• The relative abundance of the dust grain types in the interstellar medium (ISM) is directly linked to physical quantities that trace the evolution of galaxies. We study the dust properties of the whole disc of M33 at spatial scales of ~170 pc. This analysis allows us to infer how the relative dust grain abundance changes with the conditions of the ISM, study the existence of a submillimetre excess and look for trends of the gas-to-dust mass ratio (GDR) with other physical properties of the galaxy. For each pixel in the disc of M33 we fit the infrared SED using a physically motivated dust model that assumes an emissivity index beta close to 2. We derive the relative amount of the different dust grains in the model, the total dust mass, and the strength of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF) heating the dust at each spatial location. The relative abundance of very small grains tends to increase, and for big grains to decrease, at high values of Halpha luminosity. This shows that the dust grains are modified inside the star-forming regions, in agreement with a theoretical framework of dust evolution under different physical conditions. The radial dependence of the GDR is consistent with the shallow metallicity gradient observed in this galaxy. The strength of the ISRF derived in our model correlates with the star formation rate in the galaxy in a pixel by pixel basis. Although this is expected it is the first time that a correlation between both quantities is reported. We produce a map of submillimetre excess in the 500 microns SPIRE band for the disc of M33. The excess can be as high as 50% and increases at large galactocentric distances. We further study the relation of the excess with other physical properties of the galaxy and find that the excess is prominent in zones of diffuse ISM outside the main star-forming regions, where the molecular gas and dust surface density are low.
  • Aims. We study the effect of large scale dynamics on the molecular composition of the dense interstellar medium during the transition between diffuse to dense clouds. Methods. We followed the formation of dense clouds (on sub-parsec scales) through the dynamics of the interstellar medium at galac- tic scales. We used results from smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations from which we extracted physical parameters that are used as inputs for our full gas-grain chemical model. In these simulations, the evolution of the interstellar matter is followed for ~50 Myr. The warm low-density interstellar medium gas flows into spiral arms where orbit crowding produces the shock formation of dense clouds, which are held together temporarily by the external pressure. Results. We show that depending on the physical history of each SPH particle, the molecular composition of the modeled dense clouds presents a high dispersion in the computed abundances even if the local physical properties are similar. We find that carbon chains are the most affected species and show that these differences are directly connected to differences in (1) the electronic fraction, (2) the C/O ratio, and (3) the local physical conditions. We argue that differences in the dynamical evolution of the gas that formed dense clouds could account for the molecular diversity observed between and within these clouds. Conclusions. This study shows the importance of past physical conditions in establishing the chemical composition of the dense medium.
  • Cyclic-C3HD (c-C3HD) is a singly deuterated isotopologue of c-C3H2, which is one of the most abundant and widespread molecules in our Galaxy. We observed IRAS 16293-2422 in the 3 mm band with a single frequency setup using the EMIR heterodyne 3 mm receiver of the IRAM 30m telescope. We observed seven lines of c-C3HD and three lines of c-C3H2. Observed abundances are compared with astrochemical simulations using the NAUTILUS gas-grain chemical model. Our results clearly show that c-C3HD can be used as an important supplement for studying chemistry and physical conditions for cold environments. Assuming that the size of the protostellar envelope is 3000 AU and same excitation temperatures for both c-C3H2 and c-C3HD, we obtain a deuterium fraction of $14_{-3}^{+4}\%$.
  • Deuterated species are unique and powerful tools in astronomy since they can probe the physical conditions, chemistry, and ionization level of various astrophysical media. Recent observations of several deuterated species along with some of their spin isomeric forms have rekindled the interest for more accurate studies on deuterium fractionation. This paper presents the first publicly available chemical network of multiply deuterated species along with spin chemistry implemented on the latest state-of-the-art gas-grain chemical code `NAUTILUS'. D/H ratios for all deuterated species observed at different positions of TMC-1 are compared with the results of our model, which considers multiply deuterated species along with the spin chemistry of light hydrogen bearing species H2, H2+, H3+ and their isotopologues. We also show the differences in the modeled abundances of non-deuterated species after the inclusion of deuteration and spin chemistry in the model. Finally, we present a list of potentially observable deuterated species in TMC-1 awaiting detection.
