• We present seeing-limited narrow-band mid-IR GTC/CanariCam images of the spatially extended fullerene-containing planetary nebula (PN) IC 418. The narrow-band images cover the C60 fullerene band at 17.4 {\mu}m, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon like (PAH-like) feature at 11.3 {\mu}m, the broad 9-13 {\mu}m feature, and their adjacent continua at 9.8 and 20.5 {\mu}m. We study the relative spatial distribution of these complex species, all detected in the Spitzer and Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) spectra of IC 418, with the aim of getting observational constraints to the formation process of fullerenes in H-rich circumstellar environments. A similar ring-like extended structure is seen in all narrow-band filters, except in the dust continuum emission at 9.8 {\mu}m, which peaks closer to the central star. The continuum-subtracted images display a clear ring-like extended structure for the carrier of the broad 9-13 {\mu}m emission, while the spatial distribution of the (PAH-like) 11.3 {\mu}m emission is not so well defined. Interestingly, a residual C60 17.4 {\mu}m emission (at about 4-{\sigma} from the sky background) is seen when subtracting the dust continuum emission at 20.5 {\mu}m. This residual C60 emission, if real, might have several interpretations; the most exciting being perhaps that other fullerene-based species like hydrogenated fullerenes with very low H-content may contribute to the observed 17.4 {\mu}m emission. We conclude that higher sensitivity mid-IR images and spatially resolved spectroscopic observations (especially in the Q-band) are necessary to get some clues about fullerene formation in PNe.
  • Hi-GAL is a large-scale survey of the Galactic plane, performed with Herschel in five infrared continuum bands between 70 and 500 $\mu$m. We present a band-merged catalogue of spatially matched sources and their properties derived from fits to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and heliocentric distances, based on the photometric catalogs presented in Molinari et al. (2016a), covering the portion of Galactic plane $-71.0^{\circ}< \ell < 67.0^{\circ}$. The band-merged catalogue contains 100922 sources with a regular SED, 24584 of which show a 70 $\mu$m counterpart and are thus considered proto-stellar, while the remainder are considered starless. Thanks to this huge number of sources, we are able to carry out a preliminary analysis of early stages of star formation, identifying the conditions that characterise different evolutionary phases on a statistically significant basis. We calculate surface densities to investigate the gravitational stability of clumps and their potential to form massive stars. We also explore evolutionary status metrics such as the dust temperature, luminosity and bolometric temperature, finding that these are higher in proto-stellar sources compared to pre-stellar ones. The surface density of sources follows an increasing trend as they evolve from pre-stellar to proto-stellar, but then it is found to decrease again in the majority of the most evolved clumps. Finally, we study the physical parameters of sources with respect to Galactic longitude and the association with spiral arms, finding only minor or no differences between the average evolutionary status of sources in the fourth and first Galactic quadrants, or between "on-arm" and "inter-arm" positions.
  • (Abridged) We present the first public release of high-quality data products (DR1) from Hi-GAL, the {\em Herschel} infrared Galactic Plane Survey. Hi-GAL is the keystone of a suite of continuum Galactic Plane surveys from the near-IR to the radio, and covers five wavebands at 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 micron, encompassing the peak of the spectral energy distribution of cold dust for 8 < T < 50K. This first Hi-GAL data release covers the inner Milky Way in the longitude range 68{\deg} > l > -70{\deg} in a |b|<1{\deg} latitude strip. Photometric maps have been produced with the ROMAGAL pipeline, that optimally capitalizes on the excellent sensitivity and stability of the bolometer arrays of the {\em Herschel} PACS and SPIRE photometric cameras, to deliver images of exquisite quality and dynamical range, absolutely calibrated with {\em Planck} and {\em IRAS}, and recovering extended emission at all wavelengths and all spatial scales. The compact source catalogues have been generated with the CuTEx algorithm, specifically developed to optimize source detection and extraction in the extreme conditions of intense and spatially varying background that are found in the Galactic Plane in the thermal infrared. Hi-GAL DR1 images will be accessible via a dedicated web-based image cutout service. The DR1 Compact Source Catalogues are delivered as single-band photometric lists containing, in addition to source position, peak and integrated flux and source sizes, a variety of parameters useful to assess the quality and reliability of the extracted sources, caveats and hints to help this assessment are provided. Flux completeness limits in all bands are determined from extensive synthetic source experiments and depend on the specific line of sight along the Galactic Plane. Hi-GAL DR1 catalogues contain 123210, 308509, 280685, 160972 and 85460 compact sources in the five bands, respectively.
