• The 2008 discovery of an eruption of M31N 2008-12a began a journey on which the true nature of this remarkable recurrent nova continues to be revealed. M31N 2008-12a contains a white dwarf close to the Chandrasekhar limit, accreting at a high rate from its companion, and undergoes thermonuclear eruptions which are observed yearly and may even be twice as frequent. In this paper, we report on Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph ultraviolet spectroscopy taken within days of the predicted 2015 eruption, coupled with Keck spectroscopy of the 2013 eruption. Together, this spectroscopy permits the reddening to be constrained to E(B-V) = 0.10 +/- 0.03. The UV spectroscopy reveals evidence for highly ionized, structured, and high velocity ejecta at early times. No evidence for neon is seen in these spectra however, but it may be that little insight can be gained regarding the composition of the white dwarf (CO vs ONe).
  • The recurrent nova M31N 2008-12a experiences annual eruptions, contains a near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf, and has the largest mass accretion rate in any nova system. In this paper, we present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3/UVIS photometry of the late decline of the 2015 eruption. We couple these new data with archival HST observations of the quiescent system and Keck spectroscopy of the 2014 eruption. The late-time photometry reveals a rapid decline to a minimum luminosity state, before a possible recovery / re-brightening in the run-up to the next eruption. Comparison with accretion disk models supports the survival of the accretion disk during the eruptions, and uncovers a quiescent disk mass accretion rate of the order of $10^{-6}\,M_\odot\,\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$, which may rise beyond $10^{-5}\,M_\odot\,\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$ during the super-soft source phase - both of which could be problematic for a number of well-established nova eruption models. Such large accretion rates, close to the Eddington limit, might be expected to be accompanied by additional mass loss from the disk through a wind and even collimated outflows. The archival HST observations, combined with the disk modeling, provide the first constraints on the mass donor; $L_\mathrm{donor}=103^{+12}_{-11}\,L_\odot$, $R_\mathrm{donor}=14.14^{+0.46}_{-0.47}\,R_\odot$, and $T_\mathrm{eff, donor}=4890\pm110$ K, which may be consistent with an irradiated M31 red-clump star. Such a donor would require a system orbital period $\gtrsim5$ days. Our updated analysis predicts that the M31N 2008-12a WD could reach the Chandrasekhar mass in < 20 kyr.
  • We present HST spectroscopy for 45 cataclysmic variables (CVs), observed with HST/COS and HST/STIS. For 36 CVs, the white dwarf is recognisable through its broad Ly$\alpha$ absorption profile and we measure the white dwarf effective temperatures ($T_{\mathrm{eff}}$) by fitting the HST data assuming $\log\,g=8.35$, which corresponds to the average mass for CV white dwarfs ($\simeq\,0.8\,\mathrm{M}_\odot$). Our results nearly double the number of CV white dwarfs with an accurate temperature measurement. We find that CVs above the period gap have, on average, higher temperatures ($\langle T_{\mathrm{eff}} \rangle \simeq 23\,000\,$K) and exhibit much more scatter compared to those below the gap ($\langle T_{\mathrm{eff}} \rangle \simeq 15\,000\,$K). While this behaviour broadly agrees with theoretical predictions, some discrepancies are present: (i) all our new measurements above the gap are characterised by lower temperatures ($T_{\mathrm{eff}} \simeq 16\,000 - 26\,000\,$K) than predicted by the present day CV population models ($T_{\mathrm{eff}} \simeq 38\,000 - 43\,000\,$K); (ii) our results below the gap are not clustered in the predicted narrow track and exhibit in particular a relatively large spread near the period minimum, which may point to some shortcomings in the CV evolutionary models. Finally, in the standard model of CV evolution, reaching the minimum period, CVs are expected to evolve back towards longer periods with mean accretion rates $\dot{M}\lesssim 2 \times 10^{-11}\,\mathrm{M}_\odot\,\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$, corresponding to $T_\mathrm{eff}\lesssim 11\,500\,$K. We do not unambiguously identify any such system in our survey, suggesting that this major component of the predicted CV population still remains elusive to observations.
