• Debate over the planet occurrence rates around intermediate-mass stars has hinged on the accurate determination of masses of evolved stars, and has been exacerbated by a paucity of reliable, directly-measured fundamental properties for these stars. We present long-baseline optical interferometry of five evolved intermediate-mass ($\sim\,1.5\,\mathrm{M}_\odot$) planet-hosting stars using the PAVO beam combiner at the CHARA Array, which we combine with bolometric flux measurements and parallaxes to determine their radii and effective temperatures. We measured the radii and effective temperatures of 6 Lyncis ($5.12\pm0.16\,\mathrm{R}_\odot$, $4949\pm58\,\mathrm{K}$), 24 Sextantis ($5.49\pm0.18\,\mathrm{R}_\odot$, $4908\pm65\,\mathrm{K}$), $\kappa$ Coronae Borealis ($4.77\pm0.07\,\mathrm{R}_\odot$, $4870\pm47\,\mathrm{K}$), HR 6817 ($4.45\pm0.08\,\mathrm{R}_\odot$, $5013\pm59\,\mathrm{K}$), and HR 8641 ($4.91\pm0.12\,\mathrm{R}_\odot$, $4950\pm68\,\mathrm{K}$). We find disagreements of typically 15 per cent in angular diameter and $\sim$200 K in temperature compared to interferometric measurements in the literature, yet good agreement with spectroscopic and photometric temperatures, concluding that the previous interferometric measurements may have been affected by systematic errors exceeding their formal uncertainties. Modelling based on BaSTI isochrones using various sets of asteroseismic, spectroscopic, and interferometric constraints tends to favour slightly ($\sim$15 per cent) lower masses than generally reported in the literature.
  • The most powerful tests of stellar models come from the brightest stars in the sky, for which complementary techniques, such as astrometry, asteroseismology, spectroscopy, and interferometry can be combined. The K2 Mission is providing a unique opportunity to obtain high-precision photometric time series for bright stars along the ecliptic. However, bright targets require a large number of pixels to capture the entirety of the stellar flux, and bandwidth restrictions limit the number and brightness of stars that can be observed. To overcome this, we have developed a new photometric technique, that we call halo photometry, to observe very bright stars using a limited number of pixels. Halo photometry is simple, fast and does not require extensive pixel allocation, and will allow us to use K2 and other photometric missions, such as TESS, to observe very bright stars for asteroseismology and to search for transiting exoplanets. We apply this method to the seven brightest stars in the Pleiades open cluster. Each star exhibits variability; six of the stars show what are most-likely slowly pulsating B-star (SPB) pulsations, with amplitudes ranging from 20 to 2000 ppm. For the star Maia, we demonstrate the utility of combining K2 photometry with spectroscopy and interferometry to show that it is not a 'Maia variable', and to establish that its variability is caused by rotational modulation of a large chemical spot on a 10 d time scale.
  • High angular resolution images of IRC+10216 are presented in several near infrared wavelengths spanning more than 8 years. These maps have been reconstructed from interferometric observations obtained at both Keck and the VLT, and also from stellar occultations by the rings of Saturn observed with the Cassini spacecraft. The dynamic inner regions of the circumstellar environment are monitored over eight epochs ranging between January 2000 and July 2008. The system is shown to experience substantial evolution within this period including the fading of many previously reported persistent features, some of which had been identified as the stellar photosphere. These changes are discussed in context of existing models for the nature of the underlying star and the circumstellar environment. With access to these new images, we are able to report that none of the previously identified bright spots in fact contain the star, which is buried in its own dust and not directly visible in the near infrared.
  • The conventional approach to high-precision narrow-angle astrometry using a long baseline interferometer is to directly measure the fringe packet separation of a target and a nearby reference star. This is done by means of a technique known as phase-referencing which requires a network of dual beam combiners and laser metrology systems. Using an alternative approach that does not rely on phase-referencing, the narrow-angle astrometry of several closed binary stars (with separation less than 2$"$), as described in this paper, was carried out by observing the fringe packet crossing event of the binary systems. Such an event occurs twice every sidereal day when the line joining the two stars of the binary is is perpendicular to the projected baseline of the interferometer. Observation of these events is well suited for an interferometer in Antarctica. Proof of concept observations were carried out at the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI) with targets selected according to its geographical location. Narrow-angle astrometry using this indirect approach has achieved sub-100 micro-arcsecond precision.
