• The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) has been conducted over a five-year period at the CFHT with the MegaCam instrument, totaling 450 nights of observations. The Wide Synoptic Survey is one component of the CFHTLS, covering 155 square degrees in four patches of 23 to 65 square degrees through the whole MegaCam filter set (u*, g', r', i', z') down to i'$_{AB}$ = 24.5. With the motivation of searching for high-redshift quasars at redshifts above 6.5, we extend the multi-wavelength CFHTLS-Wide data in the Y-band down to magnitudes of $\sim$ 22.5 for point sources (5$\sigma$). We observed the four CFHTLS-Wide fields (except one quarter of the W3 field) in the Y-band with the WIRCam instrument at the CFHT. Each field was visited twice, at least three weeks apart. Each visit consisted of two dithered exposures. The images are reduced with the Elixir software used for the CFHTLS and modified to account for the properties of near-InfraRed (IR) data. Two series of image stacks are subsequently produced: four-image stacks for each WIRCam pointing, and one-square-degree tiles matched to the format of the CFHTLS data release. Photometric calibration is performed on stars by fitting stellar spectra to their CFHTLS photometric data and extrapolating their Y-band magnitudes. We measure a limiting magnitude of Y$_{AB} \simeq 22.4$ for point sources (5$\sigma$) in an aperture diameter of 0.93", over 130 square degrees. We produce a multi-wavelength catalogue combining the CFHTLS-Wide optical data with our CFHQSIR (Canada-France High-z quasar survey in the near-InfraRed) Y-band data. We derive the Y-band number counts and compare them to the VIDEO survey. We find that the addition of the CFHQSIR Y-band data to the CFHTLS optical data increases the accuracy of photometric redshifts and reduces the outlier rate from 13.8% to 8.8% in the redshift range 1.05 $\lesssim$ z $\lesssim$ 1.2.
  • In the last decade, astronomers have found a new type of supernova called `superluminous supernovae' (SLSNe) due to their high peak luminosity and long light-curves. These hydrogen-free explosions (SLSNe-I) can be seen to z~4 and therefore, offer the possibility of probing the distant Universe. We aim to investigate the possibility of detecting SLSNe-I using ESA's Euclid satellite, scheduled for launch in 2020. In particular, we study the Euclid Deep Survey (EDS) which will provide a unique combination of area, depth and cadence over the mission. We estimated the redshift distribution of Euclid SLSNe-I using the latest information on their rates and spectral energy distribution, as well as known Euclid instrument and survey parameters, including the cadence and depth of the EDS. We also applied a standardization method to the peak magnitudes to create a simulated Hubble diagram to explore possible cosmological constraints. We show that Euclid should detect approximately 140 high-quality SLSNe-I to z ~ 3.5 over the first five years of the mission (with an additional 70 if we lower our photometric classification criteria). This sample could revolutionize the study of SLSNe-I at z>1 and open up their use as probes of star-formation rates, galaxy populations, the interstellar and intergalactic medium. In addition, a sample of such SLSNe-I could improve constraints on a time-dependent dark energy equation-of-state, namely w(a), when combined with local SLSNe-I and the expected SN Ia sample from the Dark Energy Survey. We show that Euclid will observe hundreds of SLSNe-I for free. These luminous transients will be in the Euclid data-stream and we should prepare now to identify them as they offer a new probe of the high-redshift Universe for both astrophysics and cosmology.
  • We present the VISTA-CFHT Stripe 82 (VICS82) survey: a near-infrared (J+Ks) survey covering 150 square degrees of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) equatorial Stripe 82 to an average depth of J=21.9 AB mag and Ks=21.4 AB mag (80% completeness limits; 5-sigma point source depths are approximately 0.5 mag brighter). VICS82 contributes to the growing legacy of multi-wavelength data in the Stripe 82 footprint. The addition of near-infrared photometry to the existing SDSS Stripe 82 coadd ugriz photometry reduces the scatter in stellar mass estimates to delta log(M_stellar)~0.3 dex for galaxies with M_stellar>10^9M_sun at z~0.5, and offers improvement compared to optical-only estimates out to z~1, with stellar masses constrained within a factor of approximately 2.5. When combined with other multi-wavelength imaging of the Stripe, including moderate-to-deep ultraviolet (GALEX), optical and mid-infrared (Spitzer IRAC) coverage, as well as tens of thousands of spectroscopic redshifts, VICS82 gives access to approximately 0.5 Gpc^3 of comoving volume. Some of the main science drivers of VICS82 include (a) measuring the stellar mass function of L^star galaxies out to z~1; (b) detecting intermediate redshift quasars at 2<z<3.5; (c) measuring the stellar mass function and baryon census of clusters of galaxies, and (d) performing optical/near-infrared-cosmic microwave background lensing cross-correlation experiments linking stellar mass to large-scale dark matter structure. Here we define and describe the survey, highlight some early science results and present the first public data release, which includes an SDSS-matched catalogue as well as the calibrated pixel data itself.