  • The Andromeda Galaxy recurrent nova M31N 2008-12a had been observed in eruption ten times, including yearly eruptions from 2008-2014. With a measured recurrence period of $P_\mathrm{rec}=351\pm13$ days (we believe the true value to be half of this) and a white dwarf very close to the Chandrasekhar limit, M31N 2008-12a has become the leading pre-explosion supernova type Ia progenitor candidate. Following multi-wavelength follow-up observations of the 2013 and 2014 eruptions, we initiated a campaign to ensure early detection of the predicted 2015 eruption, which triggered ambitious ground and space-based follow-up programs. In this paper we present the 2015 detection; visible to near-infrared photometry and visible spectroscopy; and ultraviolet and X-ray observations from the Swift observatory. The LCOGT 2m (Hawaii) discovered the 2015 eruption, estimated to have commenced at Aug. $28.28\pm0.12$ UT. The 2013-2015 eruptions are remarkably similar at all wavelengths. New early spectroscopic observations reveal short-lived emission from material with velocities $\sim13000$ km s$^{-1}$, possibly collimated outflows. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of the eruption provide strong evidence supporting a red giant donor. An apparently stochastic variability during the early super-soft X-ray phase was comparable in amplitude and duration to past eruptions, but the 2013 and 2015 eruptions show evidence of a brief flux dip during this phase. The multi-eruption Swift/XRT spectra show tentative evidence of high-ionization emission lines above a high-temperature continuum. Following Henze et al. (2015a), the updated recurrence period based on all known eruptions is $P_\mathrm{rec}=174\pm10$ d, and we expect the next eruption of M31N 2008-12a to occur around mid-Sep. 2016.
  • Non-radial pulsations have been identified in a number of accreting white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables. These stars offer insight into the excitation of pulsation modes in atmospheres with mixed compositions of hydrogen, helium, and metals, and the response of these modes to changes in the white dwarf temperature. Among all pulsating cataclysmic variable white dwarfs, GW Librae stands out by having a well-established observational record of three independent pulsation modes that disappeared when the white dwarf temperature rose dramatically following its 2007 accretion outburst. Our analysis of HST ultraviolet spectroscopy taken in 2002, 2010 and 2011, showed that pulsations produce variations in the white dwarf effective temperature as predicted by theory. Additionally in May~2013, we obtained new HST/COS ultraviolet observations that displayed unexpected behaviour: besides showing variability at ~275s, which is close to the post-outburst pulsations detected with HST in 2010 and 2011, the white dwarf exhibits high-amplitude variability on a ~4.4h time-scale. We demonstrate that this variability is produced by an increase of the temperature of a region on white dwarf covering up to ~30 per cent of the visible white dwarf surface. We argue against a short-lived accretion episode as the explanation of such heating, and discuss this event in the context of non-radial pulsations on a rapidly rotating star
  • With six recorded nova outbursts, the prototypical recurrent nova T Pyxidis is the ideal cataclysmic variable system to assess the net change of the white dwarf mass within a nova cycle. Recent estimates of the mass ejected in the 2011 outburst ranged from a few 1.E-5 sollar mass to 3.3E-4 sollar mass, and assuming a mass accretion rate of 1.E-8 to 1.E-7 Sollar mass/yr for 44yrs, it has been concluded that the white dwaf in T Pyx is actually losing mass. Using NLTE disk modeling spectra to fit our recently obtained Hubble Space Telescope (HST) COS and STIS spectra, we find a mass accretion rate of up to two orders of magnitude larger than previously estimated. Our larger mass accretion rate is due mainly to the newly derived distance of T Pyx (4.8kpc; Sokoloski et al. 2013, larger than the previous 3.5kpc estimate), our derived reddening of E(B-V)=0.35 (based on combined IUE and GALEX spectra) and NLTE disk modeling (compared to black body and raw flux estimates in earlier works). We find that for most values of the reddening (0.25 < E(B-V) < 0.50) and white dwaf mass (0.70 to 1.35 Sollar mass) the accreted mass is larger than the ejected mass. Only for a low reddening (0.25 and smaller) combined with a large white dwaf mass (0.9 sollar mass and larger) is the ejected mass larger than the accreted one. However, the best spectral fitting results are obtained for a larger value of the reddening.
