• We present ground-based and \textit{Swift} observations of iPTF16fnl, a likely tidal disruption event (TDE) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) survey at 66.6 Mpc. The lightcurve of the object peaked at absolute $M_g=-17.2$ mag. The maximum bolometric luminosity (from optical and UV) was $L_p~\simeq~(1.0\,\pm\,0.15) \times 10^{43}$ erg/s, an order of magnitude fainter than any other optical TDE discovered so far. The luminosity in the first 60 days is consistent with an exponential decay, with $L \propto e^{-(t-t_0)/\tau}$, where $t_0$=~57631.0 (MJD) and $\tau\simeq 15$ days. The X-ray shows a marginal detection at $L_X=2.4^{1.9}_{-1.1}\times 10^{39}$ erg/s (\textit{Swift} X-ray Telescope). No radio counterpart was detected down to 3$\sigma$, providing upper limits for monochromatic radio luminosity of $\nu L_{\nu} < 2.3\times10^{36}$ erg/s and $\nu L_{\nu}<1.7\times 10^{37}$ erg/s (VLA, 6.1 and 22 GHz). The blackbody temperature, obtained from combined \textit{Swift} UV and optical photometry, shows a constant value of 19,000 K. The transient spectrum at peak is characterized by broad He II and H$\alpha$ emission lines, with an FWHM of about 14,000 km/s and 10,000 km/s respectively. He I lines are also detected at $\lambda\lambda$ 5875 and 6678. The spectrum of the host is dominated by strong Balmer absorption lines, which are consistent with a post-starburst (E+A) galaxy with an age of $\sim$650 Myr and solar metallicity. The characteristics of iPTF16fnl make it an outlier on both luminosity and decay timescales, as compared to other optically selected TDEs. The discovery of such a faint optical event suggests a higher rate of tidal disruptions, as low luminosity events may have gone unnoticed in previous searches.
  • With the advent of new wide-field, high-cadence optical transient surveys, our understanding of the diversity of core-collapse supernovae has grown tremendously in the last decade. However, the pre-supernova evolution of massive stars, that sets the physical backdrop to these violent events, is theoretically not well understood and difficult to probe observationally. Here we report the discovery of the supernova iPTF13dqy = SN 2013fs, a mere ~3 hr after explosion. Our rapid follow-up observations, which include multiwavelength photometry and extremely early (beginning at ~6 hr post-explosion) spectra, map the distribution of material in the immediate environment (<~ 10^15 cm) of the exploding star and establish that it was surrounded by circumstellar material (CSM) that was ejected during the final ~1 yr prior to explosion at a high rate, around 10^-3 solar masses per year. The complete disappearance of flash-ionised emission lines within the first several days requires that the dense CSM be confined to within <~ 10^15 cm, consistent with radio non-detections at 70--100 days. The observations indicate that iPTF13dqy was a regular Type II SN; thus, the finding that the probable red supergiant (RSG) progenitor of this common explosion ejected material at a highly elevated rate just prior to its demise suggests that pre-supernova instabilities may be common among exploding massive stars.
  • When a star passes within the tidal radius of a supermassive black hole, it will be torn apart. For a star with the mass of the Sun ($M_\odot$) and a non-spinning black hole with a mass $<10^8 M_\odot$, the tidal radius lies outside the black hole event horizon and the disruption results in a luminous flare. Here we report observations over a period of 10 months of a transient, hitherto interpreted as a superluminous supernova. Our data show that the transient rebrightened substantially in the ultraviolet and that the spectrum went through three different spectroscopic phases without ever becoming nebular. Our observations are more consistent with a tidal disruption event than a superluminous supernova because of the temperature evolution, the presence of highly ionised CNO gas in the line of sight and our improved localisation of the transient in the nucleus of a passive galaxy, where the presence of massive stars is highly unlikely. While the supermassive black hole has a mass $> 10^8 M_\odot$, a star with the same mass as the Sun could be disrupted outside the event horizon if the black hole were spinning rapidly. The rapid spin and high black hole mass can explain the high luminosity of this event.
  • Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic) arise from the core-collapse of H (and He) poor stars, which could be either single WR stars or lower-mass stars stripped of their envelope by a companion. Their light curves are radioactively powered and usually show a fast rise to peak ($\sim$10-15 d), without any early (first few days) emission bumps (with the exception of broad-lined SNe Ic) as sometimes seen for other types of stripped-envelope SNe (e.g., Type IIb SN 1993J and Type Ib SN 2008D). We have studied iPTF15dtg, a spectroscopically normal SN Ic with an early excess in the optical light curves followed by a long ($\sim$30 d) rise to the main peak. It is the first spectroscopically-normal double-peaked SN Ic observed. We aim to determine the properties of this explosion and of its progenitor star. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of iPTF15dtg was obtained with multiple telescopes. The resulting light curves and spectral sequence are analyzed and modelled with hydrodynamical and analytical models, with particular focus on the early emission. Results. iPTF15dtg is a slow rising SN Ic, similar to SN 2011bm. Hydrodynamical modelling of the bolometric properties reveals a large ejecta mass ($\sim$10 $M_{\odot}$) and strong $^{56}$Ni mixing. The luminous early emission can be reproduced if we account for the presence of an extended ($\sim$500 R$_{\odot}$), low-mass ($\sim$0.045 M$_{\odot}$) envelope around the progenitor star. Alternative scenarios for the early peak, such as the interaction with a companion, a shock-breakout (SBO) cooling tail from the progenitor surface, or a magnetar-driven SBO are not favored. The large ejecta mass and the presence of H and He free extended material around the star suggest that the progenitor of iPTF15dtg was a massive ($\gtrsim$ 35 M$_{\odot}$) WR star suffering strong mass loss.
  • Temporal variability of narrow absorption lines in high-resolution spectra of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is studied to search for circumstellar matter. Time series which resolve the profiles of absorption lines such as Na I D or Ca II H&K are expected to reveal variations due to photoionisation and subsequent recombination of the gases. The presence, composition, and geometry of circumstellar matter may hint at the elusive progenitor system of SNe Ia and could also affect the observed reddening law. To date, there are few known cases of time-varying Na I D absorption in SNe Ia, all of which occurred during relatively late phases of the supernova evolution. Photoionisation, however, is predicted to occur during the early phases of SNe Ia, when the supernova peaks in the ultraviolet. We therefore attempt to observe early-time absorption-line variations by obtaining high-resolution spectra of SNe before maximum light. We have obtained photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy of SNe Ia 2013gh and iPTF 13dge, to search for absorption- line variations. Furthermore, we study interstellar absorption features in relation to the observed photometric colours of the SNe. Results. Both SNe display deep Na I D and Ca II H&K absorption features. Furthermore, small but significant variations are detected in a feature of the Na I D profile of SN 2013gh. The variations are consistent with either geometric effects of rapidly moving or patchy gas clouds or photoionisation of Na I gas at R \approx 1019 cm from the explosion. Our analysis indicates that it is necessary to focus on early phases to detect photoionisation effects of gases in the circumstellar medium of SNe Ia. Different absorbers such as Na I and Ca II can be used to probe for matter at different distances from the SNe.
  • [Abridged] We present data and initial results from VLT/X-Shooter emission-line spectroscopy of 96 GRB-selected galaxies at 0.1<z<3.6, the largest sample of GRB host spectroscopy available to date. Most of our GRBs were detected by Swift and 76% are at 0.5<z<2.5 with a median z~1.6. Based on Balmer and/or forbidden lines of oxygen, nitrogen, and neon, we measure systemic redshifts, star formation rates (SFRs), visual attenuations, oxygen abundances (12+log(O/H)), and emission-line widths. We find a strong change of the typical physical properties of GRB hosts with redshift. The median SFR, for example, increases from ~0.6 M_sun/yr at z~0.6 up to ~15 M_sun/yr at z~2. A higher ratio of [OIII]/[OII] at higher redshifts leads to an increasing distance of GRB-selected galaxies to the locus of local galaxies in the BPT diagram. Oxygen abundances of the galaxies are distributed between 12+log(O/H)=7.9 and 12+log(O/H)=9.0 with a median of 12+log(O/H)~8.5. The fraction of GRB-selected galaxies with super-solar metallicities is around 20% at z<1 in the adopted metallicity scale. This is significantly less than the fraction of star formation in similar galaxies, illustrating that GRBs are scarce in high-metallicity environments. At z~3, sensitivity limits us to probing only the most luminous GRB hosts for which we derive metallicities of Z ~< 0.5 Z_sun. Together with a high incidence of galaxies with similar metallicity in our sample at z~1.5, this indicates that the metallicity dependence observed at low redshift will not be dominant at z~3.