  • Context: in large-scale spatial surveys, the Point Spread Function (PSF) varies across the instrument field of view (FOV). Local measurements of the PSFs are given by the isolated stars images. Yet, these estimates may not be directly usable for post-processings because of the observational noise and potentially the aliasing. Aims: given a set of aliased and noisy stars images from a telescope, we want to estimate well-resolved and noise-free PSFs at the observed stars positions, in particular, exploiting the spatial correlation of the PSFs across the FOV. Contributions: we introduce RCA (Resolved Components Analysis) which is a noise-robust dimension reduction and super-resolution method based on matrix factorization. We propose an original way of using the PSFs spatial correlation in the restoration process through sparsity. The introduced formalism can be applied to correlated data sets with respect to any euclidean parametric space. Results: we tested our method on simulated monochromatic PSFs of Euclid telescope (launch planned for 2020). The proposed method outperforms existing PSFs restoration and dimension reduction methods. We show that a coupled sparsity constraint on individual PSFs and their spatial distribution yields a significant improvement on both the restored PSFs shapes and the PSFs subspace identification, in presence of aliasing. Perspectives: RCA can be naturally extended to account for the wavelength dependency of the PSFs.
  • We present observations collected in the CFHTLS-VIPERS region in the ultraviolet (UV) with the GALEX satellite (far and near UV channels) and the near infrared with the CFHT/WIRCam camera ($K_s$-band) over an area of 22 and 27 deg$^2$, respectively. The depth of the photometry was optimized to measure the physical properties (e.g., SFR, stellar masses) of all the galaxies in the VIPERS spectroscopic survey. The large volume explored by VIPERS will enable a unique investigation of the relationship between the galaxy properties and their environment (density field and cosmic web) at high redshift (0.5 < z < 1.2). In this paper, we present the observations, the data reductions and the build-up of the multi-color catalogues. The CFHTLS-T0007 (gri-{\chi}^2) images are used as reference to detect and measure the $K_s$-band photometry, while the T0007 u-selected sources are used as priors to perform the GALEX photometry based on a dedicated software (EMphot). Our final sample reaches $NUV_{AB}$~25 (at 5{\sigma}) and $K_{AB}$~22 (at 3{\sigma}). The large spectroscopic sample (~51,000 spectroscopic redshifts) allows us to highlight the robustness of our star/galaxy separation, and the reliability of our photometric redshifts with a typical accuracy $\sigma_z \le$ 0.04 and a catastrophic failure rate {\eta} < 2% down to i~23. We present various tests on the $K_s$ band completeness and photometric redshift accuracy by comparing with existing, overlapping deep photometric catalogues. Finally, we discuss the BzK sample of passive and active galaxies at high redshift and the evolution of galaxy morphology in the (NUV-r) vs (r-K_s) diagram at low redshift (z < 0.25) thanks to the high image quality of the CFHTLS. The images, catalogues and photometric redshifts for 1.5 million sources (down to $NUV \le$ 25 or $K_s \le$ 22) are released and available at this URL: http://cesam.lam.fr/vipers-mls/
  • We investigate the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) and stellar mass density from redshift z=0.2 to z=1.5 of a $K_{AB}$<22-selected sample with highly reliable photometric redshifts and over an unprecedentedly large area. Our study is based on NIR observations carried out with WIRCam at CFHT over the footprint of the VIPERS spectroscopic survey and benefits from the high quality optical photometry from the CFHTLS and UV observations with the GALEX satellite. The accuracy of our photometric redshifts is $\sigma_z$ < 0.03 and 0.05 for the bright ($i_{AB}$<22.5) and faint ($i_{AB}$>22.5) samples, respectively. The SMF is measured with ~760,000 galaxies down to $K_s$=22 and over an effective area of ~22.4 deg$^2$, the latter of which drastically reduces the statistical uncertainties (i.e. Poissonian error & cosmic variance). We point out the importance of a careful control of the photometric calibration, whose impact becomes quickly dominant when statistical uncertainties are reduced, which will be a major issue for future generation of cosmological surveys with, e.g. EUCLID or LSST. By exploring the rest-frame (NUV-r) vs (r-$K_s$) color-color diagram separating star-forming and quiescent galaxies, (1) we find that the density of very massive log($M_*/ M_{\odot}$) > 11.5 galaxies is largely dominated by quiescent galaxies and increases by a factor 2 from z~1 to z~0.2, which allows for additional mass assembly via dry mergers, (2) we confirm a scenario where star formation activity is impeded above a stellar mass log($M^*_{SF} / M_{\odot}$) = 10.64$\pm$0.01, a value that is found to be very stable at 0.2 < z < 1.5, (3) we discuss the existence of a main quenching channel that is followed by massive star-forming galaxies, and finally (4) we characterise another quenching mechanism required to explain the clear excess of low-mass quiescent galaxies observed at low redshift.