  • AG Dra is a symbiotic variable consisting of a metal poor, yellow giant mass donor under-filling its Roche lobe, and a hot accreting white dwarf, possibly surrounded by an optically thick, bright accretion disk which could be present from wind accretion. We constructed NLTE synthetic spectral models for white dwarf spectra and optically thick accretion disk spectra to model a FUSE spectrum of AG Dra, obtained when the hot component is viewed in front of the yellow giant. The spectrum has been de-reddened (E(B-V) = 0.05) and the model fitting carried out, with the distance regarded as a free parameter, but required to be larger than the Hipparcos lower limit of 1 kpc. We find that the best-fitting model is a bare accreting white dwarf with Mwd = 0.4 Msun, Teff = 80,000K and a model-derived distance of 1543 pc. Higher temperatures are ruled out due to excess flux at the shortest wavelengths while a lower temperature decreases the distance below 1 kpc. Any accretion disk which might be present is a only a minor contributor to the FUV flux. This raises the possibility that the soft X-rays originate from a very hot boundary layer between a putative accretion disk and the accreting star.
  • We present an online catalog containing spectra and supporting information for cataclysmic variables that have been observed with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). For each object in the catalog we list some of the basic system parameters such as (RA,Dec), period, inclination, white dwarf mass, as well as information on the available FUSE spectra: data ID, observation date and time, and exposure time. In addition, we provide parameters needed for the analysis of the FUSE spectra such as the reddening E(B-V), distance, and state (high, low, intermediate) of the system at the time it was observed. For some of these spectra we have carried out model fits to the continuum with synthetic stellar and/or disk spectra using the codes TLUSTY and SYNSPEC. We provide the parameters obtained from these model fits; this includes the white dwarf temperature, gravity, projected rotational velocity and elemental abundances of C, Si, S and N, together with the disk mass accretion rate, the resulting inclination and model-derived distance (when unknown). For each object one or more figures are provided (as gif files) with line identification and model fit(s) when available. The FUSE spectra as well as the synthetic spectra are directly available for download as ascii tables. References are provided for each object as well as for the model fits. In this article we present 36 objects, and additional ones will be added to the online catalog in the future. In addition to cataclysmic variables, we also include a few related objects, such as a wind accreting white dwarf, a pre-cataclysmic variable and some symbiotics.
  • We have carried out an analysis of the HST STIS archival spectra of the magnetic white dwarf in the Hyades eclipsing-spectroscopic, post-common envelope binary V471 Tauri, time resolved on the orbit and on the X-ray rotational phase of the magnetic white dwarf. An HST STIS spectrum obtained during primary eclipse reveals a host of transition region/chromospheric emission features including N V (1238, 1242), Si IV (1393, 1402), C IV (1548, 1550) and He II (1640). The spectroscopic characteristics and emission line fluxes of the transition region/chromosphere of the very active, rapidly rotating, K2V component of V471 Tauri, are compared with the emission characteristics of fast rotating K dwarfs in young open clusters. We have detected a number of absorption features associated with metals accreted onto the photosphere of the magnetic white dwarf from which we derive radial velocities. All of the absorption features are modulated on the 555s rotation period of the white dwarf with maximum line strength at rotational phase 0.0 when the primary magnetic accretion region is facing the observer. The photospheric absorption features show no clear evidence of Zeeman splitting and no evidence of a correlation between their variations in strength and orbital phase. We report clear evidence of a secondary accretion pole. We derive C and Si abundances from the Si IV and C III features. All other absorption lines are either interstellar or associated with a region above the white dwarf and/or with coronal mass ejection events illuminated as they pass in front of the white dwarf.
  • We present an analysis of X-ray and UV data obtained with the XMM-Newton Observatory of the long period dwarf nova RU Peg. RU Peg contains a massive white dwarf, possibly the hottest white dwarf in a dwarf nova, it has a low inclination, thus optimally exposing its X-ray emitting boundary layer, and has an excellent trigonometric parallax distance. We modeled the X-ray data using XSPEC assuming a multi-temperature plasma emission model built from the MEKAL code. We obtained a maximum temperature of 31.7 keV, based on the EPIC MOS1, 2 and pn data, indicating that RU Peg has an X-ray spectrum harder than most dwarf novae, except U Gem. This result is consistent with and indirectly confirms the large mass of the white dwarf in RU Peg. The X-ray luminosity we computed corresponds to a boundary layer luminosity for a mass accretion rate of 2.E-11 Msun/yr (assuming Mwd=1.3Msun), in agreement with an expected quiescent accretion rate. The modeling of the O VIII emission line at 19A as observed by the RGS implies a projected stellar rotational velocity of 695 km/s, i.e. the line is emitted from material rotating at about 936-1245 km/s (for i about 34-48deg) or about 1/6 of the Keplerian speed; this velocity is much larger than the rotation speed of the white dwarf inferred from the FUSE spectrum. Cross-correlation analysis yielded an undelayed component and a delayed component of 116 +/- 17 sec where the X-ray variations/fluctuations lagged the UV variations. This indicates that the UV fluctuations in the inner disk are propagated into the X-ray emitting region in about 116 sec. The undelayed component may be related to irradiation effects.