  • Recent detections of complex organic molecules in dark clouds have rekindled interest in the astrochemical modeling of these environments. Because of its relative closeness and rich molecular complexity, TMC-1 has been extensively observed to study the chemical processes taking place in dark clouds. We use local thermodynamical equilibrium radiative transfer modeling coupled with a Bayesian statistical method which takes into account outliers to analyze the data from the Nobeyama spectral survey of TMC-1 between 8 and 50 GHz. We compute the abundance relative to molecular hydrogen of 57 molecules, including 19 isotopologues in TMC-1 along with their associated uncertainty. The new results are in general agreement with previous abundance determination from Ohishi & Kaifu and the values reported in the review from Agundez & Wakelam. However, in some cases, large opacity and low signal to noise effects allow only upper or lower limits to be derived, respectively.
  • [Abridged] Do some environments favor efficient conversion of molecular gas into stars? To answer this, we need to be able to estimate the H2 mass. Traditionally, this is done using CO and a few assumptions but the Herschel observations in the FIR make it possible to estimate the molecular gas mass independently of CO. Previous attempts to derive gas masses from dust emission suffered from biases. Generally, dust surface densities, HI column densities, and CO intensities are used to derive a gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) and the local CO intensity to H2 column density ratio (XCO), sometimes allowing for an additional CO-dark gas component (Kdark). We tested earlier methods, revealing degeneracies among the parameters, and then used a Bayesian formalism to derive the most likely values for each of the parameters mentioned above as a function of position in the nearby low metallicity spiral galaxy M33. The data are from the IRAM 30m CO(2-1) line, high-resolution HI and Herschel dust continuum observations. Solving for GDR, XCO, and Kdark in macro pixels 500 pc in size, we find that (i) allowing for CO-dark gas significantly improves fits; (ii) Kdark decreases with galactocentric distance; (iii) GDR is slightly higher than initially expected and increases with galactocentric distance; (iv) the total amount of dark gas closely follows the radially decreasing CO emission, as might be expected if the dark gas is H2 where CO is photodissociated. The total amount of H2, including dark gas, yields an average XCO of twice the galactic value of 2e20 cm^-2/(K km/s), 55% of this traced directly through CO. The rather constant fraction of dark gas suggests that there is no large population of diffuse H2 clouds (unrelated to GMCs) without CO emission. Unlike in large spirals, we detect no systematic radial trend in XCO, possibly linked to the absence of a radial decrease in CO line ratios.
  • Clouds have been shown to be present in many exoplanetary atmospheres. Cloud formation modeling predicts considerable inhomogeneities of cloud cover, consistent with optical phase curve observations. However, optical phase curves cannot resolve some existing degeneracies between cloud location and cloud optical properties. We present a conceptually simple technique to detect inhomogeneous cloud cover on exoplanets. Such an inhomogeneous cloud cover produces an asymmetric primary transit of the planet in front of the host star. Asymmetric transits produce characteristic residuals compared to a standard symmetric model. Furthermore, bisector spans can be used to determine asymmetries in the transit light curve. We apply a model of asymmetric transits to the light curves of HAT-P-7b, Kepler-7b and HD209458b and search for possible cloud signatures. The nearly uninterrupted Kepler photometry is particularly well-suited for this method since it allows for a very high time resolution. We do not find any statistically sound cloud signature in the data of the considered planets. For HAT-P-7b, a tentative detection of an asymmetric cloud cover is found, consistent with analysis of the optical phase curve. Based on Bayesian probability arguments, a symmetric model with an offset in the transit ephemeris remains, however, the most viable model. Still, this work demonstrates that for suitable targets, namely low-gravity planets around bright stars, the method can be used to constrain cloud cover characteristics and is thus a helpful additional tool to study exoplanetary atmospheres.
