• We investigate the potential of using cosmic voids as a probe to constrain cosmological parameters through the gravitational lensing effect of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and make predictions for the next generation surveys. By assuming the detection of a series of $\approx 5 - 10$ voids along a line of sight within a square-degree patch of the sky, we found that they can be used to break the degeneracy direction of some of the cosmological parameter constraints (for example $\omega_b$ and $\Omega_\Lambda$) in comparison with the constraints from random CMB skies with the same size area for a survey with extensive integration time. This analysis is based on our current knowledge of the average void profile and analytical estimates of the void number function. We also provide combined cosmological parameter constraints between a sky patch where series of voids are detected and a patch without voids (a randomly selected patch). The full potential of this technique relies on an accurate determination of the void profile to $\approx 10$% level. For a small-area CMB observation with extensive integration time and a high signal-to-noise ratio, CMB lensing with such series of voids will provide a complementary route to cosmological parameter constraints to the CMB observations. Example of parameter constraints with a series of five voids on a $1.0^{\circ} \times 1.0^{\circ}$ patch of the sky are $100\omega_b = 2.20 \pm 0.27$, $\omega_c = 0.120 \pm 0.022$, $\Omega_\Lambda = 0.682 \pm 0.078$, $\Delta_{\mathcal{R}}^2 = \left(2.22 \pm 7.79\right) \times 10^{-9}$, $n_s = 0.962 \pm 0.097$ and $\tau = 0.925 \pm 1.747$ at 68% C.L.
  • Cosmic voids in the large-scale structure of the Universe affect the peculiar motions of objects in their vicinity. Although these motions are difficult to observe directly, the clustering pattern of their surrounding tracers in redshift space is influenced in a unique way. This allows to investigate the interplay between densities and velocities around voids, which is solely dictated by the laws of gravity. With the help of $N$-body simulations and derived mock-galaxy catalogs we calculate the average density fluctuations around voids identified with a watershed algorithm in redshift space and compare the results with the expectation from general relativity and the $\Lambda$CDM model. We find linear theory to work remarkably well in describing the dynamics of voids. Adopting a Bayesian inference framework, we explore the full posterior of our model parameters and forecast the achievable accuracy on measurements of the growth rate of structure and the geometric distortion through the Alcock-Paczynski effect. Systematic errors in the latter are reduced from $\sim15\%$ to $\sim5\%$ when peculiar velocities are taken into account. The relative parameter uncertainties in galaxy surveys with number densities comparable to the SDSS MAIN (CMASS) sample probing a volume of $1h^{-3}{\rm Gpc}^3$ yield $\sigma_{f/b}\left/(f/b)\right.\sim2\%$ ($20\%$) and $\sigma_{D_AH}/D_AH\sim0.2\%$ ($2\%$), respectively. At this level of precision the linear-theory model becomes systematics dominated, with parameter biases that fall beyond these values. Nevertheless, the presented method is highly model independent; its viability lies in the underlying assumption of statistical isotropy of the Universe.
  • We show that the number of observed voids in galaxy redshift surveys is a sensitive function of the equation of state of dark energy. Using the Fisher matrix formalism we find the error ellipses in the $w_0-w_a$ plane when the equation of state of dark energy is assumed to be of the form $w_{CPL}(z)=w_0 +w_a z/(1+z)$. We forecast the number of voids to be observed with the ESA Euclid satellite and the NASA WFIRST mission, taking into account updated details of the surveys to reach accurate estimates of their power. The theoretical model for the forecast of the number of voids is based on matches between abundances in simulations and the analytical prediction. To take into account the uncertainties within the model, we marginalize over its free parameters when calculating the Fisher matrices. The addition of the void abundance constraints to the data from Planck, HST and supernova survey data noticeably tighten the $w_0-w_a$ parameter space. We thus quantify the improvement in the constraints due to the use of voids and demonstrate that the void abundance is a sensitive new probe for the dark energy equation of state.
