• We realize a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in ZnO by simply depositing pure aluminum on its surface in ultra-high vacuum, and characterize its electronic structure using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The aluminum oxidizes into alumina by creating oxygen vacancies that dope the bulk conduction band of ZnO and confine the electrons near its surface. The electron density of the 2DES is up to two orders of magnitude higher than those obtained in ZnO heterostructures. The 2DES shows two $s$-type subbands, that we compare to the $d$-like 2DESs in titanates, with clear signatures of many-body interactions that we analyze through a self-consistent extraction of the system self-energy and a modeling as a coupling of a 2D Fermi liquid with a Debye distribution of phonons.
  • In this paper we analyze in details the electronic properties of (Co/Ni) multilayers, a model system for spintronics devices. We use magneto-optical Kerr (MOKE), spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and anomalous surface diffraction experiments to investigate the electronic properties and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in [Co(x)/Ni(y)] single-crystalline stacks grown by molecular beam epitaxy.
  • We report the electronic band structures and concomitant Fermi surfaces for a family of exfoliable tetradymite compounds with the formula $T_2$$Ch_2$$Pn$, obtained as a modification to the well-known topological insulator binaries Bi$_2$(Se,Te)$_3$ by replacing one chalcogen ($Ch$) with a pnictogen ($Pn$) and Bi with the tetravalent transition metals $T$ $=$ Ti, Zr, or Hf. This imbalances the electron count and results in layered metals characterized by relatively high carrier mobilities and bulk two-dimensional Fermi surfaces whose topography is well-described by first principles calculations. Intriguingly, slab electronic structure calculations predict Dirac-like surface states. In contrast to Bi$_2$Se$_3$, where the surface Dirac bands are at the $\Gamma-$point, for (Zr,Hf)$_2$Te$_2$(P,As) there are Dirac cones of strong topological character around both the $\bar {\Gamma}$- and $\bar {M}$-points which are above and below the Fermi energy, respectively. For Ti$_2$Te$_2$P the surface state is predicted to exist only around the $\bar {M}$-point. In agreement with these predictions, the surface states that are located below the Fermi energy are observed by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements, revealing that they coexist with the bulk metallic state. Thus, this family of materials provides a foundation upon which to develop novel phenomena that exploit both the bulk and surface states (e.g., topological superconductivity).
  • One-dimensional (1D) electronic states were discovered on 1D surface atomic structure of Bi fabricated on semiconductor InSb(001) substrates by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The 1D state showed steep, Dirac-cone-like dispersion along the 1D atomic structure with a finite direct bandgap opening as large as 150 meV. Moreover, spin-resolved ARPES revealed the spin polarization of the 1D unoccupied states as well as that of the occupied states, the orientation of which inverted depending on the wave vector direction parallel to the 1D array on the surface. These results reveal that a spin-polarized quasi-1D carrier was realized on the surface of 1D Bi with highly efficient backscattering suppression, showing promise for use in future spintronic and energy-saving devices.
  • The crossover from Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superconductivity to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is difficult to realize in quantum materials because, unlike in ultracold atoms, one cannot tune the pairing interaction. We realize the BCS-BEC crossover in a nearly compensated semimetal Fe$_{1+y}$Se$_x$Te$_{1-x}$ by tuning the Fermi energy, $\epsilon_F$, via chemical doping, which permits us to systematically change $\Delta / \epsilon_F$ from 0.16 to 0.5 were $\Delta$ is the superconducting (SC) gap. We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure the Fermi energy, the SC gap and characteristic changes in the SC state electronic dispersion as the system evolves from a BCS to a BEC regime. Our results raise important questions about the crossover in multiband superconductors which go beyond those addressed in the context of cold atoms.
