• Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering (Blois Workshop) - Moving Forward into the LHC Era
  • We discuss the prospects of searching for the neutral Higgs bosons of the triplet model in central exclusive production at the LHC. A detailed Monte Carlo analysis is presented for six benchmark scenarios for the Higgs boson, $H_1^{0}$, these cover $m_{H_1^0}=$~120, 150 GeV and doublet-triplet mixing of $c_H=$~0.2, 0.5 or 0.8. We find that, for appropriate values of $c_H$, an excellent Higgs mass measurement is possible for the neutral Higgs in the triplet model, and discuss how to distinguish the triplet model Higgs boson from the Higgs boson of the Standard Model.
  • We analyze the QCD dynamics of diffractive deep inelastic scattering. The presence of a rapidity gap between the target and diffractive system requires that the target remnant emerges in a color singlet state, which we show is made possible by the soft rescattering of the struck quark. This rescattering is described by the path-ordered exponential (Wilson line) in the expression for the parton distribution function of the target. The multiple scattering of the struck parton via instantaneous interactions in the target generates dominantly imaginary diffractive amplitudes, giving rise to an "effective pomeron" exchange. The pomeron is not an intrinsic part of the proton but a dynamical effect of the interaction. This picture also applies to diffraction in hadron-initiated processes. Due to the different color environment the rescattering is different in virtual photon- and hadron-induced processes, explaining the observed non-universality of diffractive parton distributions. This framework provides a theoretical basis for the phenomenologically successful Soft Color Interaction model which includes rescattering effects and thus generates a variety of final states with rapidity gaps. We discuss developments of the SCI model to account for the color coherence features of the underlying subprocesses.
  • We use techniques for lower bounds on communication to derive necessary conditions in terms of detector efficiency or amount of super-luminal communication for being able to reproduce with classical local hidden-variable theories the quantum correlations occurring in EPR-type experiments in the presence of noise. We apply our method to an example involving n parties sharing a GHZ-type state on which they carry out measurements and show that for local-hidden variable theories, the amount of super-luminal classical communication c and the detector efficiency eta are constrained by eta 2^(-c/n) = O(n^(-1/6)) even for constant general error probability epsilon = O(1).
  • The interaction region of hard exclusive hadron scattering can have a large transverse size due to endpoint contributions, where one parton carries most of the hadron momentum. The endpoint region is enhanced and can dominate in processes involving multiple scattering and quark helicity flip. The endpoint Fock states have perturbatively short lifetimes and scatter softly in the target. We give plausible arguments that endpoint contributions can explain the apparent absence of color transparency in fixed angle exclusive scattering and the dimensional scaling of transverse rho photoproduction at high momentum transfer, which requires quark helicity flip. We also present a quantitative estimate of Sudakov effects.
  • We present the results from the heavy quarks and quarkonia working group. This report gives benchmark heavy quark and quarkonium cross sections for $pp$ and $pA$ collisions at the LHC against which the $AA$ rates can be compared in the study of the quark-gluon plasma. We also provide an assessment of the theoretical uncertainties in these benchmarks. We then discuss some of the cold matter effects on quarkonia production, including nuclear absorption, scattering by produced hadrons, and energy loss in the medium. Hot matter effects that could reduce the observed quarkonium rates such as color screening and thermal activation are then discussed. Possible quarkonium enhancement through coalescence of uncorrelated heavy quarks and antiquarks is also described. Finally, we discuss the capabilities of the LHC detectors to measure heavy quarks and quarkonia as well as the Monte Carlo generators used in the data analysis.
  • Quarkonium data suggest an enhancement of the hadroproduction rate from interactions of the heavy quark pair with a comoving color field generated in the hard gg -> Q\bar{Q} subprocess. We review the motivations and principal consequences of this comover enhancement scenario (CES).
  • Charm and bottom production near threshold is sensitive to the multi-quark, gluonic, and hidden-color correlations of hadronic and nuclear wavefunctions in QCD since all of the target's constituents must act coherently within the small interaction volume of the heavy quark production subprocess. Although such multi-parton subprocess cross sections are suppressed by powers of $1/m^2_Q$, they have less phase-space suppression and can dominate the contributions of the leading-twist single-gluon subprocesses in the threshold regime. The small rates for open and hidden charm photoproduction at threshold call for a dedicated facility.