  • Basic atmospheric properties such as albedo and heat redistribution between day and nightside have been inferred for a number of planets using observations of secondary eclipses and thermal phase curves. Optical phase curves have not yet been used to constrain these atmospheric properties consistently. We re-model previously published phase curves of CoRoT-1b, TrES-2b and HAT-P-7b and infer albedos and recirculation efficiencies. These are then compared to previous estimates based on secondary eclipse data. We use a physically consistent model to construct optical phase curves. This model takes Lambertian reflection, thermal emission, ellipsoidal variations and Doppler boosting into account. CoRoT-1b shows a non-negligible scattering albedo (0.11<AS<0.3 at 95% confidence) as well as small day-night temperature contrasts, indicative of moderate to high re-distribution of energy between dayside and nightside. These values are contrary to previous secondary eclipse and phase curve analyses. In the case of HAT-P-7b, model results suggest relatively high scattering albedo (AS=0.3). This confirms previous phase curve analysis, however, it is in slight contradiction to values inferred from secondary eclipse data. For TrES-2b, both approaches yield very similar estimates of albedo and heat recirculation. Discrepancies between recirculation and albedo values as inferred from secondary eclipse and optical phase curve analyses might be interpreted as a hint that optical and IR observations probe different atmospheric layers, and hence temperatures.
  • To study the usefulness of \CFP\ as a tracer of the regions where C\p\ and \HH\ coexist in the interstellar medium. We used the Plateau de Bure Interferometer to synthesize \CFP\ J=1-0 absorption at 102.6 GHz toward the core of the distant HII region W49N at l = 43.2\degr, b=0.0\degr, and we modeled the fluorine chemistry in diffuse/translucent molecular gas. We detected \CFP\ absorption over a broad range of velocity showing that \CFP\ is widespread in the \HH-bearing Galactic disk gas. Originally detected in dense gas in the Orion Bar and Horsehead PDR, \CFP\ was subsequently detected in absorption from diffuse and translucent clouds seen toward \bll\ and 3C111. Here we showed that \CFP\ is distributed throughout the diffuse and translucent molecular disk gas with N(\CFP)/N(\HH) $= 1.5-2.0\times10^{-10}$, increasing to N(\CFP)/N(\HH) $= 3.5\times10^{-10}$ in one cloud at 39 \kms\ having higher N(\HH) $\approx 3\times10^{21}\pcc$. Models of the fluorine chemistry reproduce the observed column densities and relative abundance of HF, from which \CFP\ forms, but generally overpredict the the column density of \CFP\ by factors of 1.4-4. We show that a free space photodissociation rate $\Gamma \ga 10^{-9}\ps$, comparable to that of CH, might account for much of the discrepancy but a recent calculation finds a value about ten times smaller. In the heavily blended and kinematically complex spectra seen toward W49, \CFP\ absorption primarily traces the peaks of the \HH\ distribution.
  • Chemical models used to study the chemical composition of the gas and the ices in the interstellar medium are based on a network of chemical reactions and associated rate coefficients. These reactions and rate coefficients are partially compiled from data in the literature, when available. We present in this paper kida.uva.2014, a new updated version of the kida.uva public gas-phase network first released in 2012. In addition to a description of the many specific updates, we illustrate changes in the predicted abundances of molecules for cold dense cloud conditions as compared with the results of the previous version of our network, kida.uva.2011.