  • CONTEXT: Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are in one of the latest evolutionary stages of low to intermediate-mass stars. Their vigorous mass loss has a significant effect on the stellar evolution, and is a significant source of heavy elements and dust grains for the interstellar medium. The mass-loss rate can be well traced by carbon monoxide (CO) line emission. AIMS: We present new Herschel HIFI and IRAM 30m telescope CO line data for a sample of 53 galactic AGB stars. The lines cover a fairly large range of excitation energy from the $J=1\to0$ line to the $J=9\to8$ line, and even the $J=14\to13$ line in a few cases. We perform radiative transfer modelling for 38 of these sources to estimate their mass-loss rates. METHODS: We used a radiative transfer code based on the Monte Carlo method to model the CO line emission. We assume spherically symmetric circumstellar envelopes that are formed by a constant mass-loss rate through a smoothly accelerating wind. RESULTS: We find models that are consistent across a broad range of CO lines for most of the stars in our sample, i.e., a large number of the circumstellar envelopes can be described with a constant mass-loss rate. We also find that an accelerating wind is required to fit, in particular, the higher-J lines and that a velocity law will have a significant effect on the model line intensities. The results cover a wide range of mass-loss rates ($\sim 10^{-8}$ to $2\times 10^{-5}~\mathrm{M}_\odot~\mathrm{ yr}^{-1}$) and gas expansion velocities (2 to $21.5$ km s$^{-1}$), and include M-, S-, and C-type AGB stars. Our results generally agree with those of earlier studies, although we tend to find slightly lower mass-loss rates by about 40%, on average. We also present "bonus" lines detected during our CO observations.
  • We report on the discovery of strong intensity variations in the high rotational lines of abundant molecular species towards the archetypical circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216. The observations have been carried out with the HIFI instrument on board \textit{Herschel}\thanks{\textit{Herschel} is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA} and with the IRAM\thanks{This work was based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30-meter telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain)} 30-m telescope. They cover several observing periods spreading over 3 years. The line intensity variations for molecules produced in the external layers of the envelope most probably result from time variations in the infrared pumping rates. We analyze the main implications this discovery has on the interpretation of molecular line emission in the envelopes of Mira-type stars. Radiative transfer calculations have to take into account both the time variability of infrared pumping and the possible variation of the dust and gas temperatures with stellar phase in order to reproduce the observation of molecular lines at different epochs. The effect of gas temperature variations with stellar phase could be particularly important for lines produced in the innermost regions of the envelope. Each layer of the circumstellar envelope sees the stellar light radiation with a different lag time (phase). Our results show that this effect must be included in the models. The sub-mm and FIR lines of AGB stars cannot anymore be considered as safe intensity calibrators.
  • We present 48 Herschel/PACS spectra of evolved stars in the wavelength range of 67-72 $\mu$m. This wavelength range covers the 69 $\mu$m band of crystalline olivine ($\text{Mg}_{2-2x}\text{Fe}_{(2x)}\text{SiO}_{4}$). The width and wavelength position of this band are sensitive to the temperature and composition of the crystalline olivine. Our sample covers a wide range of objects: from high mass-loss rate AGB stars (OH/IR stars, $\dot M \ge 10^{-5}$ M$_\odot$/yr), through post-AGB stars with and without circumbinary disks, to planetary nebulae and even a few massive evolved stars. The goal of this study is to exploit the spectral properties of the 69 $\mu$m band to determine the composition and temperature of the crystalline olivine. Since the objects cover a range of evolutionary phases, we study the physical and chemical properties in this range of physical environments. We fit the 69 $\mu$m band and use its width and position to probe the composition and temperature of the crystalline olivine. For 27 sources in the sample, we detected the 69 $\mu$m band of crystalline olivine ($\text{Mg}_{(2-2x)}\text{Fe}_{(2x)}\text{SiO}_{4}$). The 69 $\mu$m band shows that all the sources produce pure forsterite grains containing no iron in their lattice structure. The temperature of the crystalline olivine as indicated by the 69 $\mu$m band, shows that on average the temperature of the crystalline olivine is highest in the group of OH/IR stars and the post-AGB stars with confirmed Keplerian disks. The temperature is lower for the other post-AGB stars and lowest for the planetary nebulae. A couple of the detected 69 $\mu$m bands are broader than those of pure magnesium-rich crystalline olivine, which we show can be due to a temperature gradient in the circumstellar environment of these stars. continued...
