• X-ray spectra of quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries containing neutron stars can be fit with atmosphere models to constrain the mass and the radius. Mass-radius constraints can be used to place limits on the equation of state of dense matter. We perform fits to the X-ray spectrum of a quiescent neutron star in the globular cluster M13, utilizing data from ROSAT, Chandra and XMM-Newton, and constrain the mass-radius relation. Assuming an atmosphere composed of hydrogen and a 1.4${\rm M}_{\odot}$ neutron star, we find the radius to be $R_{\rm NS}=12.2^{+1.5}_{-1.1}$ km, a significant improvement in precision over previous measurements. Incorporating an uncertainty on the distance to M13 relaxes the radius constraints slightly and we find $R_{\rm NS}=12.3^{+1.9}_{-1.7}$ km (for a 1.4${\rm M}_{\odot}$ neutron star with a hydrogen atmosphere), which is still an improvement in precision over previous measurements, some of which do not consider distance uncertainty. We also discuss how the composition of the atmosphere affects the derived radius, finding that a helium atmosphere implies a significantly larger radius.
  • We present 22 new (+3 confirmed) cataclysmic variables (CVs) in the non core-collapsed globular cluster 47 Tucanae (47 Tuc). The total number of CVs in the cluster is now 43, the largest sample in any globular cluster so far. For the identifications we used near-ultraviolet (NUV) and optical images from the Hubble Space Telescope, in combination with X-ray results from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This allowed us to build the deepest NUV CV luminosity function of the cluster to date. We found that the CVs in 47 Tuc are more concentrated towards the cluster center than the main sequence turnoff stars. We compared our results to the CV populations of the core-collapsed globular clusters NGC 6397 and NGC 6752. We found that 47 Tuc has fewer bright CVs per unit mass than those two other clusters. That suggests that dynamical interactions in core-collapsed clusters play a major role creating new CVs. In 47 Tuc, the CV population is probably dominated by primordial and old dynamically formed systems. We estimated that the CVs in 47 Tuc have total masses of approx. 1.4 M_sun. We also found that the X-ray luminosity function of the CVs in the three clusters is bimodal. Additionally, we discuss a possible double degenerate system and an intriguing/unclassified object. Finally, we present four systems that could be millisecond pulsar companions given their X-ray and NUV/optical colors. For one of them we present very strong evidence for being an ablated companion. The other three could be CO- or He-WDs.
  • We report the discovery of the likely white dwarf companions to radio millisecond pulsars 47 Tuc Q and 47 Tuc S in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. These blue stars were found in near-ultraviolet images from the Hubble Space Telescope for which we derived accurate absolute astrometry, and are located at positions consistent with the radio coordinates to within 0.016 arcsec (0.2sigma). We present near-ultraviolet and optical colours for the previously identified companion to millisecond pulsar 47 Tuc U, and we unambiguously confirm the tentative prior identifications of the optical counterparts to 47 Tuc T and 47 Tuc Y. For the latter, we present its radio-timing solution for the first time. We find that all five near-ultraviolet counterparts have U300-B390 colours that are consistent with He white dwarf cooling models for masses ~0.16-0.3 Msun and cooling ages within ~0.1-6 Gyr. The Ha-R625 colours of 47 Tuc U and 47 Tuc T indicate the presence of a strong Ha absorption line, as expected for white dwarfs with an H envelope.
  • Our 5 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of the globular cluster NGC 6652 detected 7 X-ray sources, 3 of which are previously unidentified. This cluster hosts a well-known bright low-mass X-ray binary, source A (or XB 1832-330). Source B shows unusual rapid flaring variability, with an average L_X(0.5-10 keV) ~2*10^{34} ergs/s, but with minutes-long flares up to L_X=9*10^{34} ergs/s. Its spectrum can be fit by an absorbed power-law of photon index Gamma~1.24, and hardens as the countrate decreases. This suggests that part or all of the variation might be due to obscuration by the rim of a highly inclined accretion disk. Sources C and D, with L_X ~10^{33} ergs/s, have soft and unusual spectra. Source C requires a very soft component, with a spectrum peaking at 0.5 keV, which might be the hot polar cap of a magnetically accreting polar cataclysmic variable. Source D shows a soft spectrum (fit by a power-law of photon index ~2.3) with marginal evidence for an emission line around 1 keV; its nature is unclear. The faint new sources E, F, and G have luminosities of 1-2*10^{32} ergs/s, if associated with the cluster (which is likely). E and F have relatively hard spectra (consistent with power-laws with photon index ~1.5). G lacks soft photons, suggesting absorption with N_H>10^{22} cm^{-2}.