  • Small hydrocarbons, such as C2H, C3H and C3H2 are more abundant in photo-dissociation regions (PDRs) than expected based on gas-phase chemical models. To explore the hydrocarbon chemistry further, we observed a key intermediate species, the hydrocarbon ion l-C3H+, in the Horsehead PDR with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at high-angular resolution (6''). We compare with previous observations of C2H and c-C3H2 at similar angular resolution and new gas-phase chemical model predictions to constrain the dominant formation mechanisms of small hydrocarbons in low-UV flux PDRs. We find that, at the peak of the HCO emission (PDR position), the measured l-C3H+, C2H and c-C3H2 abundances are consistent with current gas-phase model predictions. However, in the first PDR layers, at the 7.7 mum PAH band emission peak, which are more exposed to the radiation field and where the density is lower, the C2H and c-C3H2 abundances are underestimated by an order of magnitude. At this position, the l-C3H+ abundance is also underpredicted by the model but only by a factor of a few. In addition, contrary to the model predictions, l-C3H+ peaks further out in the PDR than the other hydrocarbons, C2H and c-C3H2. This cannot be explained by an excitation effect. Current gas-phase photochemical models thus cannot explain the observed abundances of hydrocarbons, in particular in the first PDR layers. Our observations are consistent with a top-down hydrocarbon chemistry, in which large polyatomic molecules or small carbonaceous grains are photo-destroyed into smaller hydrocarbon molecules/precursors.
  • Recent observations have revealed the existence of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) in cold dense cores and prestellar cores. The presence of these molecules in such cold conditions is not well understood and remains a matter of debate since the previously proposed "warm- up" scenario cannot explain these observations. In this article, we study the effect of Eley- Rideal and complex induced reaction mechanisms of gas-phase carbon atoms with the main ice components of dust grains on the formation of COMs in cold and dense regions. Based on recent experiments we use a low value for the chemical desorption efficiency (which was previously invoked to explain the observed COM abundances). We show that our introduced mechanisms are efficient enough to produce a large amount of complex organic molecules in the gas-phase at temperatures as low as 10K.
  • In order to study the ISM and the interplay between the atomic and molecular components in a low-metallicity environment, we present a complete high angular and spectral resolution map and data cube of the 12CO(2-1) emission from the Local Group galaxy M33. Its metallicity is roughly half-solar, such that we can compare its ISM with that of the Milky Way with the main changes being the metallicity and the gas mass fraction. The data have a 12" angular resolution (50pc) with a spectral resolution of 2.6 km/s and a mean noise level of 20 mK per channel in antenna temperature. A radial cut along the major axis was also observed in the 12CO(1-0) line. The CO data cube and integrated intensity map are optimal when using HI data to define the baseline window and the velocities over which the CO emission is integrated. Great care was taken when building these maps, testing different windowing and baseline options and investigating the effect of error beam pickup. The total CO(2-1) luminosity is 2.8e7 K km/s pc2, following the spiral arms in the inner disk. There is no clear variation in the CO(2-1/1-0) intensity ratio with radius and the average value is roughly 0.8. The total molecular gas mass is estimated, using a N(H2)/Ico(1-0)=4e20 cm-2/(K km/s) conversion factor, to be 3.1e8 Msol. The CO spectra in the cube were shifted to zero velocity by subtracting the velocity of the HI peak from the CO spectra. Hence, the velocity dispersion between the atomic and molecular components is extremely low, independently justifying the use of the HI line in building our maps. Stacking the spectra in concentric rings shows that the CO linewidth and possibly the CO-HI velocity dispersion decrease in the outer disk. Using the CO(2-1) emission to trace the molecular gas, the probability distribution function of the H2 column density shows an excess at high column density above a log normal distribution.