  • The Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI) now incorporates a new beam combiner, called the Microarcsecond University of Sydney Companion Astrometry instrument (MUSCA), for the purpose of high precision differential astrometry of bright binary stars. Operating in the visible wavelength regime where photon-counting and post-processing fringe tracking is possible, MUSCA will be used in tandem with SUSI's primary beam combiner, Precision Astronomical Visible Observations (PAVO), to record high spatial resolution fringes and thereby measure the separation of fringe packets of binary stars. In its current phase of development, the dual beam combiner configuration has successfully demonstrated for the first time a dual-star phase-referencing operation in visible wavelengths. This paper describes the beam combiner optics and hardware, the network of metrology systems employed to measure every non-common path between the two beam combiners and also reports on a recent narrow-angle astrometric observation of $\delta$ Orionis A (HR 1852) as the project enters its on-sky testing phase.
  • (Abridged) Dust is expected to be ubiquitous in extrasolar planetary systems owing to the dynamical activity of minor bodies. Inner dust populations are, however, still poorly known because of the high contrast and small angular separation with respect to their host star. We aim to determine the level of near-infrared exozodiacal dust emission around a sample of 42 nearby main sequence stars with spectral types ranging from A to K and to investigate its correlation with various stellar parameters and with the presence of cold dust belts. We use high-precision K-band visibilities obtained with the FLUOR interferometer on the shortest baseline of the CHARA array. The calibrated visibilities are compared with the expected visibility of the stellar photosphere to assess whether there is an additional, fully resolved circumstellar emission. Near-infrared circumstellar emission amounting to about 1% of the stellar flux is detected around 13 of our 42 target stars. Follow-up observations showed that one of them (eps Cep) is associated with a stellar companion, while another one was detected around what turned out to be a giant star (kap CrB). The remaining 11 excesses found around single main sequence stars are most probably associated with hot circumstellar dust, yielding an overall occurrence rate of 28+8-6% for our (biased) sample. We show that the occurrence rate of bright exozodiacal discs correlates with spectral type, K-band excesses being more frequent around A-type stars. It also correlates with the presence of detectable far-infrared excess emission in the case of solar-type stars. This study provides new insight into the phenomenon of bright exozodiacal discs, showing that hot dust populations are probably linked to outer dust reservoirs in the case of solar-type stars. For A-type stars, no clear conclusion can be made regarding the origin of the detected near-infrared excesses.
  • We present interferometric observations of 7 main-sequence and 3 giant stars with spectral types from B2 to F6 using the PAVO beam combiner at the CHARA array. We have directly determined the angular diameters for these objects with an average precision of 2.3%. We have also computed bolometric fluxes using available photometry in the visible and infrared wavelengths, as well as space-based ultraviolet spectroscopy. Combined with precise \textit{Hipparcos} parallaxes, we have derived a set of fundamental stellar properties including linear radius, luminosity and effective temperature. Fitting the latter to computed isochrone models, we have inferred masses and ages of the stars. The effective temperatures obtained are in good agreement (at a 3% level) with nearly-independent temperature estimations from spectroscopy. They validate recent sixth-order polynomial (B-V)-$T_\mathrm{eff}$ empirical relations \citep{Boyajian2012a}, but suggest that a more conservative third-order solution \citep{vanBelle2009} could adequately describe the (V-K)-$T_\mathrm{eff}$ relation for main-sequence stars of spectral type A0 and later. Finally, we have compared mass values obtained combining surface gravity with inferred stellar radius (\textit{gravity mass}) and as a result of the comparison of computed luminosity and temperature values with stellar evolutionary models (\textit{isochrone mass}). The strong discrepancy between isochrone and gravity mass obtained for one of the observed stars, $\gamma$\,Lyr, suggests that determination of the stellar atmosphere parameters should be revised.