  • Cosmic voids are a promising environment to characterize neutrino-induced effects on the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe. We perform a comprehensive numerical study of the statistical properties of voids, identified both in the matter and galaxy distributions, in massive and massless neutrino cosmologies. The matter density field is obtained by running several independent $N$-body simulations with cold dark matter and neutrino particles, while the galaxy catalogs are modeled by populating the dark matter halos in simulations via a halo occupation distribution (HOD) model to reproduce the clustering properties observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II Data Release 7. We focus on the impact of massive neutrinos on the following void statistical properties: number density, ellipticities, two-point statistics, density and velocity profiles. Considering the matter density field, we find that voids in massive neutrino cosmologies are less evolved than those in the corresponding massless neutrinos case: there is a larger number of small voids and a smaller number of large ones, their profiles are less evacuated, and they present a lower wall at the edge. Moreover, the degeneracy between $\sigma_8$ and $\Omega_{\nu}$ is broken when looking at void properties. In terms of the galaxy density field, we find that differences among cosmologies are difficult to detect because of the small number of galaxy voids in the simulations. Differences are instead present when looking at the matter density and velocity profiles around these voids.
  • How do peculiar velocities affect observed voids? To answer this question we use the VIDE toolkit to identify voids in mock galaxy populations embedded within an N-body simulation both with and without peculiar velocities included. We compare the resulting void populations to assess the impact on void properties. We find that void abundances and spherically-averaged radial density profiles are mildly affected by peculiar velocities. However, peculiar velocities can distort by up to 10% the shapes for a particular subset of voids depending on the void size and density contrast, which can lead to increased variance in Alcock-Paczy\'nski test. We offer guidelines for performing optimal cuts on the void catalogue to reduce this variance by removing the most severely affected voids while preserving the unaffected ones. In addition, since this shape distortion is largely limited to the line of sight, we show that the void radii are only affected at the $\sim$ 10% level and the macrocenter positions at the $\sim$ 20% (even before performing cuts), meaning that cosmological probes based on the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe and gravitational lensing are not severely impacted by peculiar velocities.
  • We present a general method for accelerating by more than an order of magnitude the convolution of pixelated functions on the sphere with a radially-symmetric kernel. Our method splits the kernel into a compact real-space component and a compact spherical harmonic space component. These components can then be convolved in parallel using an inexpensive commodity GPU and a CPU. We provide models for the computational cost of both real-space and Fourier space convolutions and an estimate for the approximation error. Using these models we can determine the optimum split that minimizes the wall clock time for the convolution while satisfying the desired error bounds. We apply this technique to the problem of simulating a cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy sky map at the resolution typical of the high resolution maps produced by the Planck mission. For the main Planck CMB science channels we achieve a speedup of over a factor of ten, assuming an acceptable fractional rms error of order 1.e-5 in the power spectrum of the output map.
  • We propose a novel technique to probe the expansion history of the Universe based on the clustering statistics of cosmic voids. In particular, we compute their two-point statistics in redshift space on the basis of realistic mock galaxy catalogs and apply the Alcock-Paczynski test. In contrast to galaxies, we find void auto-correlations to be marginally affected by peculiar motions, providing a model-independent measure of cosmological parameters without systematics from redshift-space distortions. Because only galaxy-galaxy and void-galaxy correlations have been considered in these types of studies before, the presented method improves both statistical and systematic uncertainties on the product of angular diameter distance and Hubble rate, furnishing the potentially cleanest probe of cosmic geometry available to date.
  • We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as "VHE-like" sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4 sigma level. There is also a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7 sigma). A correlation between 10-500 GeV flux and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4 sigma and 2.6 sigma, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity tau(E,z) ~5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.