  • We define and study hard ``semi-exclusive'' processes of the form $A+B \to C + Y$ which are characterized by a large momentum transfer between the particles $A$ and $C$ and a large rapidity gap between the final state particle $C$ and the inclusive system $Y$. Such reactions are in effect generalizations of deep inelastic lepton scattering, providing novel currents which probe specific quark distributions of the target $B$ at fixed momentum fraction. We give explicit expressions for photo- and leptoproduction cross sections such as $\gamma p \to \pi Y$ in terms of parton distributions in the proton and the pion distribution amplitude. Semi-exclusive processes provide opportunities to study fundamental issues in QCD, including odderon exchange and color transparency, and suggest new ways to measure spin-dependent parton distributions.
  • The momentum distributions of partons in bound nucleons are known to depend significantly on the size of the nucleus. The Fourier transform of the momentum ($\xbj$) distribution measures the overlap between Fock components of the nucleon wave function which differ by a displacement of one parton along the light cone. The magnitude of the overlap thus determines the average range of mobility of the parton in the nucleon. By comparing the Fourier transforms of structure functions for several nuclei we study the dependence of quark mobility on nuclear size. We find a surprisingly small nuclear dependence ($<2\%$ for He, C and Ca) for displacements $t=z \lsim 2.5$ fm, after which a nuclear suppression due to shadowing sets in. The nuclear effects observed in momentum space for \mbox{$\xbj \lsim 0.4$} can be understood as a reflection of only the large distance shadowing in coordinate space.
  • Quarkonium production at a given large p_T is dominated by parton fragmentation: a parton which is produced with transverse momentum p_T/z fragments into a quarkonium state which carries a fraction z of the parton momentum. Since parton production cross sections fall steeply with p_T, high z fragmentation is favored. However, quantum number constraints may require the emission of gluons in the fragmentation process, and this softens the z dependence of the fragmentation function. We discuss the possibility that higher- order processes may enhance the large z part of fragmentation functions and thus contribute significantly to the quarkonium cross section. An explicit calculation of light quark fragmentation into eta_c shows that the higher-order process q -> q eta_c in fact dominates the lowest-order process q -> qg eta_c.
  • In the limit of heavy quark mass, the production cross section and polarization of quarkonia can be calculated in perturbative QCD. We study the $p_\perp$-averaged production of charmonium states in $\pi N$ collisions at fixed target energies. The data on the relative production rates of $\jp$ and $\chi_J$ is found to disagree with leading twist QCD. The polarization of the $\jp$ indicates that the discrepancy is not due to poorly known parton distributions nor to the size of higher order effects ($K$-factors). Rather, the disagreement suggests important higher twist corrections, as has been surmised earlier from the nuclear target $A$-dependence of the production cross section.
  • Measurements of the polarization of $\jp$ produced in pion-nucleus collisions are in disagreement with leading twist QCD prediction where $\jp$ is observed to have negligible polarization whereas theory predicts substantial polarization. We argue that this discrepancy cannot be due to poorly known structure functions nor the relative production rates of $\jp$ and $\chi_J$. The disagreement between theory and experiment suggests important higher twist corrections, as has earlier been surmised from the anomalous non-factorized nuclear $A$-dependence of the $\jp$ cross section.
  • We study the Drell-Yan process $\pi N \rightarrow \mu^+ \mu^- X$ at large $x_F$ using perturbative QCD. A higher-twist mechanism suggested by Berger and Brodsky is known to qualitatively explain the observed $x_F$ dependence of the muon angular distribution, but the predicted large $x_F$ behavior differs quantitatively from observations. We have repeated the model calculation taking into account the effects of nonasymptotic kinematics. At fixed-target energies we find important corrections which improve the agreement with data. The asymptotic result of Berger and Brodsky is recovered only at much higher energies. We discuss the generic reasons for the large corrections at high $x_F$. A proper understanding of the $x_F \to 1$ data would give important information on the pion distribution amplitude and exclusive form factor.