• The AuScope geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry array consists of three new 12 m radio telescopes and a correlation facility in Australia. The telescopes at Hobart (Tasmania), Katherine (Northern Territory) and Yarragadee (Western Australia) are co-located with other space geodetic techniques including Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and gravity infrastructure, and in the case of Yarragadee, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) facilities. The correlation facility is based in Perth (Western Australia). This new facility will make significant contributions to improving the densification of the International Celestial Reference Frame in the Southern Hemisphere, and subsequently enhance the International Terrestrial Reference Frame through the ability to detect and mitigate systematic error. This, combined with the simultaneous densification of the GNSS network across Australia will enable the improved measurement of intraplate deformation across the Australian tectonic plate. In this paper we present a description of this new infrastructure and present some initial results, including telescope performance measurements and positions of the telescopes in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame. We show that this array is already capable of achieving centimetre precision over typical long-baselines and that network and reference source systematic effects must be further improved to reach the ambitious goals of VLBI2010.
  • We compare the noise in interferometric measurements of the Vela pulsar from ground- and space-based antennas with theoretical predictions. The noise depends on both the flux density and the interferometric phase of the source. Because the Vela pulsar is bright and scintillating, these comparisons extend into both the low and high signal-to-noise regimes. Furthermore, our diversity of baselines explores the full range of variation in interferometric phase. We find excellent agreement between theoretical expectations and our estimates of noise among samples within the characteristic scintillation scales. Namely, the noise is drawn from an elliptical Gaussian distribution in the complex plane, centered on the signal. The major axis, aligned with the signal phase, varies quadratically with the signal, while the minor axis, at quadrature, varies with the same linear coefficients. For weak signal, the noise approaches a circular Gaussian distribution. Both the variance and covariance of the noise are also affected by artifacts of digitization and correlation. In particular, we show that gating introduces correlations between nearby spectral channels.
  • We present measurements of the linear diameter of the emission region of the Vela pulsar at observing wavelength lambda=18 cm. We infer the diameter as a function of pulse phase from the distribution of visibility on the Mopra-Tidbinbilla baseline. As we demonstrate, in the presence of strong scintillation, finite size of the emission region produces a characteristic W-shaped signature in the projection of the visibility distribution onto the real axis. This modification involves heightened probability density near the mean amplitude, decreased probability to either side, and a return to the zero-size distribution beyond. We observe this signature with high statistical significance, as compared with the best-fitting zero-size model, in many regions of pulse phase. We find that the equivalent full width at half maximum of the pulsar's emission region decreases from more than 400 km early in the pulse to near zero at the peak of the pulse, and then increases again to approximately 800 km near the trailing edge. We discuss possible systematic effects, and compare our work with previous results.
  • We present the first VLBI maps of H2O maser emission (lambda 1.3cm) in the nucleus of the Circinus Galaxy, constructed from data obtained with the Australia Telescope Long Baseline Array. The maser emission traces a warped, edge-on accretion disk between radii of 0.11+/-0.02 and ~0.40 pc, as well as a wide-angle outflow that extends up to ~1 pc from the estimated disk center. The disk rotation is close to Keplerian (v varies as 1/sqrt(r)), the maximum detected rotation speed is 260 km/s, and the inferred central mass is 1.7+/-0.3 x 10^6 solar masses. The outflowing masers are irregularly distributed above and below the disk, with relative outflow velocities up to ~+/-160 km/s, projected along the line of sight. The flow probably originates closer than 0.1 pc to the central engine, possibly in an inward extension of the accretion disk, though there is only weak evidence of rotation in the outward moving material. We observe that the warp of the disk appears to collimate the outflow and to fix the extent of the ionization cone observed on larger angular scales. This study provides the first direct evidence (i.e., through imaging) of dusty, high-density, molecular material in a nuclear outflow <1 pc from the central engine of a Seyfert galaxy, as well as the first graphic evidence that warped accretion disks can channel outflows and illumination patterns in AGN. We speculate that the same arrangement, which in some ways obviates the need for a geometrically thick, dusty torus, may apply to other type-2 AGN.
  • The first VLBI images of water maser emission in the Circinus Galaxy AGN show both a warped, edge-on accretion disk and an outflow 0.1 to 1 pc from the central engine. The inferred central mass is 1.3 million suns, while the disk mass may be on the order of 0.1 million suns, based on a nearly Keplerian rotation curve. The bipolar, wide-angle outflow appears to contain ``bullets'' ejected from within <0.1 pc of the central mass. The positions of filaments and bullets observed in the AGN ionization cone on kpc-scales suggest that the disk channels the flow to a radius of about 0.4 pc, at which the flow appears to disrupt the disk.
  • We have measured a time delay of 26 (+4/-5) days and a magnification ratio of 1.52 +/- 0.05 in the strong radio gravitational lens PKS 1830-211. The observations were made over the 18 month period from 1997 January to 1998 July with the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 8.6 GHz, and have shown that the source started a large flux density outburst around 1997 June.
  • We show that in many methanol maser sources the masers are located in lines, with a velocity gradient along them which suggests that the masers are situated in edge-on circumstellar, or protoplanetary, disks. We present VLBI observations of the methanol maser source G309.92+0.48, in the 12.2 GHz transition, which confirm previous observations that the masers in this source lie along a line. We show that such sources are not only linear in space but, in many cases, also have a linear velocity gradient. We then model these and other data in both the 6.7 GHz and the 12.2 GHz transition from a number of star formation regions, and show that the observed spatial and velocity distribution of methanol masers, and the derived Keplerian masses, are consistent with a circumstellar disk rotating around an OB star. We consider this and other hypotheses, and conclude that about half of these methanol masers are probably located in edge-on circumstellar disks around young stars. This is of particular significance for studies of circumstellar disks because of the detailed velocity information available from the masers.
  • We use interstellar scattering of the Vela pulsar to determine the size of its emission region. From interferometric phase variations on short baselines, we find that radio-wave scattering broadens the source by 3.4+/-0.3 milliarcseconds along the major axis at position angle 81+/-3 degrees. The ratio of minor axis to major axis is 0.51+/-0.03. Comparison of angular and temporal broadening indicates that the scattering material lies in the Vela-X supernova remnant surrounding the pulsar. From the modulation of the pulsar's scintillation on very short baselines, we infer a size of 500 km for the pulsar's emission region. We suggest that radio-wave refraction within the pulsar's magnetosphere may plausibly explain this size.