  • We present an analysis of the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) far ultraviolet snapshot spectrum of the dwarf nova BZ UMa taken during quiescence. We find that the flux continuum is consistent with that of a white dwarf atmosphere with a temperature of 15,000K, and a distance of about 156pc when assuming a white dwarf gravity of log(g)=7.5. We also show that the hydrogen quasi-molecular satellite lines opacity affects the spectrum around 1300-1400 A and has to be included to fine-tune the spectral modeling, this is self-consistent with the low stellar temperature we find.
  • We carry out a spectral analysis of the archival FUSE spectrum of the VY Scl nova-like cataclysmic variable MV Lyrae obtained in the high state. We find that standard disk models fail to fit the flux in the shorter wavelengths of FUSE (< 950$A). An improved fit is obtained by including a modeling of the boundary layer at the inner edge of the disk. The result of the modeling shows that in the high state the disk has a moderate accretion rate of about 2.E09 solar mass per year, a low inclination, a boundary layer with a temperature of around 100,000K, and size 0.20Rwd, and the white dwarf is possibly heated up to a temperature of 50,000K or higher.
  • We present an analysis of the FUSE spectra of eight high-declination dwarf novae obtained from a Cycle 7 FUSE survey. These DN systems have not been previously studied in the UV and little is known about their white dwarfs (WDs) or accretion disks. We carry out the spectral analysis of the FUSE data using synthetic spectra generated with the codes TLUSTY and SYNSPEC. For two faint objects (AQ Men, V433 Ara) we can only assess a lower limit for the WD temperature or mass accretion rate. NSV 10934 was caught in a quiescent state and its spectrum is consistent with a low mass accretion rate disk. For 5 objects (HP Nor, DT Aps, AM Cas, FO Per and ES Dra) we obtain WD temperatures between 34,000K and 40,000K and/or mass accretion rates consistent with intermediate to outburst states. These temperatures reflect the heating of the WD due to on-going accretion and are similar to the temperatures of other DNs observed on the rise to, and in decline from outburst. The WD Temperatures we obtain should therefore be considered as upper limits, and it is likely that during quiescence AM Cas, FO Per and ES Dra are near the average WD Teff for catalcysmic variables above the period gap (30,000K), similar to U Gem, SS Aur and RX And.
  • We present a spectral analysis of the FUSE spectra of EM Cygni, a Z Cam DN system. The FUSE spectrum, obtained in quiescence, consists of 4 individual exposures (orbits): two exposures, at orbital phases phi ~ 0.65 and phi ~ 0.90, have a lower flux; and two exposures, at orbital phases phi =0.15 and 0.45, have a relatively higher flux. The change of flux level as a function of the orbital phase is consistent with the stream material (flowing over and below the disk from the hot spot region to smaller radii) partially masking the white dwarf. We carry out a spectral analysis of the FUSE data, obtained at phase 0.45 (when the flux is maximual, using the codes TLUSTY and SYNSPEC. Using a single white dwarf spectral component, we obtain a white dwarf temperature of 40,000K, rotating at 100km/s. The white dwarf, or conceivably, the material overflowing the disk rim, shows suprasolar abundances of silicon, sulphur and possibly nitrogen. Using a white dwarf+disk composite model, we obtain that the white dwarf temperature could be even as high as 50,000K, contributing more than 90% of the FUV flux, and the disk contributing less than 10% must have a mass accretion rate reaching 1.E-10 Msun/yr.In both cases, however, we obtain that the white dwarf temperature is much higher than previously estimated.
