redshift, the distribution of massive galaxies forms a universal, L-shaped sequence that relates two fundamental physical processes: compaction and quenching. Compaction is a process of substantial core-growth in SFGs relative to that in the Sigma-MS. This process increases the core-to-total mass and Sersic index, thereby, making compact SFGs. Quenching occurs once compact SFGs reach a maximum central density above Sigma^Q_1 > 9.5 M_sun/kpc^2. This threshold provides the most effective selection criterion to identify the star-forming progenitors of quiescent galaxies at all redshifts.
  • J. A. Acosta-Pulido, I. Agudo, A. Alberdi, J. Alcolea, E. J. Alfaro, A. Alonso-Herrero, G. Anglada, P. Arnalte-Mur, Y. Ascasibar, B. Ascaso, R. Azulay, R. Bachiller, A. Baez-Rubio, E. Battaner, J. Blasco, C. B. Brook, V. Bujarrabal, G. Busquet, M. D. Caballero-Garcia, C. Carrasco-Gonzalez, J. Casares, A. J. Castro-Tirado, L. Colina, F. Colomer, I. de Gregorio-Monsalvo, A. del Olmo, J.-F. Desmurs, J. M. Diego, R. Dominguez-Tenreiro, R. Estalella, A. Fernandez-Soto, E. Florido, J. Font, J. A. Font, A. Fuente, R. Garcia-Benito, S. Garcia-Burillo, B. Garcia-Lorenzo, A. Gil de Paz, J. M. Girart, J. R. Goicoechea, J. F. Gomez, M. Gonzalez-Garcia, O. Gonzalez-Martin, J. I. Gonzalez-Serrano, J. Gorgas, J. Gorosabel, A. Guijarro, J. C. Guirado, L. Hernandez-Garcia, C. Hernandez-Monteagudo, D. Herranz, R. Herrero-Illana, Y.-D. Hu, N. Huelamo, M. Huertas-Company, J. Iglesias-Paramo, S. Jeong, I. Jimenez-Serra, J. H. Knapen, R. A. Lineros, U. Lisenfeld, J. M. Marcaide, I. Marquez, J. Marti, J. M. Marti, I. Marti-Vidal, E. Martinez-Gonzalez, J. Martin-Pintado, J. Masegosa, J. M. Mayen-Gijon, M. Mezcua, S. Migliari, P. Mimica, J. Moldon, O. Morata, I. Negueruela, S. R. Oates, M. Osorio, A. Palau, J. M. Paredes, J. Perea, P. G. Perez-Gonzalez, E. Perez-Montero, M. A. Perez-Torres, M. Perucho, S. Planelles, J. A. Pons, A. Prieto, V. Quilis, P. Ramirez-Moreta, C. Ramos Almeida, N. Rea, M. Ribo, M. J. Rioja, J. M. Rodriguez Espinosa, E. Ros, J. A. Rubiño-Martin, B. Ruiz-Granados, J. Sabater, S. Sanchez, C. Sanchez-Contreras, A. Sanchez-Monge, R. Sanchez-Ramirez, A. M. Sintes, J. M. Solanes, C. F. Sopuerta, M. Tafalla, J. C. Tello, B. Tercero, M. C. Toribio, J. M. Torrelles, M. A. P. Torres, A. Usero, L. Verdes-Montenegro, A. Vidal-Garcia, P. Vielva, J. Vilchez, B.-B. Zhang
    June 17, 2015 astro-ph.IM
    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is called to revolutionise essentially all areas of Astrophysics. With a collecting area of about a square kilometre, the SKA will be a transformational instrument, and its scientific potential will go beyond the interests of astronomers. Its technological challenges and huge cost requires a multinational effort, and Europe has recognised this by putting the SKA on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). The Spanish SKA White Book is the result of the coordinated effort of 120 astronomers from 40 different research centers. The book shows the enormous scientific interest of the Spanish astronomical community in the SKA and warrants an optimum scientific exploitation of the SKA by Spanish researchers, if Spain enters the SKA project.