  • We have identified a new transient luminous low-mass X-ray binary, NGC 6440 X-2, with Chandra/ACIS, RXTE/PCA, and Swift/XRT observations of the globular cluster NGC 6440. The discovery outburst (July 28-31, 2009) peaked at L_X~1.5*10^36 ergs/s, and lasted for <4 days above L_X=10^35 ergs/s. Four other outbursts (May 29-June 4, Aug. 29-Sept. 1, Oct. 1-3, and Oct. 28-31 2009) have been observed with RXTE/PCA (identifying millisecond pulsations, Altamirano et al. 2009a) and Swift/XRT (confirming a positional association with NGC 6440 X-2), with similar peak luminosities and decay times. Optical and infrared imaging did not detect a clear counterpart, with best limits of V>21, B>22 in quiescence from archival HST imaging, g'>22 during the August outburst from Gemini-South GMOS imaging, and J>~18.5$ and K>~17 during the July outburst from CTIO 4-m ISPI imaging. Archival Chandra X-ray images of the core do not detect the quiescent counterpart, and place a bolometric luminosity limit of L_{NS}< 6*10^31 ergs/s (one of the lowest measured) for a hydrogen atmosphere neutron star. A short Chandra observation 10 days into quiescence found two photons at NGC 6440 X-2's position, suggesting enhanced quiescent emission at L_X~6*10^31 ergs/s . NGC 6440 X-2 currently shows the shortest recurrence time (~31 days) of any known X-ray transient, although regular outbursts were not visible in the bulge scans before early 2009. Fast, low-luminosity transients like NGC 6440 X-2 may be easily missed by current X-ray monitoring.
  • We present results of a study of the central regions of NGC 6397 using Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys, focusing on a group of 24 faint blue stars that form a sequence parallel to, but brighter than, the more populated sequence of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs). Using F625W, F435W, and F658N filters with the Wide Field Channel we show that these stars, 18 of which are newly discovered, have magnitudes and colors consistent with those of helium-core white dwarfs (He WDs) with masses ~ 0.2-0.3 Msun. Their H-alpha--R625 colors indicate that they have strong H-alpha absorption lines, which distinguishes them from cataclysmic variables in the cluster. The radial distribution of the He WDs is significantly more concentrated to the cluster center than that of either the CO WDs or the turnoff stars and most closely resembles that of the cluster's blue stragglers. Binary companions are required to explain the implied dynamical masses. We show that the companions cannot be main-sequence stars and are most likely heavy CO WDs. The number and photometric masses of the observed He WDs can be understood if ~1-5% of the main-sequence stars within the half-mass radius of the cluster have white dwarf companions with orbital periods in the range ~1-20 days at the time they reach the turnoff. In contrast to the CO WD sequence, the He WD sequence comes to an end at R625 ~ 24.5, well above the magnitude limit of the observations. We explore the significance of this finding in the context of thick vs. thin hydrogen envelope models and compare our results to existing theoretical predictions. In addition, we find strong evidence that the vast majority of the CO WDs in NGC 6397 down to Teff ~ 10,000 K are of the DA class. Finally, we use the CO WD sequence to measure a distance to the cluster of 2.34 +- 0.13 kpc.
  • We observed the nearby, low-density globular cluster M71 (NGC 6838) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory to study its faint X-ray populations. Five X-ray sources were found inside the cluster core radius, including the known eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1953+1846A. The X-ray light curve of the source coincident with this MSP shows marginal evidence for periodicity at the binary period of 4.2 h. Its hard X-ray spectrum and luminosity resemble those of other eclipsing binary MSPs in 47 Tuc, suggesting a similar shock origin of the X-ray emission. A further 24 X-ray sources were found within the half-mass radius, reaching to a limiting luminosity of 1.5 10^30 erg/s (0.3-8 keV). From a radial distribution analysis, we find that 18+/-6 of these 29 sources are associated with M71, somewhat more than predicted, and that 11+/-6 are background sources, both galactic and extragalactic. M71 appears to have more X-ray sources between L_X=10^30--10^31 erg/s than expected by extrapolating from other studied clusters using either mass or collision frequency. We explore the spectra and variability of these sources, and describe the results of ground-based optical counterpart searches.