  • We present an analysis of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer ({\it{FUSE}}) spectra of the little-known southern nova-like BB Doradus. The spectrum was obtained as part of our Cycle 8 {\it FUSE} survey of high declination nova-like stars. The FUSE spectrum of BB Dor, observed in a high state, is modeled with an accretion disk with a very low inclination (possibly lower than 10deg). Assuming an average WD mass of 0.8 solar leads to a mass accretion rate of 1.E-9 Solar mass/year and a distance of the order of 650 pc, consistent with the extremely low galactic reddening in its direction. The spectrum presents some broad and deep silicon and sulfur absorption lines, indicating that these elements are over-abundant by 3 and 20 times solar, respectively.
  • We present a synthetic spectral analysis of Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) spectra of 5 dwarf novae above and below the period gap during quiescence. We use our synthetic spectral code, including options for the treatment of the hydrogen quasi-molecular satellite lines (for low temperature stellar atmospheres), NLTE approximation (for high temperature stellar atmospheres), and for one system (RU Peg) we model the interstellar medium (ISM) molecular and atomic hydrogen lines. In all the systems presented here the FUV flux continuum is due to the WD. These spectra also exhibit some broad emission lines. In this work we confirm some of the previous FUV analysis results but we also present new results. For 4 systems we combine the FUSE and STIS spectra to cover a larger wavelength range and to improve the spectral fit. This work is part of our broader HST archival research program, in which we aim to provide accurate system parameters for cataclysmic variables above and below the period gap by combining FUSE and HST FUV spectra.
  • We present the results of a synthetic spectral analysis of HST STIS spectra of five long period dwarf novae obtained during their quiescence to determine the properties of their white dwarfs which are little known for systems above the CV period gap. The five systems, TU Men, BD Pav, SS Aur, TT Crt, and V442 Cen were observed as part of an HST Snapshot project. The spectra are described and fitted with combinations of white dwarf photospheres and accretion disks. We provide evidence that the white dwarfs in all five systems are at least partially exposed. We discuss the evolutionary implications of our model fitting results and compare these dwarf novae to previously analyzed FUV spectra of other dwarf novae above the period gap. The dispersion in CV WD temperatures above the period gap is substantially greater than one finds below the period gap where there is a surprisingly narrow dispersion in temperatures around 15,000K. There appears to be a larger spread of surface temperatures in dwarf novae above the period than is seen below the gap.
  • We present a spectral analysis of the dereddened FUSE and HST/STIS spectra separately and combined together assuming E(B-V)=0.1 & 0.2. Overall, we find that the model fits are in much better agreement with the dereddened spectra when E(B-V) is large, as excess emission in the longer wavelengths render the slope of the observed spectra almost impossible to fit, unless E(B-V)=0.2 . The best fit accretion disk model is obtained for E(B-V)=0.2 . A single white dwarf model leads to a rather hot temperature (30,000K < Twd < 55,000K depending on the assumptions) but does not provide a fit as good as the accretion disk model. A combination of a white dwarf plus a disk does not lead to a better fit. The same best fit disk model is consistently obtained when fitting the FUSE and HST/STIS spectra individually and when combined together, implying therefore that the disk model is the best fit not only in the least chi2 sense, but also as a consistent solution across a large wavelength span of observation. This is not the case with the single white dwarf model fitting which leads to a different (and therefore inconsistent) temperature for each different spectrum FUSE, STIS and FUSE+STIS.
  • We present the last HST/STIS E140M FUV spectrum (1150-1725A) of the dwarf nova (DN) WZ Sge, obtained in July 2004, 3 years following the early superoutburst of July 2001. Single white dwarf (WD) synthetic spectral fits (log{g}=8.5) to the data indicate that the WD has a temperature T~15,000K, about ~1500K above its quiescent temperature and it is still showing the effect of the outburst. Taking into account temperature estimates of the earlier phase of the cooling, we model the cooling curve of WZ Sge, over a period of 3 years, using a stellar evolution code including accretion and the effects of compressional heating. Assuming that compressional heating alone is the source of the energy released during the cooling phase, we find that (1) the mass of the white dwarf must be quite large (~1.0 Msun); and (2) the mass accretion rate must have a time-averaged (over 52 days of outburst) value of the order of 1.E-8 Msun/yr or larger. The outburst mass accretion rate derived from these compressional heating models is larger than the rates estimated from optical observations and from a FUV spectral fit by up to one order of magnitude. This implies that during the cooling phase the energy released by the WD is not due to compressional heating alone.