  • The reionisation of the Universe is thought to have ended around z~6, as inferred from spectroscopy of distant bright background sources, such as quasars (QSO) and gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Furthermore, spectroscopy of a GRB afterglow provides insight in its host galaxy, which is often too dim and distant to study otherwise. We present the high S/N VLT/X-shooter spectrum of GRB130606A at z=5.913. We aim to measure the degree of ionisation of the IGM between 5.02<z<5.84 and to study the chemical abundance pattern and dust content of its host galaxy. We measured the flux decrement due to absorption at Ly$\alpha$, $\beta$ and $\gamma$ wavelength regions. The hydrogen and metal absorption lines formed in the host galaxy were fitted with Voigt profiles to obtain column densities. Our measurements of the Ly$\alpha$-forest optical depth are consistent with previous measurements of QSOs, but have a much smaller uncertainty. The analysis of the red damping wing yields a neutral fraction $x_{HI}<0.05$ (3$\sigma$). We obtain column density measurements of several elements. The ionisation corrections due to the GRB is estimated to be negligible (<0.03 dex), but larger corrections may apply due to the pre-existing radiation field (up to 0.4 dex based on sub-DLA studies). Our measurements confirm that the Universe is already predominantly ionised over the redshift range probed in this work, but was slightly more neutral at z>5.6. GRBs are useful probes of the ionisation state of the IGM in the early Universe, but because of internal scatter we need a larger statistical sample to draw robust conclusions. The high [Si/Fe] in the host can be due to dust depletion, alpha-element enhancement, or a combination of both. The very high value of [Al/Fe]=2.40+/-0.78 might connected to the stellar population history. We estimate the host metallicity to be -1.7<[M/H]<-0.9 (2%-13% of solar). (trunc.)
  • We present the first reported case of the simultaneous metallicity determination of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy, from both afterglow absorption lines as well as strong emission-line diagnostics. Using spectroscopic and imaging observations of the afterglow and host of the long-duration Swift GRB121024A at z = 2.30, we give one of the most complete views of a GRB host/environment to date. We observe a strong damped Ly-alpha absorber (DLA) with a hydrogen column density of log N(HI) = 21.88 +/- 0.10, H2 absorption in the Lyman-Werner bands (molecular fraction of log(f)~ -1.4; fourth solid detection of molecular hydrogen in a GRB-DLA), the nebular emission lines H-alpha, H-beta, [O II], [O III] and [N II], as well as metal absorption lines. We find a GRB host galaxy that is highly star-forming (SFR ~ 40 solar masses/yr ), with a dust-corrected metallicity along the line of sight of [Zn/H]corr = -0.6 +/- 0.2 ([O/H] ~ -0.3 from emission lines), and a depletion factor [Zn/Fe] = 0.85 +/- 0.04. The molecular gas is separated by 400 km/s (and 1-3 kpc) from the gas that is photoexcited by the GRB. This implies a fairly massive host, in agreement with the derived stellar mass of log(M/M_solar ) = 9.9+/- 0.2. We dissect the host galaxy by characterising its molecular component, the excited gas, and the line-emitting star-forming regions. The extinction curve for the line of sight is found to be unusually flat (Rv ~15). We discuss the possibility of an anomalous grain size distributions. We furthermore discuss the different metallicity determinations from both absorption and emission lines, which gives consistent results for the line of sight to GRB 121024A.
  • Context. Gamma-ray burst (GRBs) afterglows probe sightlines to star-forming regions in distant star-forming galaxies. Here we present a study of the peculiar afterglow spectrum of the z = 0.889 Swift GRB 140506A. Aims. Our aim is to understand the origin of the very unusual properties of the absorption along the line-of-sight. Methods. We analyse spectroscopic observations obtained with the X-shooter spectrograph mounted on the ESO/VLT at two epochs 8.8 h and 33 h after the burst as well as imaging from the GROND instrument. We also present imaging and spectroscopy of the host galaxy obtained with the Magellan telescope. Results. The underlying afterglow appears to be a typical afterglow of a long-duration GRB. However, the material along the line-of- sight has imprinted very unusual features on the spectrum. Firstly, there is a very broad and strong flux drop below 8000 AA (4000 AA in the rest frame), which seems to be variable between the two spectroscopic epochs. We can reproduce the flux-drops both as a giant 2175 AA extinction bump and as an effect of multiple scattering on dust grains in a dense environment. Secondly, we detect absorption lines from excited H i and He i. We also detect molecular absorption from CH+ . Conclusions. We interpret the unusual properties of these spectra as reflecting the presence of three distinct regions along the line-of-sight: the excited He i absorption originates from an H ii-region, whereas the Balmer absorption must originate from an associated photodissociation region. The strong metal line and molecular absorption and the dust extinction must originate from a third, cooler region along the line-of-sight. The presence of (at least) three separate regions is reflected in the fact that the different absorption components have different velocities relative to the systemic redshift of the host galaxy.
