• Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this article we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as ATI and HHG. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nano physics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the induced fields and the unique electron dynamics initiated by them with high temporal and spatial resolution.
  • We present theoretical predictions of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) resulting from the interaction of short femtosecond laser pulses with metal nanotips. It has been demonstrated that high energy electrons can be generated using nanotips as sources; furthermore the recollision mechanism has been proven to be the physical mechanism behind this photoemission. If recollision exists, it should be possible to convert the laser-gained energy by the electron in the continuum in a high energy photon. Consequently the emission of harmonic radiation appears to be viable, although it has not been experimentally demonstrated hitherto. We employ a quantum mechanical time dependent approach to model the electron dipole moment including both the laser experimental conditions and the bulk matter properties. The use of metal tips shall pave a new way of generating coherent XUV light with a femtosecond laser field.
  • We present a toolbox for cold atom manipulation with time-dependent magnetic fields generated by an atom chip. Wire layouts, detailed experimental procedures and results are presented for the following experiments: Use of a magnetic conveyor belt for positioning of cold atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates with a resolution of two nanometers; splitting of thermal clouds and BECs in adjustable magnetic double well potentials; controlled splitting of a cold reservoir. The devices that enable these manipulations can be combined with each other. We demonstrate this by combining reservoir splitter and conveyor belt to obtain a cold atom dispenser. We discuss the importance of these devices for quantum information processing, atom interferometry and Josephson junction physics on the chip. For all devices, absorption-image video sequences are provided to demonstrate their time-dependent behaviour.
  • We propose a configuration of a magnetic microtrap which can be used as an interferometer for three-dimensionally trapped atoms. The interferometer is realized via a dynamic splitting potential that transforms from a single well into two separate wells and back. The ports of the interferometer are neighboring vibrational states in the single well potential. We present a one-dimensional model of this interferometer and compute the probability of unwanted vibrational excitations for a realistic magnetic potential. We optimize the speed of the splitting process in order suppress these excitations and conclude that such interferometer device should be feasible with currently available microtrap technique.
  • Lithographically fabricated circuit patterns can provide magnetic guides and microtraps for cold neutral atoms. By combining several such structures on the same ceramic substrate, we have realized the first ``atom chips'' that permit complex manipulations of ultracold trapped atoms or de Broglie wavepackets. We show how to design magnetic potentials from simple conductor patterns and we describe an efficient trap loading procedure in detail. Applying the design guide, we describe some new microtrap potentials, including a trap which reaches the Lamb-Dicke regime for rubidium atoms in all three dimensions, and a rotatable Ioffe-Pritchard trap, which we also demonstrate experimentally. Finally, we demonstrate a device allowing independent linear positioning of two atomic clouds which are very tightly confined laterally. This device is well suited for the study of one-dimensional collisions.
  • We demonstrate an integrated magnetic ``atom chip'' which transports cold trapped atoms near a surface with very high positioning accuracy. Time-dependent currents in a lithographic conductor pattern create a moving chain of magnetic potential wells; atoms are transported in these wells while remaining confined in all three dimensions. We achieve fluxes up to 10^6 /s with a negligible heating rate. An extension of this ``atomic conveyor belt'' allows the merging of magnetically trapped atom clouds by unification of two Ioffe-Pritchard potentials. Under suitable conditions, the clouds merge without loss of phase space density. We demonstrate this unification process experimentally.