  • We present the results of long-baseline optical interferometry observations using the Precision Astronomical Visual Observations (PAVO) beam combiner at the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) Array to measure the angular sizes of three bright Kepler stars: {\theta} Cygni, and both components of the binary system 16 Cygni. Supporting infrared observations were made with the Michigan Infrared Combiner (MIRC) and Classic beam combiner, also at the CHARA Array. We find limb-darkened angular diameters of 0.753+/-0.009 mas for {\theta} Cyg, 0.539+/-0.007 mas for 16 Cyg A and 0.490+/-0.006 mas for 16 Cyg B. The Kepler Mission has observed these stars with outstanding photometric precision, revealing the presence of solar-like oscillations. Due to the brightness of these stars the oscillations have exceptional signal-to-noise, allowing for detailed study through asteroseismology, and are well constrained by other observations. We have combined our interferometric diameters with Hipparcos parallaxes, spectrophotometric bolometric fluxes and the asteroseismic large frequency separation to measure linear radii ({\theta} Cyg: 1.48+/-0.02 Rsun, 16 Cyg A: 1.22+/-0.02 Rsun, 16 Cyg B: 1.12+/-0.02 Rsun), effective temperatures ({\theta} Cyg: 6749+/-44 K, 16 Cyg A: 5839+/-42 K, 16 Cyg B: 5809+/-39 K), and masses ({\theta} Cyg: 1.37+/-0.04 Msun, 16 Cyg A: 1.07+/-0.05 Msun, 16 Cyg B: 1.05+/-0.04 Msun) for each star with very little model dependence. The measurements presented here will provide strong constraints for future stellar modelling efforts.
  • In the two decades since the first extra-solar planet was discovered, the detection and characterization of extra-solar planets has become one of the key endeavors in all of modern science. Recently direct detection techniques such as interferometry or coronography have received growing attention because they reveal the population of exoplanets inaccessible to Doppler or transit techniques, and moreover they allow the faint signal from the planet itself to be investigated. Next-generation stellar interferometers are increasingly incorporating photonic technologies due to the increase in fidelity of the data generated. Here, we report the design, construction and commissioning of a new high contrast imager; the integrated pupil-remapping interferometer; an instrument we expect will find application in the detection of young faint companions in the nearest star-forming regions. The laboratory characterisation of the instrument demonstrated high visibility fringes on all interferometer baselines in addition to stable closure phase signals. We also report the first successful on-sky experiments with the prototype instrument at the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope. Performance metrics recovered were consistent with ideal device behaviour after accounting for expected levels of decoherence and signal loss from the uncompensated seeing. The prospect of complete Fourier-coverage coupled with the current performance metrics means that this photonically-enhanced instrument is well positioned to contribute to the science of high contrast companions.
  • Hierarchical triple systems comprise a close binary and a more distant component. They are important for testing theories of star formation and of stellar evolution in the presence of nearby companions. We obtained 218 days of Kepler photometry of HD 181068 (magnitude of 7.1), supplemented by groundbased spectroscopy and interferometry, which show it to be a hierarchical triple with two types of mutual eclipses. The primary is a red giant that is in a 45-day orbit with a pair of red dwarfs in a close 0.9-day orbit. The red giant shows evidence for tidally-induced oscillations that are driven by the orbital motion of the close pair. HD 181068 is an ideal target for studies of dynamical evolution and testing tidal friction theories in hierarchical triple systems.
  • The prospects for using asteroseismology of rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) stars are hampered by the large uncertainty in fundamental stellar parameters. Results in the literature for the effective temperature (Teff) often span a range of 1000 K. Our goal is to reduce systematic errors and improve the Teff calibration of Ap stars based on new interferometric measurements. We obtained long-baseline interferometric observations of beta CrB using the CHARA/FLUOR instrument. To disentangle the flux contributions of the two components of this binary star, we obtained VLT/NACO adaptive optics images. We determined limb darkened angular diameters of 0.699+-0.017 mas for beta CrB A (from interferometry) and 0.415+-0.017 mas for beta CrB B (from surface brightness- color relations), corresponding to radii of 2.63+-0.09 Rsun (3.4 percent uncertainty) and 1.56+-0.07 Rsun (4.5 percent). The combined bolometric flux of the A and B components was determined from satellite UV data, spectrophotometry in the visible and broadband data in the infrared. The flux from the B component constitutes 16+-4 percent of the total flux and was determined by fitting an ATLAS9 model atmosphere to the broad-band NACO J and K magnitudes. Combining the flux of the A component with its measured angular diameter, we determine the effective temperature Teff(A) = 7980+-180 K (2.3 percent). Our new interferometric and imaging data enable a nearly model-independent determination of the effective temperature of beta CrB A. Including our recent study of alpha Cir, we now have direct Teff measurements of two of the brightest roAp stars, providing a strong benchmark for an improved calibration of the Teff scale for Ap stars. This will support the use of potentially strong constraints imposed by asteroseismic studies of roAp stars.