  • We present a study of 16 PNe where fullerenes have been detected in their Spitzer spectra. This large sample of objects offers an unique opportunity to test conditions of fullerene formation and survival under different metallicity environments as we are analyzing five sources in our own Galaxy, four in the LMC, and seven in the SMC. Among the 16 PNe under study, we present the first detection of C60 (possibly also C70) fullerenes in the PN M 1-60 as well as of the unusual 6.6, 9.8, and 20 um features (possible planar C24) in the PN K 3-54. Although selection effects in the original samples of PNe observed with Spitzer may play a potentially significant role in the statistics, we find that the detection rate of fullerenes in C-rich PNe increases with decreasing metallicity (5% in the Galaxy, 20% in the LMC, and 44% in the SMC). CLOUDY photoionization modeling matches the observed IR fluxes with central stars that display a rather narrow range in effective temperature (30,000-45,000 K), suggesting a common evolutionary status of the objects and similar fullerene formation conditions. The observed C60 intensity ratios in the Galactic sources confirm our previous finding in the MCs that the fullerene emission is not excited by the UV radiation from the central star. CLOUDY models also show that line- and wind-blanketed model atmospheres can explain many of the observed [NeIII]/[NeII] ratios by photoionization suggesting that possibly the UV radiation from the central star, and not shocks, are triggering the decomposition of the circumstellar dust grains. With the data at hand, we suggest that the most likely explanation for the formation of fullerenes and graphene precursors in PNe is that these molecular species are built from the photo-chemical processing of a carbonaceous compound with a mixture of aromatic and aliphatic structures similar to that of HAC dust.
  • The investigation of post-AGB objects (proto-planetary nebulae) is very important from the standpoint of physical and chemical changes occurring during the late stages of stellar evolution. The Toru\'n catalogue of Galactic post-AGB and related objects is an evolutive catalogue containing astrometric, photometric and spectroscopic data as well as HST images for all known post-AGB objects and candidates in our Galaxy. This free-access catalogue can serve as an ideal tool to study different groups of post-AGB objects, especially due to the fact that all information is gathered in one place. The second release of our catalogue introduces a simple classification scheme of post-AGB objects and includes a significant number of new objects, photometric data, spectra and images. Here, using objects from the catalogue we consider the problem of the termination of the AGB phase.
  • We present the Spitzer/IRS spectra of 157 compact Galactic PNe. These young PNe provide insight on the effects of dust in early post-AGB evolution, before much of the dust is altered or destroyed by the hardening stellar radiation field. Most of the selected targets have PN-type IRS spectra, while a few turned out to be misclassified stars. We inspected the group properties of the PN spectra and classified them based on the different dust classes (featureless, carbon-rich dust; oxygen-rich dust; mixed-chemistry dust) and subclasses (aromatic and aliphatic; crystalline and amorphous). All PNe are characterized by dust continuum and more than 80% of the sample shows solid state features above the continuum, in contrast with the Magellanic Cloud sample where only ~40% of the entire sample displays solid state features; this is an indication of the strong link between dust properties and metallicity. The Galactic PNe that show solid state features are almost equally divided among the CRD, ORD, and MCD. We analyzed dust properties together with other PN properties and found that (i) there is an enhancement of MCD PNe toward the Galactic center; (ii) CRD PNe could be seen as defining an evolutionary sequence, contrary to the ORD and MCD PNe; (iii) C- and O-rich grains retain different equilibrium temperatures, as expected from models; (iv) ORD PNe are highly asymmetric and CRD PNe highly symmetric; point-symmetry is statistically more common in MCD. We find that the Galactic Disk sample does not include MCD PNe, and the other dust classes are differently populated from high to low metallicity environments. The MCPNe seem to attain higher dust temperatures at similar evolutionary stages, in agreement with the observational findings of smaller dust grains in low metallicity interstellar environments.