  • We present the K-band luminosity-halo mass relation, $L_{K,500}-M_{500,WL}$, for a subsample of 20 of the 100 brightest clusters in the XXL Survey observed with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). For the first time, we have measured this relation via weak-lensing analysis down to $M_{500,WL} =3.5 \times 10^{13}\,M_\odot$. This allows us to investigate whether the slope of the $L_K-M$ relation is different for groups and clusters, as seen in other works. The clusters in our sample span a wide range in mass, $M_{500,WL} =0.35-12.10 \times 10^{14}\,M_\odot$, at $0<z<0.6$. The K-band luminosity scales as $\log_{10}(L_{K,500}/10^{12}L_\odot) \propto \beta log_{10}(M_{500,WL}/10^{14}M_\odot)$ with $\beta = 0.85^{+0.35}_{-0.27}$ and an intrinsic scatter of $\sigma_{lnL_K|M} =0.37^{+0.19}_{-0.17}$. Combining our sample with some clusters in the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS) present in the literature, we obtain a slope of $1.05^{+0.16}_{-0.14}$ and an intrinsic scatter of $0.14^{+0.09}_{-0.07}$. The flattening in the $L_K-M$ seen in previous works is not seen here and might be a result of a bias in the mass measurement due to assumptions on the dynamical state of the systems. We also study the richness-mass relation and find that group-sized halos have more galaxies per unit halo mass than massive clusters. However, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in low-mass systems contributes a greater fraction to the total cluster light than BCGs do in massive clusters; the luminosity gap between the two brightest galaxies is more prominent for group-sized halos. This result is a natural outcome of the hierarchical growth of structures, where massive galaxies form and gain mass within low-mass groups and are ultimately accreted into more massive clusters to become either part of the BCG or one of the brighter galaxies. [Abridged]
  • We investigate how galaxies in VIPERS (the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey) inhabit the cosmological density field by examining the correlations across the observable parameter space of galaxy properties and clustering strength. The high-dimensional analysis is made manageable by the use of group-finding and regression tools. We find that the major trends in galaxy properties can be explained by a single parameter related to stellar mass. After subtracting this trend, residual correlations remain between galaxy properties and the local environment pointing to complex formation dependencies. As a specific application of this work we build subsamples of galaxies with specific clustering properties for use in cosmological tests.
  • We present new constraints on the relationship between galaxies and their host dark matter halos, measured from the location of the peak of the stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR), up to the most massive galaxy clusters at redshift $z\sim0.8$ and over a volume of nearly 0.1~Gpc$^3$. We use a unique combination of deep observations in the CFHTLenS/VIPERS field from the near-UV to the near-IR, supplemented by $\sim60\,000$ secure spectroscopic redshifts, analysing galaxy clustering, galaxy-galaxy lensing and the stellar mass function. We interpret our measurements within the halo occupation distribution (HOD) framework, separating the contributions from central and satellite galaxies. We find that the SHMR for the central galaxies peaks at $M_{\rm h, peak} = 1.9^{+0.2}_{-0.1}\times10^{12} M_{\odot}$ with an amplitude of $0.025$, which decreases to $\sim0.001$ for massive halos ($M_{\rm h} > 10^{14} M_{\odot}$). Compared to central galaxies only, the total SHMR (including satellites) is boosted by a factor 10 in the high-mass regime (cluster-size halos), a result consistent with cluster analyses from the literature based on fully independent methods. After properly accounting for differences in modelling, we have compared our results with a large number of results from the literature up to $z=1$: we find good general agreement, independently of the method used, within the typical stellar-mass systematic errors at low to intermediate mass (${M}_{\star} < 10^{11} M_{\odot}$) and the statistical errors above. We have also compared our SHMR results to semi-analytic simulations and found that the SHMR is tilted compared to our measurements in such a way that they over- (under-) predict star formation efficiency in central (satellite) galaxies.