  • We present Keck-I MOSFIRE spectroscopy in the Y and H bands of GDN-8231, a massive, compact, star-forming galaxy (SFG) at a redshift $z\sim1.7$. Its spectrum reveals both H$_{\alpha}$ and [NII] emission lines and strong Balmer absorption lines. The H$_{\alpha}$ and Spitzer MIPS 24 $\mu$m fluxes are both weak, thus indicating a low star formation rate of SFR $\lesssim5-10$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$. This, added to a relatively young age of $\sim700$ Myr measured from the absorption lines, provides the first direct evidence for a distant galaxy being caught in the act of rapidly shutting down its star formation. Such quenching allows GDN-8231 to become a compact, quiescent galaxy, similar to 3 other galaxies in our sample, by $z\sim1.5$. Moreover, the color profile of GDN-8231 shows a bluer center, consistent with the predictions of recent simulations for an early phase of inside-out quenching. Its line-of-sight velocity dispersion for the gas, $\sigma^{\rm{gas}}_{\!_{\rm LOS}}=127\pm32$ km s$^{-1}$, is nearly 40% smaller than that of its stars, $\sigma^{\star}_{\!_{\rm LOS}}=215\pm35$ km s$^{-1}$. High-resolution hydro-simulations of galaxies explain such apparently colder gas kinematics of up to a factor of $\sim1.5$ with rotating disks being viewed at different inclinations and/or centrally concentrated star-forming regions. A clear prediction is that their compact, quiescent descendants preserve some remnant rotation from their star-forming progenitors.
  • We explore the stellar initial mass function (IMF) of a sample of 49 massive quiescent galaxies (MQGs) at 0.9$<$z$<$1.5. We base our analysis on intermediate resolution spectro-photometric data in the GOODS-N field taken in the near-infrared and optical with the HST/WFC3 G141 grism and the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS). To constrain the slope of the IMF, we have measured the TiO$_2$ spectral feature, whose strength depends strongly on the content of low-mass stars, as well as on stellar age. Using ultraviolet to near-infrared individual and stacked spectral energy distributions, we have independently estimated the stellar ages of our galaxies. Knowing the age of the stellar population, we interpret the strong differences in the TiO$_2$ feature as an IMF variation. In particular, for the heaviest z$\sim$1 MQGs (M$>$10$^{11}$Msun) we find an average age of 1.7$\pm$0.3 Gyr and a bottom-heavy IMF ($\Gamma_b$=3.2$\pm$0.2). Lighter MQGs (2$\times$10$^{10}$$<$M$<$10$^{11}$ Msun) at the same redshift are younger on average (1.0$\pm$0.2 Gyr) and present a shallower IMF slope ($\Gamma_b=2.7^{+0.3}_{-0.4}$). Our results are in good agreement with the findings about the IMF slope in early-type galaxies of similar mass in the present-day Universe. This suggests that the IMF, a key characteristic of the stellar populations in galaxies, is bottom-heavier for more massive galaxies and has remained unchanged in the last $\sim$8 Gyr.
  • We combine multiwavelength data in the AEGIS-XD and C-COSMOS surveys to measure the typical dark matter halo mass of X-ray selected AGN [Lx(2-10keV)>1e42 erg/s] in comparison with far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies detected in the Herschel/PEP survey (PACS Evolutionary Probe; Lir>1e11 solar) and quiescent systems at z~1. We develop a novel method to measure the clustering of extragalactic populations that uses photometric redshift Probability Distribution Functions in addition to any spectroscopy. This is advantageous in that all sources in the sample are used in the clustering analysis, not just the subset with secure spectroscopy. The method works best for large samples. The loss of accuracy because of the lack of spectroscopy is balanced by increasing the number of sources used to measure the clustering. We find that X-ray AGN, far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies and passive systems in the redshift interval 0.6<z<1.4 are found in halos of similar mass, $\log M_{DMH}/(M_{\odot}\,h^{-1})\approx13.0$. We argue that this is because the galaxies in all three samples (AGN, star-forming, passive) have similar stellar mass distributions, approximated by the J-band luminosity. Therefore all galaxies that can potentially host X-ray AGN, because they have stellar masses in the appropriate range, live in dark matter haloes of $\log M_{DMH}/(M_{\odot}\,h^{-1})\approx13.0$ independent of their star-formation rates. This suggests that the stellar mass of X-ray AGN hosts is driving the observed clustering properties of this population. We also speculate that trends between AGN properties (e.g. luminosity, level of obscuration) and large scale environment may be related to differences in the stellar mass of the host galaxies.
  • We are undertaking a search for high-redshift low luminosity Lyman Alpha sources in the SHARDS survey. Among the pre-selected Lyman Alpha sources 2 candidates were spotted, located 3.19 arcsec apart, and tentatively at the same redshift. Here we report on the spectroscopic confirmation with GTC of the Lyman Alpha emission from this pair of galaxies at a confirmed spectroscopic redshifts of z=5.07. Furthermore, one of the sources is interacting/merging with another close companion that looks distorted. Based on the analysis of the spectroscopy and additional photometric data, we infer that most of the stellar mass of these objects was assembled in a burst of star formation 100 Myr ago. A more recent burst (2 Myr old) is necessary to account for the measured Lyman Alpha flux. We claim that these two galaxies are good examples of Lyman Alpha sources undergoing episodic star formation. Besides, these sources very likely constitute a group of interacting Lyman Alpha emitters (LAEs).