  • We study the effect of oxygen vacancies on the electronic structure of the model strongly correlated metal SrVO$_3$. By means of angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) synchrotron experiments, we investigate the systematic effect of the UV dose on the measured spectra. We observe the onset of a spurious dose-dependent prominent peak at an energy range were the lower Hubbard band has been previously reported in this compound, raising questions on its previous interpretation. By a careful analysis of the dose dependent effects we succeed in disentangling the contributions coming from the oxygen vacancy states and from the lower Hubbard band. We obtain the intrinsic ARPES spectrum for the zero-vacancy limit, where a clear signal of a lower Hubbard band remains. We support our study by means of state-of-the-art ab initio calculations that include correlation effects and the presence of oxygen vacancies. Our results underscore the relevance of potential spurious states affecting ARPES experiments in correlated metals, which are associated to the ubiquitous oxygen vacancies as extensively reported in the context of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the surface of insulating $d^0$ transition metal oxides.
  • The electronic states of Au-induced atomic nanowires on Ge(001) (Au/Ge(001) NWs) have been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with linearly polarized light. We have found three electron pockets around $\bar{J}\bar{K}$, where the Fermi surfaces are closed in a surface Brillouin zone, indicating that the surface states of Au/Ge(001) NWs are two-dimensional whereas the atomic structure is one-dimensional. The two-dimensional metallic states exhibit remarkable suppression of the photoelectron intensity near a Fermi energy. This suppression can be explained by the correlation and localization effects in disordered metals, which is a deviation from a Fermi-liquid model.
  • We present experimental results on the conversion of a spin current into a charge current by spin pumping into the Dirac cone with helical spin polarization of the elemental topological insulator (TI) {\alpha}-Sn[1-3]. By angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) we first confirm that the Dirac cone at the surface of {\alpha}-Sn (0 0 1) layers subsists after covering with Ag. Then we show that resonant spin pumping at room temperature from Fe through Ag into {\alpha}-Sn layers induces a lateral charge current that can be ascribed to the Inverse Edelstein Effect[4-5]. Our observation of an Inverse Edelstein Effect length[5-6] much longer than for Rashba interfaces[5-10] demonstrates the potential of the TI for conversion between spin and charge in spintronic devices. By comparing our results with data on the relaxation time of TI free surface states from time-resolved ARPES, we can anticipate the ultimate potential of TI for spin to charge conversion and the conditions to reach it.
  • We study with Angle Resolved PhotoElectron Spectroscopy (ARPES) the evolution of the electronic structure of Sr2IrO4, when holes or electrons are introduced, through Rh or La substitutions. At low dopings, the added carriers occupy the first available states, at bottom or top of the gap, revealing an anisotropic gap of 0.7eV in good agreement with STM measurements. At further doping, we observe a reduction of the gap and a transfer of spectral weight across the gap, although the quasiparticle weight remains very small. We discuss the origin of the in-gap spectral weight as a local distribution of gap values.
  • The Rashba effect is one of the most striking manifestations of spin-orbit coupling in solids, and provides a cornerstone for the burgeoning field of semiconductor spintronics. It is typically assumed to manifest as a momentum-dependent splitting of a single initially spin-degenerate band into two branches with opposite spin polarisation. Here, combining polarisation-dependent and resonant angle-resolved photoemission measurements with density-functional theory calculations, we show that the two "spin-split" branches of the model giant Rashba system BiTeI additionally develop disparate orbital textures, each of which is coupled to a distinct spin configuration. This necessitates a re-interpretation of spin splitting in Rashba-like systems, and opens new possibilities for controlling spin polarisation through the orbital sector.
  • We study the electronic structure of an ordered array of poly(para-phenylene) chains produced by surface-catalyzed dehalogenative polymerization of 1,4-dibromobenzene on copper (110). The quantization of unoccupied molecular states is measured as a function of oligomer length by scanning tunneling spectroscopy, with Fermi level crossings observed for chains longer than ten phenyl rings. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a graphene-like quasi one-dimensional valence band as well as a direct gap of 1.15 eV, as the conduction band is partially filled through adsorption on the surface. Tight-binding modelling and ab initio density functional theory calculations lead to a full description of the organic band-structure, including the k dispersion, the gap size and electron charge transfer mechanisms which drive the system into metallic behaviour. Therefore the entire band structure of a carbon-based conducting wire has been fully determined. This may be taken as a fingerprint of {\pi}-conjugation of surface organic frameworks.