  • We present an analysis of the clustering of galaxies from z ~ 2 to the present day using the WIRCam Deep Survey (WIRDS). WIRDS combines deep near-infrared data with the deep optical data from the CFHTLS Deep fields, providing a photometric data-set over an effective area of 2.4 sq. deg., from which accurate photometric redshifts and stellar masses can be estimated. We use the data to calculate the angular correlation function for galaxy samples split by star-formation activity, stellar mass and redshift. We estimate the real-space clustering for each sample, determining clustering lengths and power-law slopes. For galaxies selected by constant mass, we find that the clustering scale shows no evolution up to z ~ 2. Splitting the galaxy sample by mass, we see that higher mass galaxies have larger clustering scales at all redshifts. We use our results to test the GALFORM semi-analytical galaxy formation model and find the two are consistent. We split the galaxy population into passive and star-forming populations and find that the passive galaxy population shows a significantly larger clustering scale at all redshifts than the star-forming population below masses of ~$10^{11}M_\odot/h$, showing that even at z ~ 2 passive galaxies exist in denser environments than the bulk of the star-forming galaxy population. For star-forming galaxies with stellar masses $>10^{11}M_\odot/h$, we find a clustering strength of ~8Mpc/h across all redshifts, comparable to the measurements for the passive population. Also, for star-forming galaxies we see that clustering strength increases for higher stellar mass systems, however there is little sign of a mass dependence in passive galaxies. Finally, we investigate the connection between galaxy stellar mass and dark matter halo mass, showing a clear correlation between the two in both the WIRDS data and the GALFORM predictions.
  • We estimate the galaxy stellar mass function and stellar mass density for star-forming and quiescent galaxies with 0.2<z<4. We construct a deep K<24 sample of 220000 galaxies selected using the UltraVISTA DR1 data release. Our analysis is based on precise 30-band photometric redshifts. By comparing these photometric redshifts with 10800 spectroscopic redshifts from the zCOSMOS bright and faint surveys, we find a precision of sigma(dz/(1+z))=0.008 at i<22.5 and sigma(dz/(1+zs))=0.03 at 1.5<z<4. We derive the stellar mass function and correct for the Eddington bias. We find a mass-dependent evolution of the global and star-forming populations. This mass-dependent evolution is a direct consequence of the star formation being quenched in galaxies more massive than M>10^10.7Msun. For the mass function of the quiescent galaxies, we do not find any significant evolution of the high-mass end at z<1; however we observe a clear flattening of the faint-end slope. From z~3 to z~1, the density of quiescent galaxies increases over the entire mass range. Their comoving stellar mass density increases by 1.6 dex between z~3 and z~1 and by less than 0.2dex at z<1. We infer the star formation history from the mass density evolution and we find an excellent agreement with instantaneous star formation rate measurements at z<1.5, while we find differences of 0.2dex at z>1.5 consistent with the expected uncertainties. We also develop a new method to infer the specific star formation rate from the mass function of star-forming galaxies. We find that the specific star formation rate of 10^10Msun galaxies increases continuously in the redshift range 1<z<4. Finally, we compare our results with a semi-analytical model and find that these models overestimate the density of low mass quiescent galaxies by an order of magnitude, while the density of low-mass star-forming galaxies is successfully reproduced.
  • We describe the construction and general features of VIPERS, the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey. This `Large Programme' has been using the ESO VLT with the aim of building a spectroscopic sample of ~100,000 galaxies with i_{AB}<22.5 and 0.5<z<1.5. The survey covers a total area of ~24 deg^2 within the CFHTLS-Wide W1 and W4 fields. VIPERS is designed to address a broad range of problems in large-scale structure and galaxy evolution, thanks to a unique combination of volume (~ 5 x 10^7 h^{-3} Mpc^3) and sampling rate (~ 40%), comparable to state-of-the-art surveys of the local Universe, together with extensive multi-band optical and near-infrared photometry. Here we present the survey design, the selection of the source catalogue and the development of the spectroscopic observations. We discuss in detail the overall selection function that results from the combination of the different constituents of the project. This includes the masks arising from the parent photometric sample and the spectroscopic instrumental footprint, together with the weights needed to account for the sampling and the success rates of the observations. Using the catalogue of 53,608 galaxy redshifts composing the forthcoming VIPERS Public Data Release 1 (PDR-1), we provide a first assessment of the quality of the spectroscopic data. Benefiting from the combination of size and detailed sampling of this dataset, we conclude by presenting a map showing in unprecedented detail the large-scale distribution of galaxies between 5 and 8 billion years ago. [abridged]
  • In this paper we describe the first data release of the UltraVISTA near-infrared imaging survey of the COSMOS field. We summarise the key goals and design of the survey and provide a detailed description of our data reduction techniques . We provide stacked, sky-subtracted images in $YJHK_{\rm s}$ and narrow-band filters constructed from data collected during the first year of UltraVISTA observations. Our stacked images reach $5\sigma$ $AB$ depths in an aperture of $2\arcsec$ diameter of $\sim 25$ in $Y$ and $\sim 24$ in $JHK_{\rm s}$ bands and all have sub-arcsecond seeing. To this $5\sigma$ limit, our $K_{\rm s}$ catalogue contains 216,268 sources. We carry out a series of quality assessment tests on our images and catalogues, comparing our stacks with existing catalogues. The $1\sigma$ astrometric RMS in both directions for stars selected with $17.0<K_{\rm s}\rm {(AB)} <19.5$ is $\sim 0.08\arcsec$ in comparison to the publicly-available COSMOS ACS catalogues. Our images are resampled to the same pixel scale and tangent point as the publicly available COSMOS data and so may be easily used to generate multi-colour catalogues using this data. All images and catalogues presented in this paper are publicly available through ESO's "phase 3" archiving and distribution system and from the UltraVISTA web site.