  • We present VIDE, the Void IDentification and Examination toolkit, an open-source Python/C++ code for finding cosmic voids in galaxy redshift surveys and N-body simulations, characterizing their properties, and providing a platform for more detailed analysis. At its core, VIDE uses a substantially enhanced version of ZOBOV (Neyinck 2008) to calculate a Voronoi tessellation for estimating the density field and a performing a watershed transform to construct voids. Additionally, VIDE provides significant functionality for both pre- and post-processing: for example, vide can work with volume- or magnitude-limited galaxy samples with arbitrary survey geometries, or dark matter particles or halo catalogs in a variety of common formats. It can also randomly subsample inputs and includes a Halo Occupation Distribution model for constructing mock galaxy populations. VIDE uses the watershed levels to place voids in a hierarchical tree, outputs a summary of void properties in plain ASCII, and provides a Python API to perform many analysis tasks, such as loading and manipulating void catalogs and particle members, filtering, plotting, computing clustering statistics, stacking, comparing catalogs, and fitting density profiles. While centered around ZOBOV, the toolkit is designed to be as modular as possible and accommodate other void finders. VIDE has been in development for several years and has already been used to produce a wealth of results, which we summarize in this work to highlight the capabilities of the toolkit. VIDE is publicly available at http://bitbucket.org/cosmicvoids/vide public and http://www.cosmicvoids.net.
  • Taking N-body simulations with volumes and particle densities tuned to match the SDSS DR7 spectroscopic main sample, we assess the ability of current void catalogs (e.g., Sutter et al. 2012b) to distinguish a model of coupled dark matter-dark energy from {\Lambda}CDM cosmology using properties of cosmic voids. Identifying voids with the VIDE toolkit, we find no statistically significant differences in the ellipticities, but find that coupling produces a population of significantly larger voids, possibly explaining the recent result of Tavasoli et al. (2013). In addition, we use the universal density profile of Hamaus et al. (2014) to quantify the relationship between coupling and density profile shape, finding that the coupling produces broader, shallower, undercompensated profiles for large voids by thinning the walls between adjacent medium-scale voids. We find that these differences are potentially measurable with existing void catalogs once effects from survey geometries and peculiar velocities are taken into account.
  • We perform an Alcock-Paczynski test using stacked cosmic voids identified in the SDSS Data Release 7 main sample and Data Release 10 LOWZ and CMASS samples. We find ~1,500 voids out to redshift $0.6$ using a heavily modified and extended version of the watershed algorithm ZOBOV, which we call VIDE (Void IDentification and Examination). To assess the impact of peculiar velocities we use the mock void catalogs presented in Sutter et al. (2013). We find a constant uniform flattening of 14% along the line of sight when peculiar velocities are included. This flattening appears universal for all void sizes at all redshifts and for all tracer densities. We also use these mocks to identify an optimal stacking strategy. After correcting for systematic effects we find that our Alcock-Paczynski measurement leads to a preference of our best-fit value of $\Omega_{\rm M}\sim 0.15$ over $\Omega_{\rm M} = 1.0$ by a likelihood ratio of 10. Likewise, we find a factor of $4.5$ preference of the likelihood ratio for a $\Lambda$CDM $\Omega_{\rm M} = 0.3$ model and a null measurement. Taken together, we find substantial evidence for the Alcock-Paczynski signal in our sample of cosmic voids. Our assessment using realistic mocks suggests that measurements with future SDSS releases and other surveys will provide tighter cosmological parameter constraints. The void-finding algorithm and catalogs used in this work will be made publicly available at http://www.cosmicvoids.net.
  • The Dark Sky Simulations are an ongoing series of cosmological N-body simulations designed to provide a quantitative and accessible model of the evolution of the large-scale Universe. Such models are essential for many aspects of the study of dark matter and dark energy, since we lack a sufficiently accurate analytic model of non-linear gravitational clustering. In July 2014, we made available to the general community our early data release, consisting of over 55 Terabytes of simulation data products, including our largest simulation to date, which used $1.07 \times 10^{12}~(10240^3)$ particles in a volume $8h^{-1}\mathrm{Gpc}$ across. Our simulations were performed with 2HOT, a purely tree-based adaptive N-body method, running on 200,000 processors of the Titan supercomputer, with data analysis enabled by yt. We provide an overview of the derived halo catalogs, mass function, power spectra and light cone data. We show self-consistency in the mass function and mass power spectrum at the 1% level over a range of more than 1000 in particle mass. We also present a novel method to distribute and access very large datasets, based on an abstraction of the World Wide Web (WWW) as a file system, remote memory-mapped file access semantics, and a space-filling curve index. This method has been implemented for our data release, and provides a means to not only query stored results such as halo catalogs, but also to design and deploy new analysis techniques on large distributed datasets.