  • Aims: To investigate the first high resolution optical spectrum of the B-type star, LS III +52 24, identified as the optical counterpart of the hot post-AGB candidate IRAS 22023+5249 (I22023). Methods: We carried out detailed identifications of the observed absorption and emission features in the high resolution spectrum (4290 - 9015 A) of I22023 obtained with the Utrecht Echelle Spectrograph on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. Using Kurucz's WIDTH9 program and the spectrum synthesis code, SYNSPEC, we determined the atmospheric parameters and abundances. The photospheric abundances were derived under the LTE approximation. The NEBULAR package under IRAF was used to estimate the electron temperature (T_e) and the electron density (N_e) from the [N II] and [S II] lines. Results: We estimated T_eff=24000 K, log g=3.0, xi_t=7 kms^{-1}. The derived CNO abundances suggest an evolved star with C/O < 1. P-Cygni profiles of hydrogen and helium indicate ongoing post-AGB mass loss. The presence of [N II] and [S II] lines and the non-detection of [O III] indicate that photoionisation has just started. The derived nebular parameters T_e=7000 K, N_e=1.2X10^{4} cm^{-3} are comparable to those measured in young, compact planetary nebulae (PNe). The nebular expansion velocity was estimated to be 17.5 kms^{-1}. Conclusions: The observed spectral features, large heliocentric radial velocity (-148.31 +/- 0.60 kms^{-1}), atmospheric parameters and chemical composition indicate that I22023, at a distance of 1.95 kpc, is an evolved post-AGB star belonging to the old disk population. The nebular parameters suggest that the central star may be evolving into a compact, young PN, similar to Hen3-1357.
  • The first high-resolution (R~50,000) optical spectrum of the B-type star, LS III +52 24, identified as the optical counterpart of the hot post-AGB candidate IRAS 22023+5249 (I22023) is presented. We report the detailed identifications of the observed absorption and emission features in the full wavelength range (4290-9015 A) as well as the atmospheric parameters and photospheric abundances (under the Local Thermodinamic Equilibrium approximation) for the first time. The nebular parameters (Te, Ne) are also derived. We estimate Teff=24,000 K, log g=3.0, xi=7 kms-1 and the derived abundances indicate a slightly metal-deficient evolved star with C/O<1. The observed P-Cygni profiles of hydrogen and helium clearly indicate on-going post-AGB mass loss. The presence of [N II] and [S II] lines and the non-detection of [O III] indicate that photoionisation has just started. The observed spectral features, large heliocentric radial velocity, atmospheric parameters, and chemical composition indicate that I22023 is an evolved post-AGB star belonging to the old disk population. The derived nebular parameters (Te=7000 K, Ne=1.2x104 cm-3) also suggest that I22023 may be evolving into a compact, young low-excitation Planetary Nebula. Our optical spectroscopic analysis together with the recent Spitzer detection of double-dust chemistry (the simultaneous presence of carbonaceous molecules and amorphous silicates) in I22023 and other B-type post-AGB candidates may point to a binary system with a dusty disk as the stellar origin common to the hot post-AGB stars with O-rich central stars.
  • HII regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) both emit at radio and infrared (IR) wavelengths, and angularly small HII regions can be mistaken for PNe. This problem of classification is most severe for HII regions in an early evolutionary stage, those that are extremely distant, or those that are both young and distant. Using data from the Herschel Hi-GAL survey, as well as WISE and the Spitzer MIPSGAL and GLIMPSE surveys, we wish to establish characteristic IR colors that can be used to distinguish between HII regions and PNe. We perform aperture photometry measurements for a sample of 126 HII regions and 43 PNe at wavelengths from 8.0 micron to 500 micron. We find that HII regions and PNe have distinct IR colors. The most robust discriminating color criteria are [F12/F8] < 0.3, [F160/F12] > 1.3, and [F160/F24] > 0.8 (or alternately [F160/F22] > 0.8), where the brackets indicate the log of the flux ratio. All three of these criteria are individually satisfied by over 98% of our sample of HII regions and by about 10% of our sample of PNe. Combinations of these colors are more robust in separating the two populations; for example all HII regions and no PNe satisfy [F12/F8] < 0.4 and [F160/F22] > 0.8. When applied to objects of unknown classification, these criteria prove useful in separating the two populations. The dispersion in color is relatively small for HII regions; this suggests that any evolution in these colors with time for HII regions must be relatively modest. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of HII regions can be separated into "warm" and "cold" components. The "cold" component is well-fit by a grey-body of temperature 25K. The SEDs of nearly two-thirds of our sample of HII regions peak at 160 micron and one third peak at 70 micron. For PNe, 67% of the SEDs peak at 70 micron, 23% peak at either 22 micron or 24 micron, and 9% (two sources) peak at 160 micron.