  • We present Keck-I MOSFIRE near-infrared spectroscopy for a sample of 13 compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at redshift $2\leq z \leq2.5$ with star formation rates of SFR$\sim$100M$_{\odot}$ y$^{-1}$ and masses of log(M/M$_{\odot}$)$\sim10.8$. Their high integrated gas velocity dispersions of $\sigma_{\rm{int}}$=230$^{+40}_{-30}$ km s$^{-1}$, as measured from emission lines of H$_{\alpha}$ and [OIII], and the resultant M$_{\star}-\sigma_{\rm{int}}$ relation and M$_{\star}$$-$M$_{\rm{dyn}}$ all match well to those of compact quiescent galaxies at $z\sim2$, as measured from stellar absorption lines. Since log(M$_{\star}$/M$_{\rm{dyn}}$)$=-0.06\pm0.2$ dex, these compact SFGs appear to be dynamically relaxed and more evolved, i.e., more depleted in gas and dark matter ($<$13$^{+17}_{-13}$\%) than their non-compact SFG counterparts at the same epoch. Without infusion of external gas, depletion timescales are short, less than $\sim$300 Myr. This discovery adds another link to our new dynamical chain of evidence that compact SFGs at $z\gtrsim2$ are already losing gas to become the immediate progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies by $z\sim2$.
  • Chandra data in the COSMOS, AEGIS-XD and 4Ms CDFS are combined with optical/near-IR photometry to determine the rest-frame U-V vs V-J colours of X-ray AGN hosts at mean redshifts 0.40 and 0.85. This combination of colours (UVJ) provides an efficient means of separating quiescent from star-forming, including dust reddened, galaxies. Morphological information emphasises differences between AGN split by their UVJ colours. AGN in quiescent galaxies are dominated by spheroids, while star-forming hosts are split between bulges and disks. The UVJ diagram of AGN hosts is then used to set limits on the accretion density associated with evolved and star-forming systems. Most of the black hole growth since z~1 is associated with star-forming hosts. Nevertheless, ~15-20% of the X-ray luminosity density since z~1, is taking place in the quiescent region of the UVJ diagram. For the z~0.40 subsample, there is tentative evidence (2sigma significance), that AGN split by their UVJ colours differ in Eddington ratio. AGN in star-forming hosts dominate at high Eddington ratios, while AGN in quiescent hosts become increasingly important as a fraction of the total population toward low Eddington ratios. At higher redshift, z~0.8, such differences are significant at the 2sigma level only at Eddington ratios >1e-3. These findings are consistent with scenarios in which diverse accretion modes are responsible for the build-up of SMBHs at the centres of galaxies. We compare our results with the GALFORM semi-analytic model, which postulates two black hole fuelling modes, the first linked to star-formation and the second occuring in passive galaxies. GALFORM predicts a larger fraction of black hole growth in quiescent galaxies at z<1, compared to the data. Relaxing the strong assumption of the model that passive AGN hosts have zero star-formation rate could reconcile this disagreement.
  • We analyze the star-forming and structural properties of 45 massive (log(M/Msun)>10) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2<z<3 to explore whether they are progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z~2. The optical/NIR and far-IR Spitzer/Herschel colors indicate that most compact SFGs are heavily obscured. Nearly half (47%) host an X-ray bright AGN. In contrast, only about 10% of other massive galaxies at that time host AGNs. Compact SFGs have centrally-concentrated light profiles and spheroidal morphologies similar to quiescent galaxies, and are thus strikingly different from other SFGs. Most compact SFGs lie either within the SFR-M main sequence (65%) or below (30%), on the expected evolutionary path towards quiescent galaxies. These results show conclusively that galaxies become more compact before they lose their gas and dust, quenching star formation. Using extensive HST photometry from CANDELS and grism spectroscopy from the 3D-HST survey, we model their stellar populations with either exponentially declining (tau) star formation histories (SFHs) or physically-motivated SFHs drawn from semi-analytic models (SAMs). SAMs predict longer formation timescales and older ages ~2 Gyr, which are nearly twice as old as the estimates of the tau models. While both models yield good SED fits, SAM SFHs better match the observed slope and zero point of the SFR-M main sequence. Some low-mass compact SFGs (log(M/Msun)=10-10.6) have younger ages but lower sSFRs than that of more massive galaxies, suggesting that the low-mass galaxies reach the red sequence faster. If the progenitors of compact SFGs are extended SFGs, state-of-the-art SAMs show that mergers and disk instabilities are both able to shrink galaxies, but disk instabilities are more frequent (60% versus 40%) and form more concentrated galaxies. We confirm this result via high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations.
