• By exploiting two ACS/HST datasets separated by a temporal baseline of ~7 years, we have determined the relative stellar proper motions (providing membership) and the absolute proper motion of the Galactic globular cluster M71. The absolute proper motion has been used to reconstruct the cluster orbit within a Galactic, three-component, axisymmetric potential. M71 turns out to be in a low latitude disk-like orbit inside the Galactic disk, further supporting the scenario in which it lost a significant fraction of its initial mass. Since large differential reddening is known to affect this system, we took advantage of near-infrared, ground-based observations to re-determine the cluster center and density profile from direct star counts. The new structural parameters turn out to be significantly different from the ones quoted in the literature. In particular, M71 has a core and a half-mass radii almost 50% larger than previously thought. Finally we estimate that the initial mass of M71 was likely one order of magnitude larger than its current value, thus helping to solve the discrepancy with the observed number of X-ray sources.
  • We used ultra-deep $J$ and $K_s$ images secured with the near-infrared GSAOI camera assisted by the multi-conjugate adaptive optics system GeMS at the GEMINI South Telescope in Chile, to obtain a ($K_s$, $J-K_s$) color-magnitude diagram (CMD) for the bulge globular cluster NGC 6624. We obtained the deepest and most accurate near-infrared CMD from the ground for this cluster, by reaching $K_s$ $\sim$ 21.5, approximately 8 magnitudes below the horizontal branch level. The entire extension of the Main Sequence (MS) is nicely sampled and at $K_s$ $\sim$ 20 we detected the so-called MS "knee" in a purely near-infrared CMD. By taking advantage of the exquisite quality of the data, we estimated the absolute age of NGC 6624 ($t_{age}$ = 12.0 $\pm$ 0.5 Gyr), which turns out to be in good agreement with previous studies in the literature. We also analyzed the luminosity and mass functions of MS stars down to M $\sim$ 0.45 M$_{\odot}$ finding evidence of a significant increase of low-mass stars at increasing distances from the cluster center. This is a clear signature of mass segregation, confirming that NGC 6624 is in an advanced stage of dynamical evolution.
  • We used a combination of Hubble Space Telescope and ground based data to probe the dynamical state of the low mass Galactic globular cluster NGC 6101. We have re-derived the structural parameters of the cluster by using star counts and we find that it is about three times more extended than thought before. By using three different indicators, namely the radial distribution of Blue Straggler Stars, that of Main Sequence binaries and the luminosity (mass) function, we demonstrated that NGC 6101 shows no evidence of mass segregation, even in the innermost regions. Indeed, both the BSS and the binary radial distributions fully resemble that of any other cluster population. In addition the slope of the luminosity (mass) functions does not change with the distance, as expected for non relaxed stellar systems. NGC 6101 is one of the few globulars where the absence of mass segregation has been observed so far. This result provides additional support to the use of the "dynamical clock" calibrated on the radial distribution of the Blue Stragglers as a powerful indicator of the cluster dynamical age.
  • By exploiting two sets of high-resolution images obtained with HST ACS/WFC over a baseline of ~10 years we have measured relative proper motions of ~70,000 stars in the stellar system Terzan 5. The results confirm the membership of the three sub-populations with different iron abudances discovered in the system. The orbit of the system has been derived from a first estimate of its absolute proper motion, obtained by using bulge stars as reference. The results of the integration of this orbit within an axisymmetric Galactic model exclude any external accretion origin for this cluster. Terzan 5 is known to have chemistry similar to the Galactic bulge; our findings support a kinematic link between the cluster and the bulge, further strengthening the possibility that Terzan 5 is the fossil remnant of one of the pristine clumps that originated the bulge.
  • By exploiting the exceptional high-resolution capabilities of the near-IR camera GSAOI combined with the multi-conjugate adaptive optics system GeMS at the GEMINI South Telescope, we investigated the structural and physical properties of the heavily obscured globular cluster Liller 1 in the Galactic bulge. We have obtained the deepest and most accurate color-magnitude diagram published so far for this cluster, reaching Ks ~ 19 (below the main sequence turn-off level). We used these data to re-determine the center of gravity of the system, finding that it is located about 2.2" south-east from the literature value. We also built new star density and surface brightness profiles for the cluster, and re-derived its main structural and physical parameters (scale radii, concentration parameter, central mass density, total mass). We find that Liller 1 is significantly less concentrated (concentration parameter c=1.74) and less extended (tidal radius r_t=298" and core radius r_c=5.39") than previously thought. By using these newly determined structural parameters we estimated the mass of Liller 1 M_tot = 2.3 x 10^6 Msun (Mtot = 1.5 x 10^6 Msun for a Kroupa IMF), which is comparable to that of the most massive clusters in the Galaxy (omega Centauri and Terzan 5). Also Liller 1 has the second highest collision rate (after Terzan 5) among all star clusters in the Galaxy, thus confirming that it is an ideal environment for the formation of collisional objects (such as millisecond pulsars).