  • We present ten new Spitzer detections of fullerenes in Magellanic Cloud Planetary Nebulae, including the first extragalactic detections of the C70 molecule. These new fullerene detections together with the most recent laboratory data permit us to report an accurate determination of the C60 and C70 abundances in space. Also, we report evidence for the possible detection of planar C24 in some of our fullerene sources, as indicated by the detection of very unusual emission features coincident with the strongest transitions of this molecule at ~6.6, 9.8, and 20 um. The infrared spectra display a complex mix of aliphatic and aromatic species such as hydrogenated amorphous carbon grains (HACs), PAH clusters, fullerenes, and small dehydrogenated carbon clusters (possible planar C24). The coexistence of such a variety of molecular species supports the idea that fullerenes are formed from the decomposition of HACs. We propose that fullerenes are formed from the destruction of HACs, possibly as a consequence of shocks driven by the fast stellar winds, which can sometimes be very strong in transition sources and young PNe. This is supported by the fact that many of our fullerene-detected PNe show altered [NeIII]/[NeII] ratios suggestive of shocks as well as P-Cygni profiles in their UV lines indicative of recently enhanced mass loss.
  • By tracing the distribution of cool dust in the extended envelopes of post-AGB stars and (proto)-planetary nebulae ((P)PNe) we aim to recover, or constrain, the mass loss history experienced by these stars in their recent past. The Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) instrument on board the AKARI satellite was used to obtain far-infrared maps for a selected sample of post-AGB stars and (P)PNe. We derived flux densities (aperture photometry) for 13 post-AGB stars and (P)PNe at four far-infrared wavelengths (60, 90, 140, and 160 um). Radial (azimuthally averaged) profiles are used to investigate the presence of extended emission from cool dust. No (detached) extended emission is detected for any target in our sample at levels significant with respect to background and cirrus emission. Only IRAS 21046+4739 reveals tentative excess emission between 30 and 130". Estimates of the total dust and gas mass from the obtained maps indicate that the envelope masses of these stars should be large in order to be detected with the AKARI FIS. Imaging with higher sensitivity and higher spatial resolution is needed to detect and resolve, if present, any cool compact or extended emission associated with these evolved stars.
  • The high-resolution (R=600) Spitzer/IRS spectrum of the bipolar proto-planetary nebula (PPN) IRAS 17423-1755 is presented in order to clarify the dominant chemistry (C-rich versus O-rich) of its circumstellar envelope as well as to constrain its evolutionary stage. The high quality Spitzer/IRS spectrum shows weak 9.7 um absorption from amorphous silicates. This confirms for the first time the O-rich nature of IRAS 17423-1755 in contradiction to a previous C-rich classification, which was based on the wrong identification of the strong 3.1 um absorption feature seen in the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) spectrum as due to acetylene (C2H2). The high-resolution Spitzer/IRS spectrum displays a complete lack of C-rich mid-IR features such as molecular absorption features (e.g., 13.7 um C2H2, 14.0 um HCN, etc.) or the classical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon infrared emission bands. Thus, the strong 3.1 um absorption band toward IRAS 17423-1755 has to be identified as water ice. In addition, a [Ne II] nebular emission line at 12.8 um is clearly detected, indicating that the ionization of its central region may be already started. The spectral energy distribution in the infrared (2-200 um) and other observational properties of IRAS 17423-1755 are discussed in comparison with the similar post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) objects IRAS 19343+2926 and IRAS 17393-2727. We conclude that IRAS 17423-1755 is an O-rich high-mass post-AGB object that represents a link between OH/IR stars with extreme outflows and highly bipolar PN.