  • In the course of our 870um APEX/LABOCA follow up of the Herschel Lensing Survey we have detected a source in AS1063 (RXC J2248.7-4431), that has no counterparts in any of the Herschel PACS/SPIRE bands, it is a Herschel 'drop-out' with S_870/S_500>0.5. The 870um emission is extended and centered on the brightest cluster galaxy suggesting either a multiply imaged background source or substructure in the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) increment due to inhomogeneities in the hot cluster gas of this merging cluster. We discuss both interpretations with emphasis on the putative lensed source. Based on the observed properties and on our lens model we find that this source could be the first SMG with a moderate far infrared luminosity (L_FIR<10^12 L_sol) detected so far at z>4. In deep HST observations we identified a multiply imaged z~6 source and we measured its spectroscopic redshift z=6.107 with VLT/FORS. This source could be associated with the putative SMG but it is most likely offset spatially by 10-30kpc and they could be interacting galaxies. With a FIR luminosity in the range [5-15]x10^{11} L_sol corresponding to a star formation rate in the range [80-260]M_sol/yr, this SMG would be more representative than the extreme starbursts usually detected at z>4. With a total magnification of ~25 it would open a unique window to the 'normal' dusty galaxies at the end of the epoch of reionization.
  • Nearby star-forming regions are ideal laboratories to study high-energy emission of different stellar populations, from very massive stars to brown dwarfs. NGC 2023 is a reflection nebula situated on the south of the Flame Nebula (NGC 2024) and at the edge of the H ii region IC 434, which also contains the Horsehead Nebula (Barnard 33). NGC 2023, NGC 2024, Barnard 33 and the surroundings of the O-type supergiant star {\zeta} Ori constitute the south part of the Orion B molecular complex. In this work, we present a comprehensive study of X-ray emitters in the region of NGC 2023 and its ?surroundings. We combine optical and infrared data to determine physical properties (mass, temperature, luminosity, presence of accretion disks) of the stars detected in an XMM-Newton observation. This study has allowed us to analyze spectral energy distribution of these stars for the first time and determine their evolutionary stage. Properties of the X-ray emitting plasma of these stars are compared to those found in other nearby star-forming regions. The results indicate that the stars that are being formed in this region have characteristics, in terms of physical properties and luminosity function, similar to those found in the Taurus-Auriga molecular complex.
  • Using far-infrared imaging from the "Herschel Lensing Survey", we derive dust properties of spectroscopically-confirmed cluster member galaxies within two massive systems at z~0.3: the merging Bullet Cluster and the more relaxed MS2137.3-2353. Most star-forming cluster sources (~90%) have characteristic dust temperatures similar to local field galaxies of comparable infrared (IR) luminosity (T_dust ~ 30K). Several sub-LIRG (L_IR < 10^11 L_sun) Bullet Cluster members are much warmer (T_dust > 37K) with far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) shapes resembling LIRG-type local templates. X-ray and mid-infrared data suggest that obscured active galactic nuclei do not contribute significantly to the infrared flux of these "warm dust" galaxies. Sources of comparable IR-luminosity and dust temperature are not observed in the relaxed cluster MS2137, although the significance is too low to speculate on an origin involving recent cluster merging. "Warm dust" galaxies are, however, statistically rarer in field samples (> 3sigma), indicating that the responsible mechanism may relate to the dense environment. The spatial distribution of these sources is similar to the whole far-infrared bright population, i.e. preferentially located in the cluster periphery, although the galaxy hosts tend towards lower stellar masses (M_* < 10^10 M_sun). We propose dust stripping and heating processes which could be responsible for the unusually warm characteristic dust temperatures. A normal star-forming galaxy would need 30-50% of its dust removed (preferentially stripped from the outer reaches, where dust is typically cooler) to recover a SED similar to a "warm dust" galaxy. These progenitors would not require a higher IR-luminosity or dust mass than the currently observed normal star-forming population.
  • We report in this work on a project aimed at determining Ly{\alpha} luminosity functions from z=3 to z=6. The project is based on the use of very deep photometry from the SHARDS Survey, in a set of 24 medium band filters in the GOODS-N field. We present here some preliminary work carried out with four test images in four consecutive bands. We use the narrow band selection technique for searching emission line candidates. Eleven candidates have been detected so far, many of which are strong Ly{\alpha} candidates. In particular, we have seen a firm candidate to an interacting pair of Ly{\alpha} sources at z=5.4.