  • Some runaway stars are known to display IR arc-like structures around them, resulting from their interaction with surrounding interstellar material. The properties of these features as well as the processes involved in their formation are still poorly understood. We aim at understanding the physical mechanisms that shapes the dust arc observed near the runaway O star AEAur (HD34078). We obtained and analyzed a high spatial resolution map of the CO(1-0) emission that is centered on HD34078, and that combines data from both the IRAM interferometer and 30m single-dish antenna. The line of sight towards HD34078 intersects the outer part of one of the detected globulettes, which accounts for both the properties of diffuse UV light observed in the field and the numerous molecular absorption lines detected in HD34078's spectra, including those from highly excited H2 . Their modeled distance from the star is compatible with the fact that they lie on the 3D paraboloid which fits the arc detected in the 24 {\mu}m Spitzer image. Four other compact CO globulettes are detected in the mapped area. These globulettes have a high density and linewidth, and are strongly pressure-confined or transient. The good spatial correlation between the CO globulettes and the IR arc suggests that they result from the interaction of the radiation and wind emitted by HD 34078 with the ambient gas. However, the details of this interaction remain unclear. A wind mass loss rate significantly larger than the value inferred from UV lines is favored by the large IR arc size, but does not easily explain the low velocity of the CO globulettes. The effect of radiation pressure on dust grains also meets several issues in explaining the observations. Further observational and theoretical work is needed to fully elucidate the processes shaping the gas and dust in bow shocks around runaway O stars. (Abridged)
  • Aims. We investigate the dominant formation mechanism of H2CO and CH3OH in the Horsehead PDR and its associated dense core. Methods. We performed deep integrations of several H2CO and CH3OH lines at two positions in the Horsehead, namely the PDR and dense core, with the IRAM-30m telescope. In addition, we observed one H2CO higher frequency line with the CSO telescope at both positions. We determine the H2CO and CH3OH column densities and abundances from the single-dish observations complemented with IRAM-PdBI high-angular resolution maps (6") of both species. We compare the observed abundances with PDR models including either pure gas-phase chemistry or both gas-phase and grain surface chemistry. Results. We derive CH3OH abundances relative to total number of hydrogen atoms of ~1.2e-10 and ~2.3e-10 in the PDR and dense core positions, respectively. These abundances are similar to the inferred H2CO abundance in both positions (~2e-10). We find an abundance ratio H2CO/CH3OH of ~2 in the PDR and ~1 in the dense core. Pure gas-phase models cannot reproduce the observed abundances of either H2CO or CH3OH at the PDR position. Both species are therefore formed on the surface of dust grains and are subsequently photodesorbed into the gas-phase at this position. At the dense core, on the other hand, photodesorption of ices is needed to explain the observed abundance of CH3OH, while a pure gas-phase model can reproduce the observed H2CO abundance. The high-resolution observations show that CH3OH is depleted onto grains at the dense core. CH3OH is thus present in an envelope around this position, while H2CO is present in both the envelope and the dense core itself. Conclusions. Photodesorption is an efficient mechanism to release complex molecules in low FUV-illuminated PDRs, where thermal desorption of ice mantles is ineffective.
  • We study the wavelength dependence of the dust emission as a function of position and environment across the disk of M33 at a linear resolution of 160 pc using Spitzer and Herschel photometric data. Expressing the emissivity of the dust as a power law, the power-law exponent (beta) is estimated from two independent approaches designed to properly treat the degeneracy between beta and the dust temperature. Both beta and the dust temperature are higher in the inner disk than in the outer disk, contrary to reported beta-T anti-correlations found in other sources. In the cold + warm dust model, the warm component and the ionized gas (Halpha) have a very similar distribution across the galaxy, demonstrating that the model separates the components in an appropriate fashion. The flocculent spiral arms and the dust lanes are evident in the map of the cold component. Both cold and warm dust column densities are high in star forming regions and reach their maxima toward the giant star forming complexes NGC604 and NGC595. beta declines from close to 2 in the center to about 1.3 in the outer disk. beta is positively correlated with star formation and with molecular gas column, as traced by Halpha and CO emission. The lower dust emissivity index in the outer parts of M33 is likely related to the reduced metallicity (different grain composition) and possibly different size distribution. It is not due to the decrease in stellar radiation field or temperature in a simple way because the FIR-bright regions in the outer disk also have a low beta. Like most spirals, M33 has a (decreasing) radial gradient in star formation and molecular-to-atomic gas ratio such that the regions bright in Halpha or CO tend to trace the inner disk, making it difficult to distinguish between their effects on the dust.