  • The University of Sydney has a long history in optical stellar interferometry. The first project, in the 1960s, was the Narrabri Stellar Intensity Interferometer, which measured the angular diameters of 32 hot stars and established the temperature scale for spectral classes O - F. That instrument was followed by the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI), which is now undergoing a third-generation upgrade, to use the multi-wavelength PAVO beam combiner. SUSI operates at visible rather than IR wavelengths and has baselines up to 160 m, so it is well suited to the study of hot stars. A number of studies have been carried out, and more are planned when commissioning of the PAVO system is complete. Conversion of the system to allow remote operation will allow larger scientific projects to be undertaken.
  • The binary star delta Sco (HD143275) underwent remarkable brightening in the visible in 2000, and continues to be irregularly variable. The system was observed with the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI) in 1999, 2000, 2001, 2006 and 2007. The 1999 observations were consistent with predictions based on the previously published orbital elements. The subsequent observations can only be explained by assuming that an optically bright emission region with an angular size of > 2 +/- 1 mas formed around the primary in 2000. By 2006/2007 the size of this region grew to an estimated > 4 mas. We have determined a consistent set of orbital elements by simultaneously fitting all the published interferometric and spectroscopic data as well as the SUSI data reported here. The resulting elements and the brightness ratio for the system measured prior to the outburst in 2000 have been used to estimate the masses of the components. We find Ma = 15 +/- 7 Msun and Mb = 8.0 +/- 3.6 Msun. The dynamical parallax is estimated to be 7.03 +/- 0.15 mas, which is in good agreement with the revised HIPPARCOS parallax.
  • We present results from a spectro-interferometric study of the Miras o Cet, R Leo and W Hya obtained with the Keck Aperture Masking Experiment from 1998 Sep to 2002 Jul. The spectrally dispersed visibility data permit fitting with circularly symmetric brightness profiles such as a simple uniform disk. The stellar angular diameter obtained over up to ~ 450 spectral channels spaning the region 1.1-3.8 microns is presented. Use of a simple uniform disk brightness model facilitates comparison between epochs and with existing data and theoretical models. Strong size variations with wavelength were recorded for all stars, probing zones of H2O, CO, OH, and dust formation. Comparison with contemporaneous spectra extracted from our data show a strong anti-correlation between the observed angular diameter and flux. These variations consolidate the notion of a complex stellar atmosphere consisting of molecular shells with time-dependent densities and temperatures. Our findings are compared with existing data and pulsation models. The models were found to reproduce the functional form of the wavelength vs. angular diameter curve well, although some departures are noted in the 2.8-3.5 micron range.
  • We have used the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI) to measure the angular diameter of alpha Cir. This is the first detailed interferometric study of a rapidly oscillating A (roAp) star, alpha Cir being the brightest member of its class. We used the new and more accurate Hipparcos parallax to determine the radius to be 1.967+-0.066 Rs. We have constrained the bolometric flux from calibrated spectra to determine an effective temperature of 7420+-170 K. This is the first direct determination of the temperature of an roAp star. Our temperature is at the low end of previous estimates, which span over 1000 K and were based on either photometric indices or spectroscopic methods. In addition, we have analysed two high-quality spectra of alpha Cir, obtained at different rotational phases and we find evidence for the presence of spots. In both spectra we find nearly solar abundances of C, O, Si, Ca and Fe, high abundance of Cr and Mn, while Co, Y, Nd and Eu are overabundant by about 1 dex. The results reported here provide important observational constraints for future studies of the atmospheric structure and pulsation of alpha Cir.
  • The angular diameters of six oxygen rich Mira-type long-period variables have been measured at various near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths using the aperture masking technique in an extensive observing program from 1997 Jan to 2004 Sep. These data sets span many pulsation cycles of the observed objects and represent the largest study of multi-wavelength, multi-epoch interferometric angular diameter measurements on Mira stars to date. The calibrated visibility data of o Cet, R Leo, R Cas, W Hya, chi Cyg and R Hya are fitted using a uniform disk brightness distribution model to facilitate comparison between epochs, wavelengths and with existing data and theoretical models. The variation of angular diameter as a function of wavelength and time are studied, and cyclic diameter variations are detected for all objects in our sample. These variations are believed to stem from time-dependent changes of density and temperature (and hence varying molecular opacities) in different layers of these stars. The similarities and differences in behaviour between these objects are analyzed and discussed in the context of existing theoretical models. Furthermore, we present time-dependent 3.08 micron angular diameter measurements, probing for the first time these zones of probable dust formation, which show unforeseen sizes and are consistently out of phase with other NIR layers shown in this study. The S-type Mira chi Cyg exhibits significantly different behaviour compared to the M-type Miras in this study.