  • We present a simple empirical function for the average density profile of cosmic voids, identified via the watershed technique in $\Lambda$CDM N-body simulations. This function is universal across void size and redshift, accurately describing a large radial range of scales around void centers with only two free parameters. In analogy to halo density profiles, these parameters describe the scale radius and the central density of voids. While we initially start with a more general four-parameter model, we find two of its parameters to be redundant, as they follow linear trends with the scale radius in two distinct regimes of the void sample, separated by its compensation scale. Assuming linear theory, we derive an analytic formula for the velocity profile of voids and find an excellent agreement with the numerical data as well. In our companion paper [Sutter et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 442, 462 (2014)] the presented density profile is shown to be universal even across tracer type, properly describing voids defined in halo and galaxy distributions of varying sparsity, allowing us to relate various void populations by simple rescalings. This provides a powerful framework to match theory and simulations with observational data, opening up promising perspectives to constrain competing models of cosmology and gravity.
  • We report the first measurement of the diminutive lensing signal arising from matter underdensities associated with cosmic voids. While undetectable individually, by stacking the weak gravitational shear estimates around 901 voids detected in SDSS DR7 by Sutter et al. (2012a), we find substantial evidence for a depression of the lensing signal compared to the cosmic mean. This depression is most pronounced at the void radius, in agreement with analytical models of void matter profiles. Even with the largest void sample and imaging survey available today, we cannot put useful constraints on the radial dark-matter void profile. We invite independent investigations of our findings by releasing data and analysis code to the public at https://github.com/pmelchior/void-lensing
  • Galaxy bias, the unknown relationship between the clustering of galaxies and the underlying dark matter density field is a major hurdle for cosmological inference from large-scale structure. While traditional analyses focus on the absolute clustering amplitude of high-density regions mapped out by galaxy surveys, we propose a relative measurement that compares those to the underdense regions, cosmic voids. On the basis of realistic mock catalogs we demonstrate that cross correlating galaxies and voids opens up the possibility to calibrate galaxy bias and to define a static ruler thanks to the observable geometric nature of voids. We illustrate how the clustering of voids is related to mass compensation and show that volume-exclusion significantly reduces the degree of stochasticity in their spatial distribution. Extracting the spherically averaged distribution of galaxies inside voids from their cross correlations reveals a remarkable concordance with the mass-density profile of voids.
  • How do observed voids relate to the underlying dark matter distribution? To examine the spatial distribution of dark matter contained within voids identified in galaxy surveys, we apply Halo Occupation Distribution models representing sparsely and densely sampled galaxy surveys to a high-resolution N-body simulation. We compare these galaxy voids to voids found in the halo distribution, low-resolution dark matter, and high-resolution dark matter. We find that voids at all scales in densely sampled surveys - and medium- to large-scale voids in sparse surveys - trace the same underdensities as dark matter, but they are larger in radius by ~20%, they have somewhat shallower density profiles, and they have centers offset by ~0.4Rv rms. However, in void-to-void comparison we find that shape estimators are less robust to sampling, and the largest voids in sparsely sampled surveys suffer fragmentation at their edges. We find that voids in galaxy surveys always correspond to underdensities in the dark matter, though the centers may be offset. When this offset is taken into account, we recover almost identical radial density profiles between galaxies and dark matter. All mock catalogs used in this work are available at http://www.cosmicvoids.net.
  • We present a novel, general-purpose method for deconvolving and denoising images from gridded radio interferometric visibilities using Bayesian inference based on a Gaussian process model. The method automatically takes into account incomplete coverage of the uv-plane, signal mode coupling due to the primary beam, and noise mode coupling due to uv sampling. Our method uses Gibbs sampling to efficiently explore the full posterior distribution of the underlying signal image given the data. We use a set of widely diverse mock images with a realistic interferometer setup and level of noise to assess the method. Compared to results from a proxy for point source- based CLEAN method we find that in terms of RMS error and signal-to-noise ratio our approach performs better than traditional deconvolution techniques, regardless of the structure of the source image in our test suite. Our implementation scales as O(np log np), provides full statistical and uncertainty information of the reconstructed image, requires no supervision, and provides a robust, consistent framework for incorporating noise and parameter marginalizations and foreground removal.