  • We present measurements of higher order clustering of galaxies from the latest release of the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) Wide. We construct a volume-limited sample of galaxies that contains more than one million galaxies in the redshift range 0.2<z<1 distributed over the four independent fields of the CFHTLS. We use a counts in cells technique to measure the variance <xi_2> and the hierarchical moments S_n = <xi_n>/<xi_2>^(n-1) (3<n<5) as a function of redshift and angular scale.The robustness of our measurements if thoroughly tested, and the field-to-field scatter is in very good agreement with analytical predictions. At small scales, corresponding to the highly non-linear regime, we find a suggestion that the hierarchical moments increase with redshift. At large scales, corresponding to the weakly non-linear regime, measurements are fully consistent with perturbation theory predictions for standard LambdaCDM cosmology with a simple linear bias.
  • Context. Brown dwarfs represent a sizable fraction of the stellar content of our Galaxy and populate the transition between the stellar and planetary mass regime. There is however no agreement on the processes responsible for their formation. Aims. We have conducted a large survey of the young, nearby cluster IC 348, to uncover its low-mass brown dwarf population and study the cluster properties in the substellar regime. Methods. Deep optical and near-IR images taken with MegaCam and WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) were used to select photometric candidate members. A spectroscopic follow-up of a large fraction of the candidates was conducted to assess their youth and membership. Results. We confirmed spectroscopically 16 new members of the IC 348 cluster, including 13 brown dwarfs, contributing significantly to the substellar census of the cluster, where only 30 brown dwarfs were previously known. Five of the new members have a L0 spectral type, the latest-type objects found to date in this cluster. At 3 Myr, evolutionary models estimate these brown dwarfs to have a mass of ~13 Jupiter masses. Combining the new members with previous census of the cluster, we constructed the IMF complete down to 13 Jupiter masses. Conclusions. The IMF of IC 348 is well fitted by a log-normal function, and we do not see evidence for variations of the mass function down to planetary masses when compared to other young clusters.
  • We searched for isolated planetary-mass T-dwarfs in the 3Myr old Serpens Core cluster. We performed a deep imaging survey of the central part of this cluster using the WIRCam camera at the CFHT. Observations were performed through the narrow-band CH4_off and CH4_on filters, to identify young T-dwarfs from their 1.6micr methane absorption bands, and the broad-band JHK filters, to better characterize the selected candidates. We complemented our WIRCam photometry with optical imaging data from MegaCam at CFHT and Suprime-Cam at the Subaru telescope and mid-IR flux measurements from the Spitzer c2d Legacy Survey. We report four faint T-dwarf candidates in the direction of the Serpens Core with CH4_on-CH4_off above 0.2 mag, estimated visual extinction in the range 1-9 mag and spectral type in the range T1-T5 based on their dereddened CH4_on-CH4_off colors. Comparisons with T-dwarf spectral models and optical to mid-IR color-color and color-magnitude diagrams, indicate that two of our candidates (ID1 and 2) are background contaminants (most likely heavily reddened low-redshift quasars). The properties of the other two candidates (ID3 and 4) are consistent with them being young members of the Serpens Core cluster, although our analysis can not be considered conclusive. In particular, ID3 may also be a foreground T-dwarf. It is detected by the Spitzer c2d survey but only flux upper limits are available above 5.8 microns and, hence, we can not assess the presence of a possible disk around this object. However, it presents some similarities with other young T-dwarf candidates (SOri70 in the Sigma Ori cluster and CFHTJ0344+3206 in the direction of IC348). If ID3 and 4 belong to Serpens, they would have a mass of a few Jupiter masses and would be amongst the youngest, lowest mass objects detected in a star-forming region so far.