  • We report the existence of metallic two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at the (001) and (101) surfaces of bulk-insulating TiO2 anatase due to local chemical doping by oxygen vacancies in the near-surface region. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we find that the electronic structure at both surfaces is composed of two occupied subbands of d_xy orbital character. While the Fermi surface observed at the (001) termination is isotropic, the 2DEG at the (101) termination is anisotropic and shows a charge carrier density three times larger than at the (001) surface. Moreover, we demonstrate that intense UV synchrotron radiation can alter the electronic structure and stoichiometry of the surface up to the complete disappearance of the 2DEG. These results open a route for the nano-engineering of confined electronic states, the control of their metallic or insulating nature, and the tailoring of their microscopic symmetry, using UV illumination at different surfaces of anatase.
  • We investigate the bismuth (111) surface by means of time and angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The parallel detection of the surface states below and above the Fermi level reveals a giant anisotropy of the Spin-Orbit (SO) spitting. These strong deviations from the Rashba-like coupling cannot be treated in $\textbf{k}\cdot \textbf{p}$ perturbation theory. Instead, first principle calculations could accurately reproduce the experimental dispersion of the electronic states. Our analysis shows that the giant anisotropy of the SO splitting is due to a large out-of plane buckling of the spin and orbital texture.
  • The research field of spintronics has sought, over the past 25 years and through several materials science tracks, a source of highly spin-polarized current at room temperature. Organic spinterfaces, which consist in an interface between a ferromagnetic metal and a molecule, represent the most promising track as demonstrated for a handful of interface candidates. How general is this effect? We deploy topographical and spectroscopic techniques to show that a strongly spin-polarized interface arises already between ferromagnetic cobalt and mere carbon atoms. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy show how a dense semiconducting carbon film with a low band gap of about 0.4 eV is formed atop the metallic interface. Spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy reveals a high degree of spin polarization at room temperature of carbon-induced interface states at the Fermi energy. From both our previous study of cobalt/phthalocyanine spinterfaces and present x-ray photoemission spectroscopy studies of the cobalt/carbon interface, we infer that these highly spin-polarized interface states arise mainly from sp2-bonded carbon atoms. We thus demonstrate the molecule-agnostic, generic nature of the spinterface formation.
  • We report the existence of confined electronic states at the (110) and (111) surfaces of SrTiO3. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we find that the corresponding Fermi surfaces, subband masses, and orbital ordering are different from the ones at the (001) surface of SrTiO3. This occurs because the crystallographic symmetries of the surface and sub-surface planes, and the electron effective masses along the confinement direction, influence the symmetry of the electronic structure and the orbital ordering of the t2g manifold. Remarkably, our analysis of the data also reveals that the carrier concentration and thickness are similar for all three surface orientations, despite their different polarities. The orientational tuning of the microscopic properties of two-dimensional electron states at the surface of SrTiO3 echoes the tailoring of macroscopic (e.g. transport) properties reported recently in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (110) and (111) interfaces, and is promising for searching new types of 2D electronic states in correlated-electron oxides.
  • We investigate with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy the change of the Fermi Surface (FS) and the main bands from the paramagnetic (PM) state to the antiferromagnetic (AFM) occurring below 72 K in Fe_{1.06}Te. The evolution is completely different from that observed in iron-pnictides as nesting is absent. The AFM state is a rather good metal, in agreement with our magnetic band structure calculation. On the other hand, the PM state is very anomalous with a large pseudogap on the electron pocket that closes in the AFM state. We discuss this behavior in connection with spin fluctuations existing above the magnetic transition and the correlations predicted in the spin-freezing regime of the incoherent metallic state.