  • The aim of this paper is to provide a new set of branching ratios for interstellar and planetary chemical networks based on a semi empirical model. We applied, instead of zero order theory (i.e. only the most exoergic decaying channel is considered), a statistical microcanonical model based on the construction of breakdown curves and using experimental high velocity collision branching ratios for their parametriza- tion. We applied the model to ion-molecule, neutral-neutral, and ion-pair reactions implemented in the few popular databases for astrochemistry such as KIDA, OSU and UMIST. We studied the reactions of carbon and hydrocarbon species with electrons, He+, H+, CH+, CH, C, and C+ leading to intermediate complexes of the type Cn=2,10, Cn=2,4 H, C3 H2, C+n=2,10, Cn=2,4 H+, or C3 H+2 . Comparison of predictions with measurements supports the validity of the model. Huge deviations with respect to database values are often obtained. Effects of the new branching ratios in time dependant chemistry for dark clouds and for photodissociation region chemistry with conditions similar to those found in the Horsehead Nebula are discussed.
  • Complex (iso-)nitrile molecules, such as CH3CN and HC3N, are relatively easily detected in our Galaxy and in other galaxies. We constrain their chemistry through observations of two positions in the Horsehead edge: the photo-dissociation region (PDR) and the dense, cold, and UV-shielded core just behind it. We systematically searched for lines of CH3CN, HC3N, C3N, and some of their isomers in our sensitive unbiased line survey at 3, 2, and 1mm. We derived column densities and abundances through Bayesian analysis using a large velocity gradient radiative transfer model. We report the first clear detection of CH3NC at millimeter wavelength. We detected 17 lines of CH3CN at the PDR and 6 at the dense core position, and we resolved its hyperfine structure for 3 lines. We detected 4 lines of HC3N, and C3N is clearly detected at the PDR position. We computed new electron collisional rate coefficients for CH3CN, and we found that including electron excitation reduces the derived column density by 40% at the PDR position. While CH3CN is 30 times more abundant in the PDR than in the dense core, HC3N has similar abundance at both positions. The isomeric ratio CH3NC/CH3CN is 0.15+-0.02. In the case of CH3CN, pure gas phase chemistry cannot reproduce the amount of CH3CN observed in the UV-illuminated gas. We propose that CH3CN gas phase abundance is enhanced when ice mantles of grains are destroyed through photo-desorption or thermal-evaporation in PDRs, and through sputtering in shocks. (abridged)
  • We aim to better understand the emission of molecular tracers of the diffuse and dense gas in giant molecular clouds and the influence that metallicity, optical extinction, density, far-UV field, and star formation rate have on these tracers. Using the IRAM 30m telescope, we detected HCN, HCO+, 12CO, and 13CO in six GMCs along the major axis of M33 at a resolution of ~ 114pc and out to a radial distance of 3.4kpc. Optical, far-infrared, and submillimeter data from Herschel and other observatories complement these observations. To interpret the observed molecular line emission, we created two grids of models of photon-dominated regions, one for solar and one for M33-type subsolar metallicity. The observed HCO+/HCN line ratios range between 1.1 and 2.5. Similarly high ratios have been observed in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The HCN/CO ratio varies between 0.4% and 2.9% in the disk of M33. The 12CO/13CO line ratio varies between 9 and 15 similar to variations found in the diffuse gas and the centers of GMCs of the Milky Way. Stacking of all spectra allowed HNC and C2H to be detected. The resulting HCO+/HNC and HCN/HNC ratios of ~ 8 and 6, respectively, lie at the high end of ratios observed in a large set of (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies. HCN abundances are lower in the subsolar metallicity PDR models, while HCO+ abundances are enhanced. For HCN this effect is more pronounced at low optical extinctions. The observed HCO+/HCN and HCN/CO line ratios are naturally explained by subsolar PDR models of low optical extinctions between 4 and 10 mag and of moderate densities of n = 3x10^3 - 3x10^4 cm^-3, while the FUV field strength only has a small effect on the modeled line ratios. The line ratios are almost equally well reproduced by the solar-metallicity models, indicating that variations in metallicity only play a minor role in influencing these line ratios.