  • We present a detailed investigation of the changing relationship between galaxies and the dark matter haloes they inhabit from z~1.2 to the present day. We do this by comparing precise galaxy clustering measurements over 133 deg2 of the "Wide" component of the CFHT Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) with predictions of an analytic HOD model where the number of galaxies in each halo depends only on the halo mass. Starting from a parent catalogue of ~ 3x10^6 galaxies at i'_AB < 22.5 we use accurate photometric redshifts calibrated using ~ 10^4 spectroscopic redshifts to create a series of type-selected volume-limited samples covering 0.2 < z < 1.2. Our principal result, based on clustering measurements in these samples, is a robust determination of the luminosity-to-halo mass ratio and its dependence on redshift and galaxy type. For the full sample, this reaches a peak at low redshifts of Mh,peak = 4.5x10^11 h^-1 M_sun and moves towards higher halo masses at higher redshifts. For redder galaxies the peak is at higher halo masses and does not evolve significantly over the entire redshift range of our survey. We also consider the evolution of bias, average halo mass and the fraction of satellites as a function of redshift and luminosity. Our observed growth of a factor of ~ 2 in satellite fraction between z~1 and z~0 is testament to the limited role that galaxy merging plays in galaxy evolution for ~ 10^12 h^-1 M_sun mass haloes at z<1. Qualitatively, our observations are consistent with a picture in which red galaxies in massive haloes have already accumulated most of their stellar mass by z~1 and subsequently undergo little evolution until the present day. The observed movement of the peak location for the full galaxy population is consistent with the bulk of star-formation activity migrating from higher mass haloes at high redshifts to lower mass haloes at lower redshifts.
  • We measure the real-space galaxy power spectrum on large scales at redshifts 0.5 to 1.2 using optical colour-selected samples from the CFHT Legacy Survey. With the redshift distributions measured with a preliminary ~14000 spectroscopic redshifts from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS), we deproject the angular distribution and directly estimate the three-dimensional power spectrum. We use a maximum likelihood estimator that is optimal for a Gaussian random field giving well-defined window functions and error estimates. This measurement presents an initial look at the large-scale structure field probed by the VIPERS survey. We measure the galaxy bias of the VIPERS-like sample to be b_g=1.38 +- 0.05 (sigma_8=0.8) on scales k<0.2h/mpc averaged over 0.5<z<1.2. We further investigate three photometric redshift slices, and marginalising over the bias factors while keeping other LCDM parameters fixed, we find the matter density Omega_m=0.30+-0.06.
  • R. Laureijs, J. Amiaux, S. Arduini, J.-L. Auguères, J. Brinchmann, R. Cole, M. Cropper, C. Dabin, L. Duvet, A. Ealet, B. Garilli, P. Gondoin, L. Guzzo, J. Hoar, H. Hoekstra, R. Holmes, T. Kitching, T. Maciaszek, Y. Mellier, F. Pasian, W. Percival, J. Rhodes, G. Saavedra Criado, M. Sauvage, R. Scaramella, L. Valenziano, S. Warren, R. Bender, F. Castander, A. Cimatti, O. Le Fèvre, H. Kurki-Suonio, M. Levi, P. Lilje, G. Meylan, R. Nichol, K. Pedersen, V. Popa, R. Rebolo Lopez, H.-W. Rix, H. Rottgering, W. Zeilinger, F. Grupp, P. Hudelot, R. Massey, M. Meneghetti, L. Miller, S. Paltani, S. Paulin-Henriksson, S. Pires, C. Saxton, T. Schrabback, G. Seidel, J. Walsh, N. Aghanim, L. Amendola, J. Bartlett, C. Baccigalupi, J.-P. Beaulieu, K. Benabed, J.-G. Cuby, D. Elbaz, P. Fosalba, G. Gavazzi, A. Helmi, I. Hook, M. Irwin, J.-P. Kneib, M. Kunz, F. Mannucci, L. Moscardini, C. Tao, R. Teyssier, J. Weller, G. Zamorani, M.R. Zapatero Osorio, O. Boulade, J. J. Foumond, A. Di Giorgio, P. Guttridge, A. James, M. Kemp, J. Martignac, A. Spencer, D. Walton, T. Blümchen, C. Bonoli, F. Bortoletto, C. Cerna, L. Corcione, C. Fabron, K. Jahnke, S. Ligori, F. Madrid, L. Martin, G. Morgante, T. Pamplona, E. Prieto, M. Riva, R. Toledo, M. Trifoglio, F. Zerbi, F. Abdalla, M. Douspis, C. Grenet, S. Borgani, R. Bouwens, F. Courbin, J.-M. Delouis, P. Dubath, A. Fontana, M. Frailis, A. Grazian, J. Koppenhöfer, O. Mansutti, M. Melchior, M. Mignoli, J. Mohr, C. Neissner, K. Noddle, M. Poncet, M. Scodeggio, S. Serrano, N. Shane, J.