  • We present the discovery of molecular hydrogen (H_2), including the presence of vibrationally-excited H_2^* in the optical spectrum of the afterglow of GRB 120815A at z=2.36 obtained with X-shooter at the VLT. Simultaneous photometric broad-band data from GROND and X-ray observations by Swift/XRT place further constraints on the amount and nature of dust along the sightline. The galactic environment of GRB 120815A is characterized by a strong DLA with log(N(H)/cm^-2) = 21.95 +/- 0.10, prominent H_2 absorption in the Lyman-Werner bands (log(N(H_2)/cm^-2) = 20.53 +/- 0.13) and thus a molecular gas fraction log f(H_2)=-1.14 +/- 0.15. The distance d between the absorbing neutral gas and GRB 120815A is constrained via photo-excitation modeling of fine-structure and meta-stable transitions of FeII and NiII to d = 0.5 +/- 0.1 kpc. The DLA metallicity ([Zn/H] = -1.15 +/- 0.12), visual extinction (A_V < 0.15 mag) and dust depletion ([Zn/Fe] = 1.01 +/- 0.10) are intermediate between the values of well-studied, H_2-deficient GRB-DLAs observed at high spectral resolution, and the approximately solar metallicity, highly-obscured and H_2-rich GRB 080607 sightline. With respect to N(H), metallicity, as well as dust-extinction and depletion, GRB 120815A is fairly representative of the average properties of GRB-DLAs. This demonstrates that molecular hydrogen is present in at least a fraction of the more typical GRB-DLAs, and H_2 and H_2^* are probably more wide-spread among GRB-selected systems than the few examples of previous detections would suggest.
  • We model the time-variable absorption of FeII, FeIII, SiII, CII and CrII detected in UVES spectra of GRB 080310, with the afterglow radiation exciting and ionizing the interstellar medium in the host galaxy at a redshift of z=2.42743. To estimate the rest-frame afterglow brightness as a function of time, we use a combination of the optical VRI photometry obtained by the RAPTOR-T telescope array -- which are presented in this paper -- and Swift's X-Ray Telescope observations. Excitation alone, which has been successfully applied for a handful of other GRBs, fails to describe the observed column-density evolution in the case of GRB 080310. Inclusion of ionization is required to explain the column-density decrease of all observed FeII levels (including the ground state 6D9/2) and increase of the FeIII 7S3 level. The large population of ions in this latter level (up to 10% of all FeIII) can only be explained through ionization of FeII, whereby a large fraction of the ionized FeII ions -- we calculate 31% using the Flexible Atomic (FAC) and Cowan codes -- initially populate the 7S3 level of FeIII rather than the ground state. This channel for producing a significant FeIII 7S3 level population may be relevant for other objects in which absorption lines from this level -- the UV34 triplet -- are observed, such as BAL quasars and Eta Carinae. This provides conclusive evidence for time-variable ionization in the circumburst medium, which to date has not been convincingly detected. However, the best-fit distance of the neutral absorbing cloud to the GRB is 200--400 pc, i.e. similar to GRB-absorber distance estimates for GRBs without any evidence for ionization. We find that the presence of time-varying ionization in GRB 080310 is likely due to a combination of the super-solar iron abundance ([Fe/H]=+0.2) and the low HI column density (log N(HI)=18.7). [abridged]
  • We present the first search for galaxy counterparts of intervening high-z (2<z< 3.6) sub-DLAs and DLAs towards GRBs. Our final sample comprises of five intervening sub-DLAs and DLAs in four GRB fields. To identify candidate galaxy counterparts of the absorbers we use deep optical and near-infrared imaging, and low-, mid- and high-resolution spectroscopy acquired with 6 to 10-m class telescopes, the Hubble and the Spitzer space telescopes. Furthermore, we use the spectroscopic information and spectral-energy-distribution fitting techniques to study them in detail. Our main result is the detection and spectroscopic confirmation of the galaxy counterpart of the intervening DLA at z=3.096 in the field of GRB 070721B (z_GRB=3.6298) as proposed by other authors. We also identify good candidates for the galaxy counterparts of the two strong MgII absorbers at z=0.6915 and 1.4288 towards GRB 050820A (z_GRB=2.615). The properties of the detected DLA galaxy are typical for Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at similar redshifts; a young, highly starforming galaxy that shows evidence for a galactic outflow. This supports the hypothesis that a DLA can be the gaseous halo of an LBG. In addition, we report a redshift coincidence of different objects associated with metal lines in the same field, separated by 130-161 kpc. The high detection rate of three correlated structures on a length scale as small as ~150 kpc in two pairs of lines of sight is intriguing. The absorbers in each of these are most likely not part of the same gravitationally bound structure. They more likely represent groups of galaxies.
