• We present the first demonstration of two-photon double ionization of neon using an intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse train (APT) in a photon energy regime where both direct and sequential mechanisms are allowed. For an APT generated through high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in argon we achieve a total pulse energy close to 1 $\mu$J, a central energy of 35 eV and a total bandwidth of $\sim30$ eV. The APT is focused by broadband optics in a neon gas target to an intensity of $3\cdot10^{12} $W$\cdot$cm$^{-2}$. By tuning the photon energy across the threshold for the sequential process the double ionization signal can be turned on and off, indicating that the two-photon double ionization predominantly occurs through a sequential process. The demonstrated performance opens up possibilities for future XUV-XUV pump-probe experiments with attosecond temporal resolution in a photon energy range where it is possible to unravel the dynamics behind direct vs. sequential double ionization and the associated electron correlation effects.
  • This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray Free-Electron Laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C8H5F) and dissociating, laseraligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C6H4Br2) molecules and discuss them in the larger context of photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules. We also show how the strong nanosecond laser pulse used for adiabatically laser-aligning the molecules influences the measured electron and ion spectra and angular distributions, and discuss how this may affect the outcome of future time-resolved photoelectron diffraction experiments.
  • We have investigated multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics of argon and xenon atoms using a new x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facility, SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser (SACLA) in Japan, and identified that highly charged Xe ions with the charge state up to +26 are produced predominantly via four-photon absorption as well as highly charged Ar ions with the charge state up to +10 are produced via two-photon absorption at a photon energy of 5.5 keV. The absolute fluence of the XFEL pulse, needed for comparison between theory and experiment, has been determined using two-photon processes in the argon atom with the help of benchmark ab initio calculations. Our experimental results, in combination with a newly developed theoretical model for heavy atoms, demonstrate the occurrence of multiphoton absorption involving deep inner shells.
  • Phase-shift differences and amplitude ratios of the outgoing $s$ and $d$ continuum wave packets generated by two-photon ionization of helium atoms are determined from the photoelectron angular distributions obtained using velocity map imaging. Helium atoms are ionized with ultrashort extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser pulses with a photon energy of 20.3, 21.3, 23.0, and 24.3 eV, produced by the SPring-8 Compact SASE Source test accelerator. The measured values of the phase-shift differences are distinct from scattering phase-shift differences when the photon energy is tuned to an excited level or Rydberg manifold. The difference stems from the competition between resonant and non-resonant paths in two-photon ionization by ultrashort pulses. Since the competition can be controlled in principle by the pulse shape, the present results illustrate a new way to tailor the continuum wave packet.
  • We present experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of photoionization time delays from the $3s$ and $3p$ shells in Ar in the photon energy range of 32-42 eV. The experimental measurements are performed by interferometry using attosecond pulse trains and the infrared laser used for their generation. The theoretical approach includes intershell correlation effects between the 3s and 3p shells within the framework of the random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE). The connection between single-photon ionization and the two-color two-photon ionization process used in the measurement is established using the recently developed asymptotic approximation for the complex transition amplitudes of laser-assisted photoionization. We compare and discuss the theoretical and experimental results especially in the region where strong intershell correlations in the 3s to kp channel lead to an induced "Cooper" minimum in the 3s ionization cross-section.
  • We study photoionization of argon atoms excited by attosecond pulses using an interferometric measurement technique. We measure the difference in time delays between electrons emitted from the $3s^2$ and from the $3p^6$ shell, at different excitation energies ranging from 32 to 42 eV. The determination of single photoemission time delays requires to take into account the measurement process, involving the interaction with a probing infrared field. This contribution can be estimated using an universal formula and is found to account for a substantial fraction of the measured delay.
  • We present an interferometric pump-probe technique for the characterization of attosecond electron wave packets (WPs) that uses a free WP as a reference to measure a bound WP. We demonstrate our method by exciting helium atoms using an attosecond pulse with a bandwidth centered near the ionization threshold, thus creating both a bound and a free WP simultaneously. After a variable delay, the bound WP is ionized by a few-cycle infrared laser precisely synchronized to the original attosecond pulse. By measuring the delay-dependent photoelectron spectrum we obtain an interferogram that contains both quantum beats as well as multi-path interference. Analysis of the interferogram allows us to determine the bound WP components with a spectral resolution much better than the inverse of the attosecond pulse duration.
  • We study experimentally the influence of the intensity of the infrared (IR) probe field on attosecond pulse train (APT) phase measurements performed with the RABITT method (Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating by Interference in Two-Photon Transitions). We find that if a strong IR field is applied, the attosecond pulses will appear to have lower-than-actual chirp rates. We also observe the onset of the streaking regime in the breakdown of the weak-field RABITT conditions. We perform a Fourier-analysis of harmonic and sideband continuum states and show that the mutual phase relation of the harmonics can be extracted from higher Fourier components.
  • The basic properties of atoms, molecules and solids are governed by electron dynamics which take place on extremely short time scales. To measure and control these dynamics therefore requires ultrafast sources of radiation combined with efficient detection techniques. The generation of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond (1 as = 10-18 s) pulses has, for the first time, made direct measurements of electron dynamics possible. Nevertheless, while various applications of attosecond pulses have been demonstrated experimentally, no one has yet captured or controlled the full three dimensional motion of an electron on an attosecond time scale. Here we demonstrate an attosecond quantum stroboscope capable of guiding and imaging electron motion on a sub-femtosecond (1 fs = 10-15 s) time scale. It is based on a sequence of identical attosecond pulses which are synchronized with a guiding laser field. The pulse to pulse separation in the train is tailored to exactly match an optical cycle of the laser field and the electron momentum distributions are detected with a velocity map imaging spectrometer (VMIS). This technique has enabled us to guide ionized electrons back to their parent ion and image the scattering event. We envision that coherent electron scattering from atoms, molecules and surfaces captured by the attosecond quantum stroboscope will complement more traditional scattering techniques since it provides high temporal as well as spatial resolution.
  • Attosecond pulses can be used to initiate and control electron dynamics on a sub-femtosecond time scale. The first step in this process occurs when an atom absorbs an ultraviolet photon leading to the formation of an attosecond electron wave packet (EWP). Until now, attosecond pulses have been used to create free EWPs in the continuum, where they quickly disperse. In this paper we use a train of attosecond pulses, synchronized to an infrared (IR) laser field, to create a series of EWPs that are below the ionization threshold in helium. We show that the ionization probability then becomes a function of the delay between the IR and attosecond fields. Calculations that reproduce the experimental results demonstrate that this ionization control results from interference between transiently bound EWPs created by different pulses in the train. In this way, we are able to observe, for the first time, wave packet interference in a strongly driven atomic system.