  • We present the results of a comparison between the optical morphologies of a complete sample of 46 southern 2Jy radio galaxies at intermediate redshifts (0.05<z<0.7) and those of two control samples of quiescent early-type galaxies: 55 ellipticals at redshifts z<0.01 from the Observations of Bright Ellipticals at Yale (OBEY) survey, and 107 early-type galaxies at redshifts 0.2<z<0.7 in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). Based on these comparisons, we discuss the role of galaxy interactions in the triggering of powerful radio galaxies (PRGs). We find that a significant fraction of quiescent ellipticals at low and intermediate redshifts show evidence for disturbed morphologies at relatively high surface brightness levels, which are likely the result of past or on-going galaxy interactions. However, the morphological features detected in the galaxy hosts of the PRGs (e.g. tidal tails, shells, bridges, etc.) are up to 2 magnitudes brighter than those present in their quiescent counterparts. Indeed, if we consider the same surface brightness limits, the fraction of disturbed morphologies is considerably smaller in the quiescent population (53% at z<0.2 and 48% at 0.2<z<0.7) than in the PRGs (93% at z<0.2 and 95% at 0.2<z<0.7 considering strong-line radio galaxies only). This supports a scenario in which PRGs represent a fleeting active phase of a subset of the elliptical galaxies that have recently undergone mergers/interactions. However, we demonstrate that only a small proportion (<20%) of disturbed early-type galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources.
  • The spectral energy distributions (SED) of dusty galaxies at intermediate redshift may look similar to very high redshift galaxies in the optical/near infrared (NIR) domain. This can lead to the contamination of high redshift galaxy searches based on broad band optical/NIR photometry by lower redshift dusty galaxies as both kind of galaxies cannot be distinguished. The contamination rate could be as high as 50%. {This work shows how the far infrared (FIR) domain can help to recognize likely low-z interlopers in an optical/NIR search for high-z galaxies.} We analyse the FIR SEDs of two galaxies proposed as very high redshift ($z>7$) dropout candidates based on deep Hawk-I/VLT observations. The FIR SEDs are sampled with PACS/Herschel at 100 and 160\,$\mu$m, with SPIRE/Herschel at 250, 350 and 500\,$\mu$m and with LABOCA/APEX at 870\,$\mu$m. We find that redshifts $>7$ would imply extreme FIR SEDs (with dust temperatures $>100$\,K and FIR luminosities $>10^{13}$\,$L_{\odot}$). At z$\sim$2, instead, the SEDs of both sources would be compatible with that of typical ULIRGs/SMGs. Considering all the data available for these sources from visible to FIR we re-estimate the redshifts and we find $z\sim$1.6--2.5. Due to the strong spectral breaks observed in these galaxies, standard templates from the literature fail to reproduce the visible-near IR part of the SEDs even when additional extinction is included. These sources resemble strongly dust obscured galaxies selected in Spitzer observations with extreme visible-to-FIR colors, and the galaxy GN10 at $z=4$. Galaxies with similar SEDs could contaminate other high redshift surveys.
  • We present the AGN, star-forming, and morphological properties of a sample of 13 MIR-luminous (f(24) > 700uJy) IR-bright/optically-faint galaxies (IRBGs, f(24)/f(R) > 1000). While these z~2 sources were drawn from deep Chandra fields with >200 ks X-ray coverage, only 7 are formally detected in the X-ray and four lack X-ray emission at even the 2 sigma level. Spitzer IRS spectra, however, confirm that all of the sources are AGN-dominated in the mid-IR, although half have detectable PAH emission responsible for ~25% of their mid-infrared flux density. When combined with other samples, this indicates that at least 30-40% of luminous IRBGs have star-formation rates in the ULIRG range (~100-2000 Msun/yr). X-ray hardness ratios and MIR to X-ray luminosity ratios indicate that all members of the sample contain heavily X-ray obscured AGN, 80% of which are candidates to be Compton-thick. Furthermore, the mean X-ray luminosity of the sample, log L(2-10 keV)(ergs/s)=44.6, indicates that these IRBGs are Type 2 QSOs, at least from the X-ray perspective. While those sources most heavily obscured in the X-ray are also those most likely to display strong silicate absorption in the mid-IR, silicate absorption does not always accompany X-ray obscuration. Finally, ~70% of the IRBGs are merger candidates, a rate consistent with that of sub-mm galaxies (SMGs), although SMGs appear to be physically larger than IRBGs. These characteristics are consistent with the proposal that these objects represent a later, AGN-dominated, and more relaxed evolutionary stage following soon after the star-formation-dominated one represented by the SMGs.