  • We present 10 new gamma-ray burst (GRB) redshifts and another five redshift limits based on host galaxy spectroscopy obtained as part of a large program conducted at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The redshifts span the range 0.345 < z < 2.54. Three of our measurements revise incorrect values from the literature. The homogeneous host sample researched here consists of 69 hosts that originally had a redshift completeness of 55% (with 38 out of 69 hosts having redshifts considered secure). Our project, including VLT/X-shooter observations reported elsewhere, increases this fraction to 77% (53/69), making the survey the most comprehensive in terms of redshift completeness of any sample to the full Swift depth, analyzed to date. We present the cumulative redshift distribution and derive a conservative, yet small, associated uncertainty. We constrain the fraction of Swift GRBs at high redshift to a maximum of 14% (5%) for z > 6 (z > 7). The mean redshift of the host sample is assessed to be <z> > 2.2, with the 10 new redshifts reducing it significantly. Using this more complete sample, we confirm previous findings that the GRB rate at high redshift (z > 3) appears to be in excess of predictions based on assumptions that it should follow conventional determinations of the star formation history of the universe, combined with an estimate of its likely metallicity dependence. This suggests that either star formation at high redshifts has been significantly underestimated, for example due to a dominant contribution from faint, undetected galaxies, or that GRB production is enhanced in the conditions of early star formation, beyond that usually ascribed to lower metallicity.
  • GRB 070125 is among the most energetic bursts detected and the most extensively observed so far. Nevertheless, unresolved issues are still open in the literature on the physics of the afterglow and on the GRB environment. In particular, GRB 070125 was claimed to have exploded in a galactic halo environment, based on the uniqueness of the optical spectrum and the non-detection of an underlying host galaxy. In this work we collect all publicly available data and address these issues by modelling the NIR-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution (SED) and studying the high signal-to-noise VLT/FORS afterglow spectrum in comparison with a larger sample of GRB absorbers. The SED reveals a synchrotron cooling break in the UV, low equivalent hydrogen column density and little reddening caused by a LMC- or SMC-type extinction curve. From the weak MgII absorption at z=1.5477 in the spectrum, we derived logN(MgII)=12.96+0.13-0.18 and upper limits on the ionic column density of several metals. These suggest that the GRB absorber is most likely an LLS with a 0.03Z\odot<Z<1.3Z\odot metallicity. The comparison with other GRB absorbers places GRB070125 at the low end of the absorption line equivalent width distribution, confirming that weak spectral features and spectral-line poor absorbers are not so uncommon in afterglow spectra. Moreover, we show that the effect of photo-ionization on the gas surrounding the GRB, combined with a low N(HI) along a short segment of the line of sight within the host galaxy, can explain the lack of spectral features in GRB070125. Finally, the non-detection of an underlying galaxy is consistent with a faint GRB host galaxy, well within the GRB host brightness distribution. Thus, the possibility that GRB070125 is simply located in the outskirts of a gas-rich, massive star-forming region inside its small and faint host galaxy seems more likely than a gas-poor, halo environment origin.
  • We present high time resolution (1.09 s) photometry of GRB 080210 obtained with ULTRASPEC mounted on the ESO/3.6-m telescope, starting 68.22 min after the burst and lasting for 26.45 min. The light curve is smooth on both short (down to 2.18 s) and long time scales, confirmed by a featureless power spectrum. On top of the fireball power-law decay, bumps and wiggles at different time scales can, in principle, be produced by density fluctuations in the circumburst medium, substructures in the jet or by refreshed shocks. Comparing our constraints with variability limits derived from kinematic arguments, we exclude under-density fluctuations producing flux dips larger than 1 per cent with time scales \Deltat > 9.2 min (2 per cent on \Deltat > 2.3 min for many fluctuating regions). In addition, we study the afterglow VLT/FORS2 spectrum, the optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution (SED) and the time decay. The SED is best fit with a broken power law with slopes {\beta}opt = 0.71 \pm 0.01 and {\beta}X = 1.59 \pm 0.07, in disagreement with the fireball model, suggesting a non-standard afterglow for GRB 080210. We find AV = 0.18 \pm 0.03 mag optical extinction due to SMC-like dust and an excess X-ray absorption of log (NH/cm-2) = 21.58 +0.18 -0.26 assuming Solar abundances. The spectral analysis reveals a damped Ly{\alpha} absorber (log (NH I /cm-2) = 21.90 \pm 0.10) with a low metallicity ([X/H] = -1.21 \pm 0.16), likely associated with the interstellar medium of the GRB host galaxy (z = 2.641).