  • Recently, Nadathur & Hotchkiss (2013) submitted a paper discussing a new cosmic void catalog. This paper includes claims about the void catalog described in Sutter et al. (2012). In this note, we respond to those claims, clarify some discrepancies between the text of Sutter et al. (2012) and the most recent version of the catalog, and provide some comments on the differences between our catalog and that of Nadathur & Hotchkiss (2013). All updates and documentation for our catalog are available at http://www.cosmicvoids.net.
  • The ever increasing size and complexity of data coming from simulations of cosmic structure formation demands equally sophisticated tools for their analysis. During the past decade, the art of object finding in these simulations has hence developed into an important discipline itself. A multitude of codes based upon a huge variety of methods and techniques have been spawned yet the question remained as to whether or not they will provide the same (physical) information about the structures of interest. Here we summarize and extent previous work of the "halo finder comparison project": we investigate in detail the (possible) origin of any deviations across finders. To this extent we decipher and discuss differences in halo finding methods, clearly separating them from the disparity in definitions of halo properties. We observe that different codes not only find different numbers of objects leading to a scatter of up to 20 per cent in the halo mass and Vmax function, but also that the particulars of those objects that are identified by all finders differ. The strength of the variation, however, depends on the property studied, e.g. the scatter in position, bulk velocity, mass, and the peak value of the rotation curve is practically below a few per cent, whereas derived quantities such as spin and shape show larger deviations. Our study indicates that the prime contribution to differences in halo properties across codes stems from the distinct particle collection methods and -- to a minor extent -- the particular aspects of how the procedure for removing unbound particles is implemented. We close with a discussion of the relevance and implications of the scatter across different codes for other fields such as semi-analytical galaxy formation models, gravitational lensing, and observables in general.
  • The detection of the primordial $B$-mode spectrum of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) signal may provide a probe of inflation. However, observation of such a faint signal requires excellent control of systematic errors. Interferometry proves to be a promising approach for overcoming such a challenge. In this paper we present a complete simulation pipeline of interferometric observations of CMB polarization, including systematic errors. We employ two different methods for obtaining the power spectra from mock data produced by simulated observations: the maximum likelihood method and the method of Gibbs sampling. We show that the results from both methods are consistent with each other, as well as, within a factor of 6, with analytical estimates. Several categories of systematic errors are considered: instrumental errors, consisting of antenna gain and antenna coupling errors, and beam errors, consisting of antenna pointing errors, beam cross-polarization and beam shape (and size) errors. In order to recover the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, within a 10% tolerance level, which ensures the experiment is sensitive enough to detect the $B$-signal at $r=0.01$ in the multipole range $28 < \ell < 384$, we find that, for a QUBIC-like experiment, Gaussian-distributed systematic errors must be controlled with precisions of $|g_{rms}| = 0.1$ for antenna gain, $|\epsilon_{rms}| = 5 \times 10^{-4}$ for antenna coupling, $\delta_{rms} \approx 0.7^\circ$ for pointing, $\zeta_{rms} \approx 0.7^\circ$ for beam shape, and $\mu_{rms} = 5 \times 10^{-4}$ for beam cross-polarization.
  • Detection of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation is one of the frontiers of observational cosmology. Because they are an order of magnitude fainter than E-modes, it is quite a challenge to detect B-modes. Having more manageable systematics, interferometers prove to have a substantial advantage over imagers in detecting such faint signals. Here, we present a method for Bayesian inference of power spectra and signal reconstruction from interferometric data of the CMB polarization signal by using the technique of Gibbs sampling. We demonstrate the validity of the method in the flat-sky approximation for a simulation of an interferometric observation on a finite patch with incomplete uv-plane coverage, a finite beam size and a realistic noise model. With a computational complexity of O(n^{3/2}), n being the data size, Gibbs sampling provides an efficient method for analyzing upcoming cosmology observations.
