• Visual photometry of 16 WC8-9 dust-making Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars during 2001--2009 was extracted from the All Sky Automated Survey All Star Catalogue (ASAS-3) to search for eclipses attributable to extinction by dust formed in clumps in our line of sight. Data for a comparable number of dust-free WC6-9 stars were also examined to help characterise the dataset. Frequent eclipses were observed from WR 104, and several from WR 106, extending the 1994-2001 studies by Kato et al. (2002a,b), but not supporting their phasing the variations in WR 104 with its `pinwheel' rotation period. Only four other stars showed eclipses, WR 50 (one of the dust-free stars), WR 69, WR 95 and WR 117, and there may have been an eclipse by WR 121, which had shown two eclipses in the past. No dust eclipses were shown by the `historic' eclipsers WR 103 and WR 113. The atmospheric eclipses of the latter were observed but the suggestion by David-Uraz et al. (2012) that dust may be partly responsible for these is not supported. Despite its frequent eclipses, there is no evidence in the infrared images of WR 104 for dust made in its eclipses, demonstrating that any dust formed in this process is not a significant contributor to its circumstellar dust cloud and suggesting that the same applies to the other stars showing fewer eclipses.
  • Infrared photometry of the probable triple WC4(+O?)+O8I: Wolf-Rayet system HD 36402 (= BAT99-38) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) shows emission characteristic of heated dust. The dust emission is variable on a time-scale of years, with a period near 4.7 yr, possibly associated with orbital motion of the O8 supergiant and the inner P ~ 3.03-d WC4+O binary. The phase of maximum dust emission is close to that of the X-ray minimum, consistent with both processes being tied to colliding wind effects in an elliptical binary orbit. It is evident that Wolf-Rayet dust formation occurs also in metal-poor environments.
  • We present the results from the spectroscopic follow-up of WR140 (WC7 + O4-5) during its last periastron passage in January 2009. This object is known as the archetype of colliding wind binaries and has a relatively large period (~ 8 years) and eccentricity (~ 0.89). We provide updated values for the orbital parameters, new estimates for the WR and O star masses and new constraints on the mass-loss rates.
  • We present preliminary results of a 3-month campaign carried out in the framework of the Mons project, where time-resolved Halpha observations are used to study the wind and circumstellar properties of a number of OB stars.
  • Infrared photometry of the probable triple WC4 (+O?) +O8I: system HD 36402 (BAT99-38) in the LMC shows emission characteristic of heated dust. Although HD 36402 is close to two luminous YSOs, it is possible to distinguish its emission at wavelengths less than 10 microns. Simple modelling indicates a dust temperature near 800 K and mass of about 1.5e-7 Msol amorphous carbon grains. The dust emission appears to be variable. It is apparent that Wolf Rayet dust formation occurs also in metal-poor environments.
  • We present high-resolution infrared (2--18 micron) images of the archetypal periodic dust-making Wolf-Rayet binary system WR140 (HD 193793) taken between 2001 and 2005, and multi-colour (J -- [19.5]) photometry observed between 1989 and 2001. The images resolve the dust cloud formed by WR140 in 2001, allowing us to track its expansion and cooling, while the photometry allows tracking the average temperature and total mass of the dust. The combination of the two datasets constrains the optical properties of the dust. The most persistent dust features, two concentrations at the ends of a `bar' of emission to the south of the star, were observed to move with constant proper motions of 324+/-8 and 243+/-7 mas/y. Longer wavelength (4.68-micron and 12.5-micron) images shows dust emission from the corresponding features from the previous (1993) periastron passage and dust-formation episode. A third persistent dust concentration to the east of the binary (the `arm') was found to have a proper motion ~ 320 mas/y. Extrapolation of the motions of the concentrations back to the binary suggests that the eastern `arm' began expansion 4--5 months earlier than those in the southern `bar', consistent with the projected rotation of the binary axis and wind-collision region (WCR) on the sky. Comparison of model dust images and the observations constrain the intervals when the WCR was producing sufficiently compressed wind for dust nucleation in the WCR, and suggests that the distribution of this material was not uniform about the axis of the WCR, but more abundant in the following edge in the orbital plane.
  • We describe the WFCAM Science Archive (WSA), which is the primary point of access for users of data from the wide-field infrared camera WFCAM on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT), especially science catalogue products from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). We describe the database design with emphasis on those aspects of the system that enable users to fully exploit the survey datasets in a variety of different ways. We give details of the database-driven curation applications that take data from the standard nightly pipeline-processed and calibrated files for the production of science-ready survey datasets. We describe the fundamentals of querying relational databases with a set of astronomy usage examples, and illustrate the results.
  • Observations of the 1.083-micron He I line in WR140 (HD 193793) show P-Cygni profiles which varied as the binary system went through periastron passage. A sub-peak appeared on the normally flat-topped emission component and then moved across the profile consistent with its formation in the wind-collision region. Variation of the absorption component provided constraints on the opening angle (theta) of the wind-collision region. Infrared (2-10 micron) images observed with a variety of instruments in 2001-04 resolve the dust cloud formed in 2001, and show it to be expanding at a constant rate. Owing to the high eccentricity of the binary orbit, the dust is spread around the orbital plane in a 'splash' and we compare the dust images with the orientation of the orbit.
  • We present new spectra of WR 140 (HD 193793) in the JHK bands with some covering the 1.083-micron He I emission line at higher resolution, observed between 2000 October and 2003 May to cover its 2001 periastron passage. The WC7 + O4-5 spectroscopic binary WR 140 is the prototype of colliding-wind, episodic dust-making Wolf-Rayet systems which also show strong variations in radio and X-ray emission. The JHK spectra showed changes in continuum and in the equivalent widths of the WC emission lines, consistent with formation of dust starting between 2001 January 3 and March 26 (orbital phases 0.989 and 0.017) and its subsequent fading and cooling. The 1.083-micron He I line has a P-Cygni profile which showed variations in both absorption and emission components as WR 140 went through periastron passage. The variation of the absorption component yielded tight constraints on the geometry of the wind-collision region, giving theta = 50 +/- 8 degrees for the opening semi-angle of the interaction `cone', indicating a wind-momentum ratio of the O to the WR star=0.1, about three times larger than previously believed. As the system approached periastron, the emission component showed the appearance of a significant sub-peak, movement of which across the profile was seen to be consistent with its formation in wind material flowing along the contact discontinuity between the two stellar winds and the changing orientation of the colliding wind region. The flux carried in the sub-peak exceeded the X-ray fluxes measured at previous periastron passages. This additional source of radiative cooling of the shock-heated gas probably causes it to depart from being adiabatic around periastron passage, thereby accounting for the departure of the X-ray flux from its previously expected $1/d$-dependency.