  • The first orbital solution for the spectroscopic pair in the multiple star system sigma Scorpii, determined from measurements with the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI), is presented. The primary component is of beta Cephei variable type and has been one of the most intensively studied examples of its class. The orbital solution, when combined with radial velocity results found in the literature, yields a distance of 174(+23,-18) pc, which is consistent with, but more accurate than the Hipparcos value. For the primary component we determine 18.4+/-5.4 M_sun, -4.12+/-0.34 mag and 12.7+/-1.8 R_sun for the mass, absolute visual magnitude and radius respectively. A B1 dwarf spectral type and luminosity class for the secondary is proposed from the mass determination of 11.9+/-3.1 M_sun and the estimated system age of 10 Myr.
  • We have used the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI) to measure the angular diameter of beta Hydri. This star is a nearby G2 subgiant whose mean density was recently measured with high precision using asteroseismology. We determine the radius and effective temperature of the star to be 1.814+/-0.017 R_sun (0.9%) and 5872+/-44 K (0.7%) respectively. By combining this value with the mean density, as estimated from asteroseismology, we make a direct estimate of the stellar mass. We find a value of 1.07+/-0.03 M_sun (2.8%), which agrees with published estimates based on fitting in the H-R diagram, but has much higher precision. These results place valuable constraints on theoretical models of beta Hyi and its oscillation frequencies.
  • The triple system HD158926 (lambda Sco) has been observed interferometrically with the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer and the elements of the wide orbit have been determined. These are significantly more accurate than the previous elements found spectroscopically. The inclination of the wide orbit is consistent with the inclination previously found for the orbit of the close companion. The wide orbit also has low eccentricity, suggesting that the three stars were formed at the same time. The brightness ratio between the two B stars was also measured at lambda = 442nm and 700nm. The brightness ratio and colour index are consistent with the previous classification of lambda Sco A as B1.5 and lambda Sco B as B2. Evolutionary models show that the two stars lie on the main sequence. Since they have have the same age and luminosity class (IV) the mass-luminosity relation can be used to determine the mass ratio of the two stars: M_B/M_A = 0.76+/-0.04. The spectroscopic data have been reanalyzed using the interferometric values for P, T, e and omega, leading to revised values for a_1sin i and the mass function. The individual masses can be found from the mass ratio, the mass function, spectrum synthesis and the requirement that the age of both components must be the same: M_A = 10.4+/-1.3 Msun and M_B = 8.1+/-1.0 Msun. The masses, angular semimajor axis and the period of the system can be used to determine the dynamical parallax. We find the distance to lambda Sco to be 112+/-5 pc, which is approximately a factor of two closer than the HIPPARCOS value of 216+/-42 pc.
  • We present new K-band long baseline interferometer observations of three young stellar objects of the FU Orionis class, V1057 Cyg, V1515 Cyg and Z CMa-SE, obtained at the Keck Interferometer during its commissioning science period. The interferometer clearly resolves the source of near-infrared emission in all three objects. Using simple geometrical models we derive size scales (0.5-4.5 AU) for this emission. All three objects appear significantly more resolved than expected from simple models of accretion disks tuned to fit the broadband optical and infrared spectro-photometry. We explore variations in the key parameters that are able to lower the predicted visibility amplitudes to the measured levels, and conclude that accretion disks alone do not reproduce the spectral energy distributions and K-band visibilities simultaneously. We conclude that either disk models are inadequate to describe the near-infrared emission, or additional source components are needed. We hypothesize that large scale emission (10s of AU) in the interferometer field of view is responsible for the surprisingly low visibilities. This emission may arise in scattering by large envelopes believed to surround these objects.
  • High angular resolution images of IRC +10216 taken at various bandpasses within the near-infrared h, k & l bands are presented. The maps have the highest angular resolution yet recovered, and were reconstructed from interferometric measurements obtained at the Keck 1 telescope in 1997 December and 1998 April, forming a subset of a 7-epoch monitoring program presented earlier [paper 1]. Systematic changes with observing wavelength are found and discussed in context of present geometrical models for the circumstellar envelope. With these new high-resolution, multi-wavelength data and contemporaneous photometry, we also re-visit the hypothesis that the bright compact Core of the nebula (component `A') marks the location of the central carbon star. We find that directly measured properties of the Core (angular size, flux density, color temperature) are consistent with a reddened carbon star photosphere (line-of-sight tau=5.3).