  • Aims: With this paper we want to investigate the highly variable afterglow light curve and environment of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060526 at $z=3.221$. Methods: We present one of the largest photometric datasets ever obtained for a GRB afterglow, consisting of multi-color photometric data from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. The data set contains 412 data points in total to which we add additional data from the literature. Furthermore, we present low-resolution high signal-to-noise spectra of the afterglow. The afterglow light curve is modeled with both an analytical model using broken power law fits and with a broad-band numerical model which includes energy injections. The absorption lines detected in the spectra are used to derive column densities using a multi-ion single-component curve-of-growth analysis from which we derive the metallicity of the host of GRB 060526. Results: The temporal behaviour of the afterglow follows a double broken power law with breaks at $t=0.090\pm0.005$ and $t=2.401\pm0.061$ days. It shows deviations from the smooth set of power laws that can be modeled by additional energy injections from the central engine, although some significant microvariability remains. The broadband spectral-energy distribution of the afterglow shows no significant extinction along the line of sight. The metallicity derived from \ion{S}{II} and \ion{Fe}{II} of [S/H] = --0.57 $\pm$0.25 and [Fe/H] = --1.09$\pm$0.24 is relatively high for a galaxy at that redshift but comparable to the metallicity of other GRB hosts at similar redshifts. At the position of the afterglow, no host is detected to F775W(AB) = 28.5 mag with the HST, implying an absolute magnitude of the host M(1500 \AA{})$>$--18.3 mag which is fainter than most long-duration hosts, although the GRB may be associated with a faint galaxy at a distance of 11 kpc.
  • We have initiated a survey using the newly commissioned X-shooter spectrograph to target candidate relatively metal-rich damped Lyman-alpha absorbers (DLAs). The spectral coverage of X-shooter allows us to search for not only Lyman-alpha emission, but also rest-frame optical emission lines. We have chosen DLAs where the strongest rest-frame optical lines ([OII], [OIII], Hbeta and Halpha) fall in the NIR atmospheric transmission bands. In this first paper resulting from the survey, we report on the discovery of the galaxy counterpart of the z_abs = 2.354 DLA towards the z=2.926 quasar Q2222$-0946. This DLA is amongst the most metal-rich z>2 DLAs studied so far at comparable redshifts and there is evidence for substantial depletion of refractory elements onto dust grains. We measure metallicities from ZnII, SiII, NiII, MnII and FeII of -0.46+/-0.07, -0.51+/-0.06, -0.85+/-0.06, -1.23+/-0.06, and -0.99+/-0.06, respectively. The galaxy is detected in the Lyman-alpha, [OIII] lambda4959,5007 Halpha emission lines at an impact parameter of about 0.8 arcsec (6 kpc at z_abs = 2.354). We infer a star-formation rate of 10 M_sun yr^-1, which is a lower limit due to the possibility of slit-loss. Compared to the recently determined Halpha luminosity function for z=2.2 galaxies the DLA-galaxy counterpart has a luminosity of L~0.1L^*_Halpha. The emission-line ratios are 4.0 (Lyalpha/Halpha) and 1.2 ([OIII]/Halpha). The Lyalpha line shows clear evidence for resonant scattering effects, namely an asymmetric, redshifted (relative to the systemic redshift) component and a much weaker blueshifted component. The fact that the blueshifted component is relatively weak indicates the presence of a galactic wind. The properties of the galaxy counterpart of this DLA is consistent with the prediction that metal-rich DLAs are associated with the most luminous of the DLA-galaxy counterparts.
  • We analyse the distribution of matter around the progenitor star of gamma-ray burst GRB 021004 as well as the properties of its host galaxy with high-resolution echelle as well as near-infrared spectroscopy. Observations were taken by the 8.2m Very Large Telescope with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle spectrograph (UVES) and the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) between 10 and 14 hours after the onset of the event. We report the first detection of emission lines from a GRB host galaxy in the near-infrared, detecting H-alpha and the [O III] doublet. These allow an independent measurement of the systemic redshift (z = 2.3304 +/- 0.0005) which is not contaminated by absorption as the Ly-alpha line is, and the deduction of properties of the host galaxy. From the visual echelle spectroscopy, we find several absorption line groups spanning a range of about 3,000 km/s in velocity relative to the redshift of the host galaxy. The absorption profiles are very complex with both velocity-broadened components extending over several 100 km/s and narrow lines with velocity widths of only 20 km/s. By analogy with QSO absorption line studies, the relative velocities,widths, and degrees of ionization of the lines ("line-locking", "ionization--velocity correlation") show that the progenitor had both an extremely strong radiation field and several distinct mass loss phases (winds). These results are consistent with GRB progenitors being massive stars, such as Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) or Wolf--Rayet stars, providing a detailed picture of the spatial and velocity structure of the GRB progenitor star at the time of explosion. The host galaxy is a prolific star-forming galaxy with a SFR of about 40 solar masses per year.