  • We present a synthetic spectral analysis of IUE archival and FUSE FUV spectra of the peculiar dwarf nova WW Ceti. During the quiescence of WW Ceti, a white dwarf with Twd=26,000K can account for the FUV flux and yields the proper distance. However, the best agreement with the observations is provided by a two-temperature white dwarf model with a cooler white dwarf at Twd=25,000K providing 75% of the FUV flux and a hotter region (accretion belt or optically thick disk ring) with T=40,000K contributing 25% of the flux for the proper distance. We find from the FUSE spectrum that the white dwarf is rotating with a projected rotational velocity V sin{i} = 600 km/s. Our temperature results provide an additional data point in the distribution of Twd versus orbital period above the CV period gap where few Twds are available.
  • We have analyzed the Far Ultraviolet Spectrocopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of two U Gem-Type dwarf novae, SS Aur and RU Peg, observed 28 days and 60 days (respectively) after their last outburst. In both systems the FUSE spectra (905 - 1182 A) reveal evidence of the underlying accreting white dwarf exposed in the far UV. Our grid of theoretical models yielded a best-fitting photosphere to the FUSE spectra with Teff=31,000K for SS Aur and Teff=49,000K for RU Peg. This work provides two more dwarf nova systems with known white dwarf temperatures above the period gap where few are known. The absence of CIII (1175 A) absorption in SS Aur and the elevation of N above solar suggests the possibility that SS Aur represents an additional accreting white dwarf where the surface C/N ratio derives from CNO processing. For RU Peg, the modeling uncertainties prevent any reliable conclusions about the surface abundances and rotational velocity.
  • FUSE and HST/STIS spectra of the dwarf nova WZ Sge, obtained during and following the early superoutburst of July 2001 over a time span of 20 months, monitor changes in the components of the system during its different phases. The synthetic spectral fits to the data indicate a cooling in response to the outburst of about 12,000K, from about 28,000K down to about 16,000K. The cooling time scale tau (of the white dwarf temperature excess) is of the order of about 100 days in the early phase of the cooling period, and increases to about 850 days toward the end of the second year following the outburst. In the present work, we numerically model the accretional heating and subsequent cooling of the accreting white dwarf in WZ Sge. The best compressional heating model fit is obtained for a 1.2 Msun white dwarf accreting at a rate of 9.E-9 Msun/yr for 52 days. However, if one assumes a lower mass accretion rate or a lower white dwarf mass, then compressional heating alone cannot account for the observed temperature decline, and other sources of heating have to be included to increase the temperature of the model to the observed value. We quantitatively check the effect of boundary layer irradiation as such an additional source.
  • We present a time series analysis of Hubble Space Telescope observations of WZ Sge obtained in 2001 September, October, November and December as WZ Sge declined from its 2001 July superoutburst. Previous analysis of these data showed the temperature of the white dwarf decreased from ~29,000 K to ~18,000 K. In this study we binned the spectra over wavelength to yield ultraviolet light curves at each epoch that were then analyzed for the presence of the well-known 27.87 s and 28.96 s oscillations. We detect the 29 s periodicity at all four epochs, but the 28 s periodicity is absent. The origin of these oscillations has been debated since their discovery in the 1970s and competing hypotheses are based on either white dwarf non-radial g-mode pulsations or magnetically-channelled accretion onto a rotating white dwarf. By analogy with the ZZ Ceti stars, we argue that the non-radial g-mode pulsation model demands a strong dependence of pulse period on the white dwarf's temperature. However, these observations show the 29 s oscillation is independent of the white dwarf's temperature. Thus we reject the white dwarf non-radial g-mode pulsation hypothesis as the sole origin of the oscillations. It remains unclear if magnetically-funnelled accretion onto a rapidly rotating white dwarf (or belt on the white dwarf) is responsible for producing the oscillations. We also report the detection of a QPO with period ~18 s in the September light curve. The amplitudes of the 29 s oscillation and the QPO vary erratically on short timescales and are not correlated with the mean system brightness nor with each other.