-L. Starck, C. Surace, A. Taylor, G. Verdoes-Kleijn, C. Vuerli, O. R. Williams, A. Zacchei, B. Altieri, I. Escudero Sanz, R. Kohley, T. Oosterbroek, P. Astier, D. Bacon, S. Bardelli, C. Baugh, F. Bellagamba, C. Benoist, D. Bianchi, A. Biviano, E. Branchini, C. Carbone, V. Cardone, D. Clements, S. Colombi, C. Conselice, G. Cresci, N. Deacon, J. Dunlop, C. Fedeli, F. Fontanot, P. Franzetti, C. Giocoli, J. Garcia-Bellido, J. Gow, A. Heavens, P. Hewett, C. Heymans, A. Holland, Z. Huang, O. Ilbert, B. Joachimi, E. Jennins, E. Kerins, A. Kiessling, D. Kirk, R. Kotak, O. Krause, O. Lahav, F. van Leeuwen, J. Lesgourgues, M. Lombardi, M. Magliocchetti, K. Maguire, E. Majerotto, R. Maoli, F. Marulli, S. Maurogordato, H. McCracken, R. McLure, A. Melchiorri, A. Merson, M. Moresco, M. Nonino, P. Norberg, J. Peacock, R. Pello, M. Penny, V. Pettorino, C. Di Porto, L. Pozzetti, C. Quercellini, M. Radovich, A. Rassat, N. Roche, S. Ronayette, E. Rossetti, B. Sartoris, P. Schneider, E. Semboloni, S. Serjeant, F. Simpson, C. Skordis, G. Smadja, S. Smartt, P. Spano, S. Spiro, M. Sullivan, A. Tilquin, R. Trotta, L. Verde, Y. Wang, G. Williger, G. Zhao, J. Zoubian, E. Zucca
    Oct. 14, 2011 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.GA
    Euclid is a space-based survey mission from the European Space Agency designed to understand the origin of the Universe's accelerating expansion. It will use cosmological probes to investigate the nature of dark energy, dark matter and gravity by tracking their observational signatures on the geometry of the universe and on the cosmic history of structure formation. The mission is optimised for two independent primary cosmological probes: Weak gravitational Lensing (WL) and Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). The Euclid payload consists of a 1.2 m Korsch telescope designed to provide a large field of view. It carries two instruments with a common field-of-view of ~0.54 deg2: the visual imager (VIS) and the near infrared instrument (NISP) which contains a slitless spectrometer and a three bands photometer. The Euclid wide survey will cover 15,000 deg2 of the extragalactic sky and is complemented by two 20 deg2 deep fields. For WL, Euclid measures the shapes of 30-40 resolved galaxies per arcmin2 in one broad visible R+I+Z band (550-920 nm). The photometric redshifts for these galaxies reach a precision of dz/(1+z) < 0.05. They are derived from three additional Euclid NIR bands (Y, J, H in the range 0.92-2.0 micron), complemented by ground based photometry in visible bands derived from public data or through engaged collaborations. The BAO are determined from a spectroscopic survey with a redshift accuracy dz/(1+z) =0.001. The slitless spectrometer, with spectral resolution ~250, predominantly detects Ha emission line galaxies. Euclid is a Medium Class mission of the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme, with a foreseen launch date in 2019. This report (also known as the Euclid Red Book) describes the outcome of the Phase A study.
  • We use CFHTLS deep optical data, WIRCam Deep Survey (WIRDS) NIR data and XMM data to identify z>1.1 clusters in the CFHTLS D1 and D4 fields. Counterparts to such clusters can not be identified without deep NIR data and as such the total of =1deg2 of J , H & Ks band imaging provided by WIRDS is an indispensable tool in such work. Using public XMM X-ray data, we identify extended X-ray sources in the two fields. The resulting catalogue of extended X-ray sources was analyzed for optical/NIR counterparts, using a red-sequence algorithm. Redshifts of candidate groups and clusters were estimated using the median photometric redshifts of detected counterparts and where available spectroscopic data. Additionally, we surveyed X-ray point sources for potential group systems at the limit of our detection range in the X-ray data. A catalogue of z > 1.1 cluster candidates in the two fields has been compiled and cluster masses, radii and temperatures have been estimated using the scaling relations. The catalogue consists of 15 z > 1.1 candidates. Three of the detections are previously published extended X-ray sources. Of note is JKSC 041 for which we identify possible structures at z = 0.8, z = 0.96, z = 1.13 and z = 1.49. We also make an independent detection of the massive cluster, XMMXCS J2215.9-1738. We use the z > 1.1 catalogue to compare the cluster number counts in these fields with models based on WMAP 7-year cosmology and find that the models slightly over-predict the observations, whilst at z>1.5 we do not detect any clusters. We note that cluster number counts at z > 1.1 are highly sensitive to the cosmological model, however a significant reduction in present statistical (due to available survey area) and systematic (due to cluster scaling relations) uncertainties is required in order to confidently constrain cosmological parameters using cluster number counts at high redshift.