  • Within the framework of the Herschel M 33 extended survey HerM33es we study the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of a set of HII regions in M 33 as a function of the morphology. We present a catalogue of 119 HII regions morphologically classified: 9 filled, 47 mixed, 36 shell, and 27 clear shell HII regions. For each object we extract the photometry at twelve available wavelength bands (from FUV-1516A to IR-250mi) and obtain the SED. We also obtain emission line profiles across the regions to study the location of the stellar, ionised gas, and dust components. We find trends for the SEDs related to the morphology, showing that the star and gas-dust configuration affects the ratios of the emission in different bands. The mixed and filled regions show higher emission at 24mi than the shells and clear shells, which could be due to the proximity of the dust to the stellar clusters in the case of mixed and filled regions. The FIR peak for shells and clear shells seems to be located towards longer wavelengths, indicating that the dust is colder for this type of objects.The logarithmic 100/70mi ratio for filled and mixed regions remains constant over one order of magnitude in Halpha and FUV surface brightness, while the shells and clear shells exhibit a wider range of values of almost two orders of magnitude. We derive dust masses and temperatures fitting the individual SEDs with dust models proposed in the literature. The derived dust mass range is between 10^2-10^4 Msun and the cold dust temperature spans T(cold)~12-27 K. The spherical geometrical model proposed for the Halpha clear shells is confirmed by the emission profile obtained from the observations and is used to infer the electron density within the envelope: the typical electron density is 0.7+-0.3 cm^-3, while filled regions can reach values two to five times higher.
  • Context. CF+ has recently been detected in the Horsehead and Orion Bar photo-dissociation regions. The J=1-0 line in the Horsehead is double-peaked in contrast to other millimeter lines. The origin of this double-peak profile may be kinematic or spectroscopic. Aims. We investigate the effect of hyperfine interactions due to the fluorine nucleus in CF+ on the rotational transitions. Methods. We compute the fluorine spin rotation constant of CF+ using high-level quantum chemical methods and determine the relative positions and intensities of each hyperfine component. This information is used to fit the theoretical hyperfine components to the observed CF+ line profiles, thereby employing the hyperfine fitting method in GILDAS. Results. The fluorine spin rotation constant of CF+ is 229.2 kHz. This way, the double-peaked CF+ line profiles are well fitted by the hyperfine components predicted by the calculations. The unusually large hyperfine splitting of the CF+ line therefore explains the shape of the lines detected in the Horsehead nebula, without invoking intricate kinematics in the UV-illuminated gas.
  • The amount of H$_2$ present in spiral galaxies remains uncertain, particularly in the dim outer regions and in low-metallicity environments. We present high-resolution CO(1--0) observations with the Plateau de Bure interferometer of the most distant molecular cloud in the local group galaxy M 33. The cloud is a single entity rather than a set of smaller clouds within the broad beam of the original single-dish observations. The interferometer and single-dish fluxes are very similar and the line widths are indistinguishable, despite the difference in beamsize. At a spatial resolution of 10 pc, beyond the optical radius of the M 33, the CO brightness temperature reaches 2.4 Kelvins. A virial mass estimate for the cloud yields a mass of $4.3 \times 10^4$ \msun and a ratio $\ratio \simeq 3.5 \times 10^{20} \Xunit$. While no velocity gradient is seen where the emission is strong, the velocity is redshifted to the extreme SW and blue-shifted to the far NE. If the orientation of the cloud is along the plane of the disk (i.e. not perpendicular), then these velocities correspond to slow infall or accretion. The rather modest infall rate would be about $2 \times 10^{-4}$\moyr.