  • We investigate the quasiperiodic crystal (LaS)1.196(VS2) by angle and time resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The dispersion of electronic states is in qualitative agreement with band structure calculated for the VS2 slab without the incommensurate distortion. Nonetheless, the spectra display a temperature dependent pseudogap instead of quasiparticles crossing. The sudden photoexcitation at 50 K induces a partial filling of the electronic pseudogap within less than 80 fs. The electronic energy flows into the lattice modes on a comparable timescale. We attribute this surprisingly short timescale to a very strong electron-phonon coupling to the incommensurate distortion. This result sheds light on the electronic localization arising in aperiodic structures and quasicrystals.
  • Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we study the evolution of the number of carriers in Ba(Fe(1-x)Cox)2As2 as a function of Co content and temperature. We show that there is a k-dependent energy shift compared to density functional calculations, which is large at low Co contents and low temperatures and reduces the volume of hole and electron pockets by a factor 2. This k-shift becomes negligible at high Co content and could be due to interband charge or spin fluctuations. We further reveal that the bands shift with temperature, changing significantly the number of carriers they contain (up to 50%). We explain this evolution by thermal excitations of carriers among the narrow bands, possibly combined with a temperature evolution of the k-dependent fluctuations.
  • ARPES is a priori a technique of choice to measure the Fermi velocities vF in metals. In correlated systems, it is interesting to compare this experimental value to that obtained in band structure calculations, as deviations are usually taken as a good indicator of the presence of strong electronic correlations. Nevertheless, it is not always straightforward to extract vF from ARPES spectra. We study here the case of layered cobaltates, an interesting family of correlated metals. We compare the results obtained by standard methods, namely the fit of spectra at constant momentum k (energy distribution curve, EDC) or constant binding energy omega(momentum distribution curve, MDC). We find that the difference of vF between the two methods can be as large as a factor 2. The reliability of the 2 methods is intimately linked to the degree of k- and omega-dependence of the electronic self-energy. As the k-dependence is usually much smaller than the omega dependence for a correlated system, the MDC analysis is generally expected to give more reliable results. However, we review here several examples within cobaltates, where the MDC analysis apparently leads to unphysical results, while the EDC analysis appears coherent. We attribute the difference between the EDC and MDC analysis to a strong variation of the photoemission intensity with the momentum k. This distorts the MDC lineshapes but does not affect the EDC ones. Simulations including a k dependence of the intensity allow to reproduce the difference between MDC and EDC analysis very well. This momentum dependence could be of extrinsic or intrinsic. We argue that the latter is the most likely and actually contains valuable information on the nature of the correlations that would be interesting to extract further.
  • A blueprint for producing scalable digital graphene electronics has remained elusive. Current methods to produce semiconducting-metallic graphene networks all suffer from either stringent lithographic demands that prevent reproducibility, process-induced disorder in the graphene, or scalability issues. Using angle resolved photoemission, we have discovered a unique one dimensional metallic-semiconducting-metallic junction made entirely from graphene, and produced without chemical functionalization or finite size patterning. The junction is produced by taking advantage of the inherent, atomically ordered, substrate-graphene interaction when it is grown on SiC, in this case when graphene is forced to grow over patterned SiC steps. This scalable bottomup approach allows us to produce a semiconducting graphene strip whose width is precisely defined within a few graphene lattice constants, a level of precision entirely outside modern lithographic limits. The architecture demonstrated in this work is so robust that variations in the average electronic band structure of thousands of these patterned ribbons have little variation over length scales tens of microns long. The semiconducting graphene has a topologically defined few nanometer wide region with an energy gap greater than 0.5 eV in an otherwise continuous metallic graphene sheet. This work demonstrates how the graphene-substrate interaction can be used as a powerful tool to scalably modify graphene's electronic structure and opens a new direction in graphene electronics research.