  • We compute photometric redshifts based on the template-fitting method in the fourth public release of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. This unique multi-colour catalogue comprises u*,g',r',i',z' photometry in four deep fields of 1 deg2 each and 35 deg2 distributed over three Wide fields. Our photometric redshifts are calibrated with and compared to 16,983 high-quality spectroscopic redshifts from several surveys. We find a dispersion of 0.028 and an outlier rate of 3.5% in the Deep field at i'AB < 24 and a dispersion of 0.036 and an outlier rate of 2.8% in the Wide field at i'AB < 22.5. Beyond i'AB = 22.5 in the Wide field the number of outliers rises from 5% to 10% at i'AB<23 and i'AB<24 respectively. For the Wide sample, we find the systematic redshift bias keeps below 1% to i'AB < 22.5, whereas we find no significant bias in the Deep field. We investigated the effect of tile-to-tile photometric variations and demonstrate that the accuracy of our photometric redshifts is reduced by at most 21%. We separate stars from galaxies using both the size and colour information, reducing the contamination by stars in our catalogues from 50% to 8% at i'AB < 22.5 in fields with the highest stellar density while keeping a complete galaxy sample. Our CFHTLS T0004 photometric redshifts are distributed to the community. Our release include 592,891 (i'AB < 22.5) and 244,701 (i'AB < 24) reliable galaxy photometric redshifts in the Wide and Deep fields, respectively.
  • We present the CFHTLS-Archive-Research Survey (CARS). It is a virtual multi-colour survey based on public archive images from the CFHT-Legacy-Survey. Our main scientific interests in CARS are optical searches for galaxy clusters from low to high redshift and their subsequent study with photometric and weak-gravitational lensing techniques. As a first step of the project we present multi-colour catalogues from 37 sq. degrees of the CFHTLS-Wide component. Our aims are to create astrometrically and photometrically well calibrated co-added images. Second goal are five-band (u*, g', r', i', z') multi-band catalogues with an emphasis on reliable estimates for object colours. These are subsequently used for photometric redshift estimates. The article explains in detail data processing, multi-colour catalogue creation and photometric redshift estimation. Furthermore we apply a novel technique, based on studies of the angular galaxy cross-correlation function, to quantify the reliability of photo-z's. The accuracy of our high-confidence photo-z sample (10-15 galaxies per sq. arcmin) is estimated to $\sigma_{\Delta_z/(1+z)}\approx 0.04-0.05$ up to i'<24 with typically only 1-3% outliers. Interested users can obtain access to our data by request to the authors.
  • We present a reconstruction of the mass distribution of galaxy cluster Abell 1689 at z = 0.18 using detected strong lensing features from deep HST/ACS observations and extensive ground based spectroscopy. Earlier analyses have reported up to 32 multiply imaged systems in this cluster, of which only 3 were spectroscopically confirmed. In this work, we present a parametric strong lensing mass reconstruction using 24 multiply imaged systems with newly determined spectroscopic redshifts, which is a major step forward in building a robust mass model. In turn, the new spectroscopic data allows a more secure identification of multiply imaged systems. The resultant mass model enables us to reliably predict the redshifts of additional multiply imaged systems for which no spectra are currently available, and to use the location of these systems to further constrain the mass model. In particular, we have detected 5 strong galaxy-galaxy lensing systems just outside the Einstein ring region, further constraining the mass profile. Our strong lensing mass model is consistent with that inferred from our large scale weak lensing analysis derived using CFH12k wide field images. Thanks to a new method for reliably selecting a well defined background lensed galaxy population, we resolve the discrepancy found between the strong and weak lensing mass models reported in earlier work. [ABRIDGED]
  • Aims: We present a wide-field multi-color survey of a homogeneous sample of eleven clusters of galaxies for which we measure total masses and mass distributions from weak lensing. Methods: The eleven clusters in our sample are all X-ray luminous and span a narrow redshift range at z=0.21 +/- 0.04. The weak lensing analysis of the sample is based on ground-based wide-field imaging obtained with the CFH12k camera on CFHT. We use the methodology developed and applied previously on the massive cluster Abell 1689. A Bayesian method, implemented in the Im2shape software, is used to fit the shape parameters of the faint background galaxies and to correct for PSF smearing. With the present data, shear profiles are measured in all clusters out to at least 2 Mpc (more than 15arcmin from the center) with high confidence. The radial shear profiles are fitted with different parametric mass profiles and the virial mass M_200 is estimated for each cluster and then compared to other physical properties. Results: Scaling relations between mass and optical luminosity indicate an increase of the M/L ratio with luminosity and a L_X-M_200 relation scaling as L_X \propto M_200^(0.83 +/- 0.11) while the normalization of the M_200 \propto T_X^{3/2} relation is close to the one expected from hydrodynamical simulations of cluster formation as well as previous X-ray analyses. We suggest that the dispersion in the M_200-T_X and M_200-L_X relations reflects the different merging and dynamical histories for clusters of similar X-ray luminosities and intrinsic variations in their measured masses. Improved statistics of clusters over a wider mass range are required for a better control of the intrinsic scatter in scaling relations.