  • MESS (Mass-loss of Evolved StarS) is a Guaranteed Time Key Program that uses the PACS and SPIRE instruments on board the Herschel Space Observatory to observe a representative sample of evolved stars, that include asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stars, planetary nebulae and red supergiants, as well as luminous blue variables, Wolf-Rayet stars and supernova remnants. In total, of order 150 objects are observed in imaging and about 50 objects in spectroscopy. This paper describes the target selection and target list, and the observing strategy. Key science projects are described, and illustrated using results obtained during Herschel's science demonstration phase. Aperture photometry is given for the 70 AGB and post-AGB stars observed up to October 17, 2010, which constitutes the largest single uniform database of far-IR and sub-mm fluxes for late-type stars.
  • Hydrogen depleted environments are considered an essential requirement for the formation of fullerenes. The recent detection of C60 and C70 fullerenes in what was interpreted as the hydrogen-poor inner region of a post-final helium shell flash Planetary Nebula (PN) seemed to confirm this picture. Here, we present evidence that challenges the current paradigm regarding fullerene formation, showing that it can take place in circumstellar environments containing hydrogen. We report the simultaneous detection of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and fullerenes towards C-rich and H-containing PNe belonging to environments with very different chemical histories such as our own Galaxy and the Small Magellanic Cloud. We suggest that PAHs and fullerenes may be formed by the photochemical processing of hydrogenated amorphous carbon. These observations suggest that modifications may be needed to our current understanding of the chemistry of large organic molecules as well as the chemical processing in space.
  • We present the first results of a high-spectral-resolution survey of the carbon-rich evolved star IRC+10216 that was carried out with the HIFI spectrometer onboard Herschel. This survey covers all HIFI bands, with a spectral range from 488 to 1901GHz. In this letter we focus on the band-1b spectrum, in a spectral range 554.5-636.5GHz, where we identified 130 spectral features with intensities above 0.03 K and a signal-to-noise ratio >5. Detected lines arise from HCN, SiO, SiS, CS, CO, metal-bearing species and, surprisingly, silicon dicarbide (SiC2). We identified 55 SiC2 transitions involving energy levels between 300 and 900 K. By analysing these rotational lines, we conclude that SiC2 is produced in the inner dust formation zone, with an abundance of ~2x10^-7 relative to molecular hydrogen. These SiC2 lines have been observed for the first time in space and have been used to derive an SiC2 rotational temperature of ~204 K and a source-averaged column density of ~6.4x10^15 cm^-2. Furthermore, the high quality of the HIFI data set was used to improve the spectroscopic rotational constants of SiC2.
  • S. Molinari, B. Swinyard, J. Bally, M. Barlow, J. P. Bernard, P. Martin, T. Moore, A. Noriega-Crespo, R. Plume, L. Testi, A. Zavagno, A. Abergel, B. Ali, L. Anderson, P. André, J. P. Baluteau, C. Battersby, M. T. Beltrán, M. Benedettini, N. Billot, J. Blommaert, S. Bontemps, F. Boulanger, J. Brand, C. Brunt, M. Burton, L. Calzoletti, S. Carey, P. Caselli, R. Cesaroni, J. Cernicharo, S. Chakrabarti, A. Chrysostomou, M. Cohen, M. Compiegne, P. de Bernardis, G. de Gasperis, A. M. di Giorgio, D. Elia, F. Faustini, N. Flagey, Y. Fukui, G. A. Fuller, K. Ganga, P. Garcia-Lario, J. Glenn, P. F. Goldsmith, M. J. Griffin, M. Hoare, M. Huang, D. Ikhenaode, C. Joblin, G. Joncas, M. Juvela, J. M. Kirk, G. Lagache, J. Z. Li, T. L. Lim, S. D. Lord, M. Marengo, D. J. Marshall, S. Masi, F. Massi, M. Matsuura, V. Minier, M. A. Miville-Deschenes, L. A. Montier, L. Morgan, F. Motte, J. C. Mottram, T. G. Mueller, P. Natoli, J. Neves, L. Olmi, R. Paladini, D. Paradis, H. Parsons, N. Peretto, M. Pestalozzi, S. Pezzuto, F. Piacentini, L. Piazzo, D. Polychroni, M. Pomarès, C. C. Popescu, W. T. Reach, I. Ristorcelli, J. F. Robitaille, T. Robitaille, J. A. Rodón, A. Roy, P. Royer, D. Russeil, P. Saraceno, M. Sauvage, P. Schilke, E. Schisano, N. Schneider, F. Schuller, B. Schulz, B. Sibthorpe, H. A. Smith, M. D. Smith, L. Spinoglio, D. Stamatellos, F. Strafella, G. S. Stringfellow, E. Sturm, R. Taylor, M. A. Thompson, A. Traficante, R. J. Tuffs, G. Umana, L. Valenziano, R. Vavrek, M. Veneziani, S. Viti, C. Waelkens, D. Ward-Thompson, G. White, L. A. Wilcock, F. Wyrowski, H. W. Yorke, Q. Zhang