  • This work presents high spectral resolution observations of the \CII\ line at 158 \micron, one of the major cooling lines of the interstellar medium, taken with the HIFI heterodyne spectrometer on the Herschel satellite. In BCLMP 691, an \HII\ region far north (3.3 kpc) in the disk of M 33, the \CII\ and CO line profiles show similar velocities within $0.5 \kms$, while the \HI\ line velocities are systematically shifted towards lower rotation velocities by $\sim 5\kms$. Observed at the same $12"$ angular resolution, the \CII\ lines are broader than those of CO by about 50% but narrower than the \HI\ lines. The \CII\ line to far-infrared continuum ratio suggests a photoelectric heating efficiency of 1.1%. The data, together with published models indicate a UV field $G_0 \sim 100$ in units of the solar neighborhood value, a gas density $n_H \sim 1000 \cc$, and a gas temperature $T\sim 200$ K. Adopting these values, we estimate the C$^+$ column density to be $N_{C^+} \approx 1.3 \times 10^{17} \cmt$. The \CII\ emission comes predominantly from the warm neutral region between the \HII\ region and the cool molecular cloud behind it. From published abundances, the inferred C$^+$ column corresponds to a hydrogen column density of $N_H \sim 2 \times 10^{21} \cmt$. The CO observations suggest that $N_H = 2 N_{H_2} \sim 3.2 \times 10^{21} \cmt$ and 21cm measurements, also at $12"$ resolution, yield $N_\HI \approx 1.2 \times 10^{21} \cmt$ within the \CII\ velocity range. Thus, some H$_2$ not detected in CO must be present, in agreement with earlier findings based on the SPIRE 250 -- 500 $\mu$m emission.
  • C+ is a key species in the interstellar medium but its 158 {\mu}m fine structure line cannot be observed from ground-based telescopes. Current models of fluorine chemistry predict that CF+ is the second most important fluorine reservoir, in regions where C+ is abundant. We detected the J = 1-0 and J = 2-1 rotational lines of CF+ with high signal-to-noise ratio towards the PDR and dense core positions in the Horsehead. Using a rotational diagram analysis, we derive a column density of N(CF+) = (1.5 - 2.0) \times 10^12 cm^-2. Because of the simple fluorine chemistry, the CF+ column density is proportional to the fluorine abundance. We thus infer the fluorine gas-phase abundance to be F/H = (0.6 - 1.5) \times 10^-8. Photochemical models indicate that CF+ is found in the layers where C+ is abundant. The emission arises in the UV illuminated skin of the nebula, tracing the outermost cloud layers. Indeed, CF+ and C+ are the only species observed to date in the Horsehead with a double peaked line profile caused by kinematics. We therefore propose that CF+, which is detectable from the ground, can be used as a proxy of the C+ layers.
  • We study the far-infrared emission from the nearby spiral galaxy M33 in order to investigate the dust physical properties such as the temperature and the luminosity density across the galaxy. Taking advantage of the unique wavelength coverage (100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 micron) of the Herschel Space Observatory and complementing our dataset with Spitzer-IRAC 5.8 and 8 micron and Spitzer-MIPS 24 and 70 micron data, we construct temperature and luminosity density maps by fitting two modified blackbodies of a fixed emissivity index of 1.5. We find that the 'cool' dust grains are heated at temperatures between 11 and 28 K with the lowest temperatures found in the outskirts of the galaxy and the highest ones in the center and in the bright HII regions. The infrared/submillimeter total luminosity (5 - 1000 micron) is estimated to be 1.9x10^9 Lsun. 59% of the total luminosity of the galaxy is produced by the 'cool' dust grains (~15 K) while the rest 41% is produced by 'warm' dust grains (~55 K). The ratio of the cool-to-warm dust luminosity is close to unity (within the computed uncertainties), throughout the galaxy, with the luminosity of the cool dust being slightly enhanced in the center of the galaxy. Decomposing the emission of the dust into two components (one emitted by the diffuse disk of the galaxy and one emitted by the spiral arms) we find that the fraction of the emission in the disk in the mid-infrared (24 micron) is 21%, while it gradually rises up to 57% in the submillimeter (500 micron). We find that the bulk of the luminosity comes from the spiral arm network that produces 70% of the total luminosity of the galaxy with the rest coming from the diffuse dust disk. The 'cool' dust inside the disk is heated at a narrow range of temperatures between 18 and 15 K (going from the center to the outer parts of the galaxy).