  • Despite many ARPES investigations of iron pnictides, the structure of the electron pockets is still poorly understood. By combining ARPES measurements in different experimental configurations, we clearly resolve their elliptic shape. Comparison with band calculation identify a deep electron band with the dxy orbital and a shallow electron band along the perpendicular ellipse axis with the dxz/dyz orbitals. We find that, for both electron and hole bands, the lifetimes associated with dxy are longer than for dxz/dyz. This suggests that the two types of orbitals play different roles in the electronic properties and that their relative weight is a key parameter to determine the ground state.
  • In all iron pnictides, the positions of the ligand alternatively above and below the Fe plane create 2 inequivalent Fe sites. This results in 10 Fe 3d bands in the electronic structure. However, they do not all have the same status for an ARPES experiment. There are interference effects between the 2 Fe that modulate strongly the intensity of the bands and that can even switch their parity. We give a simple description of these effects, notably showing that ARPES polarization selection rules in these systems cannot be applied by reference to a single Fe ion. We show that ARPES data for the electron pockets in Ba(Fe0.92Co0.08)2As2 are in excellent agreement with this model. We observe both the total suppression of some bands and the parity switching of some other bands. Once these effects are properly taken into account, the structure of the electron pockets, as measured by ARPES, becomes very clear and simple. By combining ARPES measurements in different experimental configurations, we clearly isolate each band forming one of the electron pockets. We identify a deep electron band along one ellipse axis with the dxy orbital and a shallow electron band along the perpendicular axis with the dxz/dyz orbitals, in good agreement with band structure calculations. We show that the electron pockets are warped as a function of kz as expected theoretically, but that they are much smaller than predicted by the calculation.
  • Gold intercalation between the buffer layer and a graphene monolayer of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) leads to the formation of quasi free standing small aggregates of clusters. Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy measurements reveal that these clusters preserve the linear dispersion of the graphene quasiparticles and surprisingly increase their Fermi velocity. They also strongly modify the band structure of graphene around the Van Hove singularities (VHs) by a strong extension without charge transfer. This result gives a new insight on the role of the intercalant in the renormalization of the bare electronic band structure of graphene usually observed in Graphite and Graphene Intercalation Compounds.
  • We present a detailed comparison of the electronic structure of BaFe2As2 in its paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases, through angle-resolved photoemission studies. Using different experimental geometries, we resolve the full elliptic shape of the electron pockets, including parts of dxy symmetry along its major axis that are usually missing. This allows us to define precisely how the hole and electron pockets are nested and how the different orbitals evolve at the transition. We conclude that the imperfect nesting between hole and electron pockets explains rather well the formation of gaps and residual metallic droplets in the AFM phase, provided the relative parity of the different bands is taken into account. Beyond this nesting picture, we observe shifts and splittings of numerous bands at the transition. We show that the splittings are surface sensitive and probably not a reliable signature of the magnetic order. On the other hand, the shifts indicate a significant redistribution of the orbital occupations at the transition, especially within the dxz/dyz system, which we discuss.
  • Graphene stacked in a Bernal configuration (60 degrees relative rotations between sheets) differs electronically from isolated graphene due to the broken symmetry introduced by interlayer bonds forming between only one of the two graphene unit cell atoms. A variety of experiments have shown that non-Bernal rotations restore this broken symmetry; consequently, these stacking varieties have been the subject of intensive theoretical interest. Most theories predict substantial changes in the band structure ranging from the development of a Van Hove singularity and an angle dependent electron localization that causes the Fermi velocity to go to zero as the relative rotation angle between sheets goes to zero. In this work we show by direct measurement that non-Bernal rotations preserve the graphene symmetry with only a small perturbation due to weak effective interlayer coupling. We detect neither a Van Hove singularity nor any significant change in the Fermi velocity. These results suggest significant problems in our current theoretical understanding of the origins of the band structure of this material.