    May 18, 2010 astro-ph.GA
    We present the first results from the science demonstration phase for the Hi-GAL survey, the Herschel key-project that will map the inner Galactic Plane of the Milky Way in 5 bands. We outline our data reduction strategy and present some science highlights on the two observed 2{\deg} x 2{\deg} tiles approximately centered at l=30{\deg} and l=59{\deg}. The two regions are extremely rich in intense and highly structured extended emission which shows a widespread organization in filaments. Source SEDs can be built for hundreds of objects in the two fields, and physical parameters can be extracted, for a good fraction of them where the distance could be estimated. The compact sources (which we will call 'cores' in the following) are found for the most part to be associated with the filaments, and the relationship to the local beam-averaged column density of the filament itself shows that a core seems to appear when a threshold around A_V of about 1 is exceeded for the regions in the l=59{\deg} field; a A_V value between 5 and 10 is found for the l=30{\deg} field, likely due to the relatively larger distances of the sources. This outlines an exciting scenario where diffuse clouds first collapse into filaments, which later fragment to cores where the column density has reached a critical level. In spite of core L/M ratios being well in excess of a few for many sources, we find core surface densities between 0.03 and 0.5 g cm-2. Our results are in good agreement with recent MHD numerical simulations of filaments forming from large-scale converging flows.
  • We investigate Galactic bulge planetary nebulae without emission-line central stars for which peculiar infrared spectra have been obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, including the simultaneous signs of oxygen and carbon based dust. Three separate sub-groups can be defined characterized by the different chemical composition of the dust and the presence of crystalline and amorphous silicates. We find that the classification based on the dust properties is reflected in the more general properties of these planetary nebulae. However, some observed properties are difficult to relate to the common view of planetary nebulae. In particular, it is challenging to interpret the peculiar gas chemical composition of many analyzed objects in the standard picture of the evolution of planetary nebulae progenitors. We confirm that the dual-dust chemistry phenomenon is not limited to planetary nebulae with emission-line central stars.
  • We present AKARI/IRC observations of a sample of six extremely red IRAS sources, of which three are variable OH/IR stars and the rest are early post-AGB stars. The OH/IR stars show a red continuum with the expected strong 10 micron silicate absorption feature, while the post-AGB stars show an even redder continuum accompanied with a comparably weak silicate absorption. We modelled the spectral energy distributions with DUSTY. While for the OH/IR stars a reasonable fit can be obtained with almost pure silicate dust, the post-AGB stars require a mixture of silicate and carbon-rich dust. We assume that in the latter objects the inner dust shell is carbon-rich, while the outer shells are still oxygen-rich.
  • We present AKARI/IRC and Spitzer/IRS observations of a selected sample of galactic IRAS sources considered to be heavily obscured AGB/post-AGB stars based on their characteristic IRAS colours. All of them are completely invisible in the optical range but extremely bright in the infrared. Based on AKARI and Spitzer spectroscopy and using DUSTY we are able to determine the dominant chemistry of their circumstellar shells as well as the properties of the dust grains contained in these shells. Most of the sources are found to be C-rich (being the reddest C-rich stars observed so far). We find only molecular absorptions (and no PAH features) such as acetylene (C2H2) at 13.7 micron, indicative of an early post-AGB stage. We shortly discuss our findings in the context of stellar evolution during the hidden "transition phase" from AGB stars to Planetary Nebulae.