  • We report the determination of high-accuracy radial velocities for 299 members of the globular cluster M92 using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the WIYN telescope. We have concentrated on stars outside of the central region of the cluster, located up to 14'4 from the cluster center. Candidate members were selected for spectroscopy based on a photometric metallicity index determined from 3-band Washington photometry, also obtained with the WIYN telescope. The median error in the velocities is 0.35 km/s. We find the heliocentric radial velocity of the cluster to be -121.2 +/-0.3 km/s. We have used an improved Bayesian analysis to determine the velocity dispersion profile of M92. The most probable profile is a cored power-law with a scale radius of 2', velocity dispersion at 1' of 6.3km/s and outer power-law with slope -0.6. We have also reanalyzed the M15 radial velocities of Drukier et al. (1998) and find that a pure power-law with a 1' velocity dispersion of 8 km/s and slope -0.5, and the combination of a power-law with slope -0.4 and scale of 7.5 km/s inside 9' and a dispersion of 4 km/s outside, are equally likely. In both clusters there is evidence that the samples include escaping stars. We present results from a GRAPE-based N-body simulation of an isolated cluster that demonstrates this effect. We suggest additional tests to determine the relative importance of tidal heating and stellar ejection for establishing the velocity field in globular cluster halos.
  • We report our analysis of a Chandra X-ray observation of the rich globular cluster Terzan 5, in which we detect 50 sources to a limiting 1.0-6 keV X-ray luminosity of 3*10^{31} ergs/s within the half-mass radius of the cluster. Thirty-three of these have L_X>10^{32} ergs/s, the largest number yet seen in any globular cluster. In addition to the quiescent low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB, identified by Wijnands et al.), another 12 relatively soft sources may be quiescent LMXBs. We compare the X-ray colors of the harder sources in Terzan 5 to the Galactic Center sources studied by Muno and collaborators, and find the Galactic Center sources to have harder X-ray colors, indicating a possible difference in the populations. We cannot clearly identify a metallicity dependence in the production of low-luminosity X-ray binaries in Galactic globular clusters, but a metallicity dependence of the form suggested by Jordan et al. for extragalactic LMXBs is consistent with our data.
  • We have detected 300 X-ray sources within the half-mass radius (2.79') of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae in a deep (281 ks) Chandra exposure. We perform photometry and simple spectral fitting for our detected sources, and construct luminosity functions, X-ray color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. Eighty-seven X-ray sources show variability on timescales from hours to years. Thirty-one of the new X-ray sources are identified with chromospherically active binaries from the catalogs of Albrow et al. The radial distributions of detected sources imply roughly 70 are background sources of some kind. Most source spectra are well-fit by thermal plasma models, except for quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs, containing accreting neutron stars) and millisecond pulsars (MSPs). We identify three new candidate qLMXBs with relatively low X-ray luminosities. One of the brightest cataclysmic variables (CVs, X10) shows evidence (a 4.7 hour period pulsation and strong soft X-ray emission) for a magnetically dominated accretion flow as in AM Her systems. Most of the bright CVs require intrinsic N_H columns of order 10^{21} cm^-2, suggesting a possible DQ Her nature. A group of X-ray sources associated with bright (sub)giant stars also requires intrinsic absorption. By comparing the X-ray colors, luminosities, variability, and quality of spectral fits of the detected MSPs to those of unidentified sources, we estimate that a total of \~25-30 MSPs exist in 47 Tuc (<60 at 95% confidence), regardless of their radio beaming fraction. We estimate that the total number of neutron stars in 47 Tuc is of order 300, reducing the discrepancy between theoretical neutron star retention rates and observed neutron star populations in globular clusters. (Abstract truncated.)
  • Chandra observations of globular clusters provide insight into the formation, evolution, and X-ray emission mechanisms of X-ray binary populations. Our recent (2002) deep observations of 47 Tuc allow detailed study of its populations of quiescent LMXBs, CVs, MSPs, and active binaries (ABs). First results include the confirmation of a magnetic CV in a globular cluster, the identification of 31 additional chromospherically active binaries, and the identification of three additional likely quiescent LMXBs containing neutron stars. Comparison of the X-ray properties of the known MSPs in 47 Tuc with the properties of the sources of uncertain nature indicates that relatively few X-ray sources are MSPs, probably only ~30 and not more than 60. Considering the \~30 implied MSPs and 5 (candidate) quiescent LMXBs, and their canonical lifetimes of 10 and 1 Gyr respectively, the relative birthrates of MSPs and LMXBs in 47 Tuc are comparable.
  • Quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) containing neutron stars have been identified in several globular clusters using Chandra or XMM X-ray observations, using their soft thermal spectra. We report a complete census of the qLMXB population in these clusters, identifying three additional probable qLMXBs in NGC 6440. We conduct several analyses of the qLMXB population, and compare it with the harder, primarily CV, population of low-luminosity X-ray sources with 10^31<L_X<10^32.5 ergs/s. The radial distribution of our qLMXB sample suggests an average system mass of 1.5^{+0.3}_{-0.2} Msun, consistent with a neutron star and low-mass companion. Spectral analysis reveals that no globular cluster qLMXBs, other than the transient in NGC 6440, require an additional hard power-law component as often observed in field qLMXBs. We identify an empirical lower luminosity limit of 10^32 ergs/s among globular cluster qLMXBs. The bolometric luminosity range of qLMXBs implies (in the deep crustal heating model of Brown and collaborators) low time-averaged mass transfer rates, below the disk stability criterion. The X-ray luminosity functions of the CV populations alone in NGC 6397 and 47 Tuc are shown to differ. The distribution of qLMXBs among globular clusters is consistent with their dynamical formation by either tidal capture or exchange encounters, allowing us to estimate that seven times more qLMXBs than bright LMXBs reside in globular clusters. The distribution of harder sources (primarily CVs) has a weaker dependence upon density than that of the qLMXBs. Finally, we discuss possible effects of core collapse and globular cluster destruction upon X-ray source populations.
  • We report a Chandra ACIS-I observation of the dense globular cluster Terzan 5. The previously known transient low-mass x-ray binary (LMXB) EXO 1745-248 in the cluster entered a rare high state during our August 2000 observation, complicating the analysis. Nevertheless nine additional sources clearly associated with the cluster are also detected, ranging from L_X(0.5-2.5 keV)=5.6*10^{32} down to 8.6*10^{31} ergs/s. Their X-ray colors and luminosities, and spectral fitting, indicate that five of them are probably cataclysmic variables, and four are likely quiescent LMXBs containing neutron stars. We estimate the total number of sources between L_X(0.5-2.5 keV)=10^{32} and 10^{33} ergs/s as 11.4^{+4.7}_{-1.8} by the use of artificial point source tests, and note that the numbers of X-ray sources are similar to those detected in NGC 6440. The improved X-ray position allowed us to identify a plausible infrared counterpart to EXO 1745-248 on our 1998 Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS images. This blue star (F110W=18.48, F187W=17.30) lies within 0.2'' of the boresighted LMXB position. Simultaneous Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) spectra, combined with the Chandra spectrum, indicate that EXO 1745-248 is an ultracompact binary system, and show a strong broad 6.55 keV iron line and an 8 keV smeared reflection edge.
  • We present 236 new radial velocities of galaxies in the cluster A2256 measured with the WIYN Hydra multi-object spectrograph. Combined with the previous work of Fabricant, Kent, and Kurtz (1989), we have velocities for a total of 319 galaxies of which 277 are cluster members. In addition to the new radial velocities, we present a 3x3 image mosaic in the R band of the central 19'x19' region of A2256, from which we obtained photometry for 861 galaxies. These data provide strong evidence for a merger event between two groups. In addition, we present evidence for the presence of a third group, on the outer reaches of the system, that is just now beginning to merge with the system.
  • We present the results of a search for variability in and near the core of the metal-rich, obscured globular cluster Terzan 5, using NICMOS on HST. This extreme cluster has approximately solar metallicity and a central density that places it in the upper few percent of all clusters. It is estimated to have the highest interaction rate of any galactic globular cluster. The large extinction towards Terzan 5 and the severe stellar crowding near the cluster center present a substantial observational challenge. Using time series analysis we discovered two variable stars in this cluster. The first is a RRab Lyrae variable with a period of ~0.61 days, a longer period than that of field stars with similar high metallicities. This period is, however, shorter than the average periods of RR Lyraes found in the metal-rich globular clusters NGC 6441, NGC 6388 and 47 Tuc. The second variable is a blue star with a 7-hour period sinusoidal variation and a likely orbital period of 14 hours. This star is probably an eclipsing blue straggler, or (less likely) the infrared counterpart to the low mass X-ray binary known in Terzan 5. Due to the extreme crowding and overlapping Airy profile of the IR PSF, we fall short of our original goal of detecting CVs via Palpha emission and detecting variable infrared emission from the location of the binary MSP in Terzan 5.