  • We report on the first application of the Alcock-Paczynski test to stacked voids in spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys.We use voids from the Sutter et al. (2012) void catalog, which was derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 main sample and luminous red galaxy catalogs. The construction of that void catalog removes potential shape measurement bias by using a modified version of the ZOBOV algorithm and by removing voids near survey boundaries and masks. We apply the shape-fitting procedure presented in Lavaux & Wandelt (2012) to ten void stacks out to redshift z=0.36. Combining these measurements, we determine the mean cosmologically induced "stretch" of voids in three redshift bins, with 1-sigma errors of 5-15%. The mean stretch is consistent with unity, providing no indication of a distortion induced by peculiar velocities. While the statistical errors are too large to detect the Alcock-Paczynski effect over our limited redshift range, this proof-of-concept analysis defines procedures that can be applied to larger spectroscopic galaxy surveys at higher redshifts to constrain dark energy using the expected statistical isotropy of structures that are minimally affected by uncertainties in galaxy velocity bias.
  • We produce the most comprehensive public void catalog to date using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 main sample out to redshift z=0.2 and the luminous red galaxy sample out to z=0.44. Using a modified version of the parameter-free void finder ZOBOV, we fully take into account the presence of the survey boundary and masks. Our strategy for finding voids is thus appropriate for any survey configuration. We produce two distinct catalogs: a complete catalog including voids near any masks, which would be appropriate for void galaxy surveys, and a bias-free catalog of voids away from any masks, which is necessary for analyses that require a fair sampling of void shapes and alignments. Our discovered voids have effective radii from 5 to 135 h^-1 Mpc. We discuss basic catalog statistics such as number counts and redshift distributions and describe some additional data products derived from our catalog, such as radial density profiles and projected density maps. We find that radial profiles of stacked voids show a qualitatively similar behavior across nearly two decades of void radii and throughout the full redshift range.
  • We present a Bayesian angular power spectrum and signal map inference engine which can be adapted to interferometric observations of anisotropies inthe cosmic microwave background, 21 cm emission line mapping of galactic brightness fluctuations, or 21 cm absorption line mapping of neutral hydrogen in the dark ages. The method uses Gibbs sampling to generate a sampled representation of the angular power spectrum posterior and the posterior of signal maps given a set of measured visibilities in the uv-plane. We use a mock interferometric CMB observation to demonstrate the validity of this method in the flat-sky approximation when adapted to take into account arbitrary coverage of the uv-plane, mode-mode correlations due to observations on a finite patch, and heteroschedastic visibility errors. The computational requirements scale as O(n_p log n_p) where n_p measures the ratio of the size of the detector array to the inter-detector spacing, meaning that Gibbs sampling is a promising technique for meeting the data analysis requirements of future cosmology missions.
  • Cosmological constraints derived from galaxy clusters rely on accurate predictions of cluster observable properties, in which feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is a critical component. In order to model the physical effects due to supermassive black holes (SMBH) on cosmological scales, subgrid modeling is required, and a variety of implementations have been developed in the literature. However, theoretical uncertainties due to model and parameter variations are not yet well understood, limiting the predictive power of simulations including AGN feedback. By performing a detailed parameter sensitivity study in a single cluster using several commonly-adopted AGN accretion and feedback models with FLASH, we quantify the model uncertainties in predictions of cluster integrated properties. We find that quantities that are more sensitive to gas density have larger uncertainties (~20% for Mgas and a factor of ~2 for Lx at R500), whereas Tx, Ysz, and Yx are more robust (~10-20% at R500). To make predictions beyond this level of accuracy would require more constraints on the most relevant parameters: the accretion model, mechanical heating efficiency, and size of feedback region. By studying the impact of AGN feedback on the scaling relations, we find that an anti-correlation exists between Mgas and Tx, which is another reason why Ysz and Yx are excellent mass proxies. This anti-correlation also implies that AGN feedback is likely to be an important source of intrinsic scatter in the Mgas-Tx and Lx-Tx relations.