  • We present high-resolution (R~60,000) optical spectra of a carefully selected sample of heavily obscured and presumably massive O-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). We report the discovery of strong Rb I lines at 7800 A in four Rb-rich LMC stars at luminosities equal to or greater than the standard adopted luminosity limit for AGB stars (Mbol~-7.1), confirming that "Hot Bottom Burning" (HBB) may produce a flux excess in the more massive AGB stars. In the SMC sample, just one of the five stars with Mbol<-7.1 was detected in Rb; the other stars may be massive red supergiants. The Rb-rich LMC AGB stars might have stellar masses of at least ~6-7 Msun. Our abundance analysis show that these Rb-rich stars are extremely enriched in Rb by up to 10^3-10^5 times solar but seem to have only mild Zr enhancements. The high Rb/Zr ratios, if real, represent a severe problem for the s-process, even if the 22Ne source is operational as expected for massive AGB stars; it is not possible to synthesize copious amounts of Rb without also overproducing Zr. The solution to the problem may lie with an incomplete present understanding of the atmospheres of luminous AGB stars.
  • The AKARI and Spitzer satellites provided an unique opportunity to observe a variety of stars, which are considered as departing from the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) and have started their post-AGB evolution recently. Most of these stars are absent optically and are bright in the mid-IR wavelength range. Spectra of close to 200 objects have been obtained. For all of them the 1-60 micron spectral energy distribution has been constructed using photometric data from various surveys. We report here on the results of Spitzer observations of 88 IRAS selected post-AGB candidates and discuss them in comparison to the results of the AKARI observations of post-AGB candidates reported elsewhere in these proceedings. The dust compositions can be divided broadly in oxygen- and carbon-rich types, but a variety of intermediate types have been found. Among the oxygen-rich stars amorphous dust prevails, but a few sources show emission features from crystalline dust. The spectra from carbon-rich shells may be completely featureless, may show emission features from PAHs or a molecular absorption line from C2H2. We found also sources with a neon emission line at 12.8 micron. More than a third of all sources show a near-infrared excess at < 5 micron and almost all of them show evidence of C-rich dust in their shells. We postulate that the emerging post-AGB wind after the end of AGB evolution contains always carbon-rich dust irrespective of the chemistry of the former AGB star.
  • We investigate the dual-dust chemistry (DDC) phenomenon in PNe and discuss reasons for its occurrence, by analyzing Spitzer/IRS spectra of a sample of 40 Galactic PNe among which 26 belong to the Galactic Bulge (GB). The mixed chemistry is derived from the simultaneous detection of PAH features in the 6-14 micron range and crystalline silicates (CS) beyond 20 microns in the Spitzer/IRS spectra. Out of the 26 PNe observed in the GB, 21 show signatures of DDC. Our observations reveal that the simultaneous presence of O- and C-rich dust features in the IR spectra of [WC]-type PNe is not restricted to late/cool [WC]-type stars, as previously suggested in the literature, but is a common feature associated with all [WC]-type PNe. Surprisingly, we found that the DDC is seen also in all observed wels, as well as in other PNe with central stars being neither [WC] nor wels. Most sources observed display CS features in their spectra, with only a few PNe exhibiting, in addition, amorphous silicate bands. We appear to detect a recent change of chemistry at the end of the AGB evolution in the low-mass, high-metallicity population of GB PNe observed. The deficit of C-rich AGB stars in this environment suggests that the process of PAH formation in PNe occurs at the very end of the AGB phase. In addition, the population of low-mass, O-rich AGB stars in the GB, do not exhibit CS features in their spectra. Thus, the high detection rate of DDC that we find cannot be explained by long-lived O-rich (primordial or circumbinary) disks. Our most plausible scenario is a final thermal pulse on the AGB (or just after), which could produce enhanced mass loss, capable of removing/mixing (sometimes completely) the remaining H-rich envelope and exposing the internal C-rich layers, and generating shocks responsible for the silicate crystallization.