  • (Abridged). We present a sample of 77 optical afterglows (OAs) of Swift detected GRBs for which spectroscopic follow-up observations have been secured. We provide linelists and equivalent widths for all detected lines redward of Ly-alpha. We discuss to what extent the current sample of Swift bursts with OA spectroscopy is a biased subsample of all Swift detected GRBs. For that purpose we define an X-ray selected sample of Swift bursts with optimal conditions for ground-based follow up from the period March 2005 to September 2008; 146 bursts fulfill our sample criteria. We derive the redshift distribution for this sample and conclude that less than 19% of Swift bursts are at z>7. We compare the high energy properties for three sub-samples of bursts in the sample: i) bursts with redshifts measured from OA spectroscopy, ii) bursts with detected OA, but no OA-based redshift, and iii) bursts with no detection of the OA. The bursts in group i) have significantly less excess X-ray absorption than bursts in the other two groups. In addition, the fraction of dark bursts is 14% in group i), 38% in group ii) and > 39% in group iii). From this we conclude that the sample of GRBs with OA spectroscopy is not representative for all Swift bursts, most likely due to a bias against the most dusty sight-lines. Finally, we characterize GRB absorption systems as a class and compare them to QSO absorption systems, in particular DLAs. On average GRB absorbers are characterized by significantly stronger EWs for HI as well as for both low and high ionization metal lines than what is seen in intervening QSO absorbers. Based on the z>2 bursts in the sample we place a 95% confidence upper limit of 7.5% on the mean escape fraction of ionizing photons from star-forming galaxies.
  • We aim to understand the nature of the absorbing neutral gas in the galaxies hosting high-redshift long-duration GRBs and to determine their physical conditions. We report the detection of a significant number of previously unidentified allowed transition lines of Fe+, involving the fine structure of the ground term and that of other excited levels, from the zabs=3.969, log N(H0)=22.10 DLA system located in the host galaxy of GRB 050730. The time-dependent evolution of the observed Fe+ energy-level populations is modelled by assuming the excitation mechanism is fluorescence following excitation by ultraviolet photons. This UV pumping model successfully reproduces the observations, yielding a burst/cloud distance (defined to the near-side of the cloud) of d=440\pm 30 pc and a linear cloud size of l=520{+240}{-190} pc. We discuss these results in the context of no detections of H2 and CI lines in a sample of seven z>1.8 GRB host galaxies observed with VLT/UVES. We show that the lack of H2 can be explained by the low metallicities, [X/H]<-1, low depletion factors and, at most, moderate particle densities of the systems. This points to a picture where GRB-DLAs typically exhibiting very high H0 column densities are diffuse metal-poor atomic clouds with high kinetic temperatures, Tkin>~1000 K, and large physical extents, l>~100 pc. The properties of GRB-DLAs observed at high spectral resolution towards bright GRB afterglows differ markedly from the high metal and dust contents of GRB-DLAs observed at lower resolution. This difference likely results from the effect of a bias, against systems of high metallicity and/or close to the GRB, due to dust obscuration in the magnitude-limited GRB afterglow samples observed with high-resolution spectrographs.
  • SN 2008D was discovered while following up an unusually bright X-ray transient in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2770. We present early optical spectra (obtained 1.75 days after the X-ray transient) which allowed the first identification of the object as a supernova at redshift z = 0.007. These spectra were acquired during the initial declining phase of the light curve, likely produced in the stellar envelope cooling after shock breakout, and rarely observed. They exhibit a rather flat spectral energy distribution with broad undulations, and a strong, W-shaped feature with minima at 3980 and 4190 AA (rest frame). We also present extensive spectroscopy and photometry of the supernova during the subsequent photospheric phase. Unlike supernovae associated with gamma-ray bursts, SN 2008D displayed prominent He features and is therefore of Type Ib.