  • Observations at mid-infrared (4.8-17.65 um) and radio (0.7-1.3 cm) wavelengths are used to constrain the structure of the high-mass star-forming region W3 IRS5 on 0.1'' (200 AU) scales. Two bright mid-infrared sources are detected, as well as diffuse emission. The bright sources have associated compact radio emission and probably are young high-mass stars. The measured sizes and estimated temperatures indicate that these sources together can supply the observed far-infrared luminosity. However, an optically thick radio source with a possible mid-infrared counterpart may also contribute significant luminosity; if so, it must be extremely deeply embedded. The infrared colour temperatures of 350-390 K and low radio brightness suggest gravitational confinement of the H II regions and ongoing accretion at a rate of a few 10^-8 M0/yr or more. Variations in the accretion rate would explain the observed radio variability. The low estimated foreground extinction suggests the existence of a cavity around the central stars, perhaps blown by stellar winds. At least three radio sources without mid-infrared counterparts appear to show proper motions of ~100 km/s, and may be deeply embedded young runaway OB stars, but more likely are clumps in the ambient material which are shock-ionized by the OB star winds.
  • We present Keck LWS images of the Orion BN/KL star forming region obtained in the first multi-wavelength study to have 0.3-0.5" resolution from 4.7 to 22 microns. The young stellar objects designated infrared source-n and radio source-I are believed to dominate the BN/KL region. We have detected extended emission from a probable accretion disk around source-n but infer a stellar luminosity on the order of only 2000 Lsun. Although source-I is believed to be more luminous, we do not detect an infrared counterpart even at the longest wavelengths. However, we resolve the closeby infrared source, IRc2, into an arc of knots ~1000 AU long at all wavelengths. Although the physical relation of source-I to IRc2 remains ambiguous, we suggest these sources mark a high density core (10^7-10^8 pc^-3 over 1000 AU) within the larger BN/KL star forming cluster. The high density may be a consequence of the core being young and heavily embedded. We suggest the energetics of the BN/KL region may be dominated by this cluster core rather than one or two individual sources.
  • The Herbig Ae/Be star LkHalpha 101 has been imaged at high angular resolution at a number of wavelengths in the near-infrared (from 1 to 3 microns) using the Keck 1 Telescope, and also observed in the mid-infrared (11.15 microns) using the U.C. Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer (ISI). The resolved circular disk with a central hole or cavity reported in Tuthill et al. (2001) is confirmed. This is consistent with an almost face-on view (inclination < 35 deg) onto a luminous pre- or early-main sequence object surrounded by a massive circumstellar disk. With a multiple-epoch study spanning almost four years, relative motion of the binary companion has been detected, together with evidence for changes in the brightness distribution of the central disk/star. The resolution of the LkHalpha 101 disk by ISI mid-infrared interferometry constitutes the first such measurement of a young stellar object in this wavelength region. The angular size was found to increase only slowly from 1.6 to 11.15 microns, inconsistent with standard power-law temperature profiles usually encountered in the literature, supporting instead models with a hot inner cavity and relatively rapid transition to a cool or tenuous outer disk. The radius of the dust-free inner cavity is consistent with a model of sublimation of dust in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field. Measurements from interferometry have been combined with published photometry enabling an investigation of the energetics and fundamental properties of this prototypical system.
  • The results of a 7-epoch interferometric imaging study, at wavelengths in the near-infrared K-band, of the carbon star IRC +10216 are presented. The use of non- and partially-redundant aperture masking techniques on the 10-m Keck-I telescope has allowed us to produce images of the innermost regions of the circumstellar dust envelope with unprecedented detail. With roughly twice the resolving power of previous work, the complex asymmetric structures reported within the central 0.5 arcsec (20 stellar radii) have been imaged at the size scale of the stellar disk itself (about 50 mas). A prominent dark lane at a position angle of approximately 120 deg is suggested to be an optically thick disk or torus of dust which could help to explain IRC +10216's well-known bipolarity at a position angle of 20 deg. Observations spanning more than a pulsational cycle (638 days) have revealed significant temporal evolution of the nebula, including the outward motion of bright knots and clumps. Registering these displacements against the compact bright core, which we tentatively identify as marking the location of the star, has allowed us to determine the apparent angular velocity at a number of points. The magnitudes of the proper motions were found to be in agreement with current estimates of the stellar distance and radial velocity. Higher outflow speeds were found for features with greater separation from the core. This is consistent with acceleration taking place over the region sampled by the measurements, however alternate interpretations are also presented. Although a number of changes of morphology were found, none were clearly interpreted as the condensation of new dust over the pulsation cycle.