  • The collapsar model predicts that the progenitors of Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are metal poor in Fe group elements. The existence of low metallicity stellar populations could manifest itself through special characteristics of the immediate environment of the GRB site in the host galaxy. We analyse the strong emission lines from the sub-luminous host galaxy of GRB 980425, which showed the first connection with a supernova explosion (SN 1998bw). The host has a sufficient size to allow detailed resolved spectroscopy of individual HII regions and to look for regions with special properties close to the the GRB site. Using integral field spectroscopy with VIMOS we cover most of the high surface brightness part of the host including the HII region where the supernova and GRB occurred. The star formation rate, reddening, equivalent width and stellar mass in the GRB region is similar to other HII regions in the host. Extreme values arise in the only region that shows emission lines from Wolf-Rayet stars; a region that lies 800 pc in projection from the GRB site. Strong emission line diagnostics of all HII regions imply oxygen abundances between 0.3 and 0.8 solar with the lowest values arising in the WR and GRB regions. Comparing the measured emission line ratios for a sample of low redshift GRB hosts to theoretical models and to observations of field galaxies, we find that GRBs arise in a range of metallicity environments while the regions are consistently very young. The similar line ratios of GRB hosts compared to the WR region can arise in spatially unresolved galaxies with bright HII regions near the GRB location. (Abridged)
  • We report on the highly extinguished afterglow of GRB 070306 and the properties of the host galaxy. An optical afterglow was not detected at the location of the burst, but in near-infrared a doubling in brightness during the first night and later power-law decay in the K band provided a clear detection of the afterglow. The host galaxy is relatively bright, R ~ 22.8. An optical low resolution spectrum revealed a largely featureless host galaxy continuum with a single emission line. Higher resolution follow-up spectroscopy shows this emission to be resolved and consisting of two peaks separated by 7 AA, suggesting it to be [O II] at a redshift of z = 1.49594 +- 0.00006. The infrared color H-K = 2 directly reveals significant reddening. By modeling the optical/X-ray spectral energy distribution at t = 1.38 days with an extinguished synchrotron spectrum, we derive A_V = 5.5 +- 0.6 mag. This is among the largest values ever measured for a GRB afterglow and visual extinctions exceeding unity are rare. The importance of early NIR observations is obvious and may soon provide a clearer view into the once elusive 'dark bursts'.
  • We report on follow-up observations of the GRB 060927 using the ROTSE-IIIa telescope and a suite of larger aperture ground-based telescopes. An optical afterglow was detected 20 s after the burst, the earliest rest-frame detection of optical emission from any GRB. Spectroscopy performed with the VLT about 13 hours after the trigger shows a continuum break at lambda ~ 8070 A produced by neutral hydrogen absorption at z~5.6. We also detect an absorption line at 8158 A which we interpret as SiII at z=5.467. Hence, GRB 060927 is the second most distant GRB with a spectroscopically measured redshift. The shape of the red wing of the spectral break can be fitted by a damped Lyalpha profile with a column density with log(N_HI/cm^-2) ~ 22.5. We discuss the implications of this work for the use of GRBs as probes of the end of the dark ages and draw three main conclusions: i) GRB afterglows originating from z>6 should be relatively easy to detect from the ground, but rapid NIR monitoring is necessary to ensure that they are found; ii) The presence of large HI column densities in some GRBs host galaxies at z>5 makes the use of GRBs to probe the reionization epoch via spectroscopy of the red damping wing challenging; iii) GRBs appear crucial to locate typical star-forming galaxies at z>5 and therefore the type of galaxies responsible for the reionization of the universe.
  • We present high resolution VLT UVES and low resolution FORS optical spectroscopy of supernova 2006aj and its host galaxy, associated with the nearby (z = 0.03342) gamma-ray burst GRB 060218. This host galaxy is a unique case, as it is one of the few nearby GRB host galaxies known, and it is only the second time high resolution spectra have been taken of a nearby GRB host galaxy (after GRB 980425). The resolution, wavelength range and S/N of the UVES spectrum combined with low resolution FORS spectra allow a detailed analysis of the circumburst and host galaxy environments. We analyse the emission and absorption lines in the spectrum, combining the high resolution UVES spectrum with low resolution FORS spectra and find the metallicity and chemical abundances in the host. We probe the geometry of the host by studying the emission line profiles. Our spectral analysis shows that the star forming region in the host is metal poor with 12 + log(O/H) = 7.54 (+0.17, -0.10) (~0.07 Z_sun), placing it among the most metal deficient subset of emission-line galaxies. It is also the lowest metallicity found so far for a GRB host from an emission-line analysis. Given the stellar mass of the galaxy of ~10^7 M_sun and the SFR (H alpha) = 0.065 +/- 0.005 M_sun/yr, the high specific star formation rate indicates an age for the galaxy of less than ~200 Myr. The brightest emission lines are clearly asymmetric and are well fit by two Gaussian components separated by ~22$ km/s. We detect two discrete Na I and Ca II absorption components at the same redshifts as the emission components. We tentatively interpret the two components as arising from two different starforming regions in the host, but high resolution imaging is necessary to confirm this.