  • We present semi-analytical models and simplified $N$-body simulations with $10^4$ and $10^5$ particles aimed at probing the role of dynamical friction (DF) in determining the radial distribution of Blue Straggler Stars (BSSs) in globular clusters. The semi-analytical models show that DF (which is the only evolutionary mechanism at work) is responsible for the formation of a bimodal distribution with a dip progressively moving toward the external regions of the cluster. However, these models fail to reproduce the formation of the long-lived central peak observed in all dynamically evolved clusters. The results of $N$-body simulations confirm the formation of a sharp central peak, which remains as a stable feature over the time regardless of the initial concentration of the system. In spite of a noisy behavior, a bimodal distribution forms in many cases, with the size of the dip increasing as a function of time. In the most advanced stages the distribution becomes monotonic. These results are in agreement with the observations. Also the shape of the peak and the location of the minimum (which in most of the cases is within 10 core radii) turn out to be consistent with observational results. For a more detailed and close comparison with observations, including a proper calibration of the timescales of the dynamical processes driving the evolution of the BSS spatial distribution, more realistic simulations will be necessary.
  • We present the first evidence of multiple populations in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6362. We used optical and near-UV Hubble Space Telescope and ground based photometry, finding that both the sub giant and red giant branches are split in two parallel sequences in all color magnitude diagrams where the F336W filter (or U band) is used. This cluster is one of the least massive globulars (M_tot~5x10^4 M_sun) where multiple populations have been detected so far. Even more interestingly and at odds with any previous finding, we observe that the two identified populations share the same radial distribution all over the cluster extension. NGC 6362 is the first system where stars from different populations are found to be completely spatially mixed. Based on N-body and hydrodynamical simulations of multiple stellar generations, we argue that, to reproduce these findings, NGC 6362 should have lost up to the 80% of its original mass
  • We have used a combination of high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 and wide-field ground-based observations, in ultraviolet and optical bands, to study the blue straggler star population of the massive outer-halo globular cluster NGC 5824, over its entire radial extent. We have computed the center of gravity of the cluster and constructed the radial density profile, from detailed star counts. The profile is well reproduced by a Wilson model with a small core (r_c \simeq 4.4 arcsec) and a concentration parameter c \simeq 2.74. We also present the first age determination for this cluster. From the comparison with isochrones, we have found t=13\pm0.5 Gyr. We discuss this result in the context of the observed age-metallicity relation of Galactic globular clusters. A total of 60 bright blue stragglers has been identified. Their radial distribution is found to be bimodal, with a central peak, a well defined minimum at r \sim 20 arcsec, and an upturn at large radii. In the framework of the dynamical clock defined by Ferraro et al. (2012), this feature suggests that NGC 5824 is a cluster of intermediate dynamical age.
  • We used high-quality images acquired with the WFC3 on board the HST to probe the blue straggler star (BSS) population of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 362. We have found two distinct sequences of BSS: this is the second case, after M 30, where such a feature has been observed. Indeed the BSS location, their extension in magnitude and color and their radial distribution within the cluster nicely resemble those observed in M 30, thus suggesting that the same interpretative scenario can be applied: the red BSS sub-population is generated by mass transfer binaries, the blue one by collisions. The discovery of four new W UMa stars, three of which lying along the red-BSS sequence, further supports this scenario. We also found that the inner portion of the density profile deviates from a King model and is well reproduced by either a mild power-law (\alpha -0.2) or a double King profile. This feature supports the hypothesis that the cluster is currently undergoing the core collapse phase. Moreover, the BSS radial distribution shows a central peak and monotonically decreases outward without any evidence of an external rising branch. This evidence is a further indication of the advanced dynamical age of NGC 362: in fact, together with M 30, NGC 362 belongs to the family of dynamically old clusters (Family III) in the "dynamical clock" classification proposed by Ferraro et al. (2012). The observational evidence presented here strengthens the possible connection between the existence of a double BSS sequence and a quite advanced dynamical status of the parent cluster.
  • We present a detailed investigation of the radial distribution of blue straggler star and binary populations in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 5466, over the entire extension of the system. We used a combination of data acquired with the ACS on board the Hubble Space Telescope, the LBC-blue mounted on the Large Binocular Telescope, and MEGACAM on the Canadian-France-Hawaii Telescope. Blue straggler stars show a bimodal distribution with a mild central peak and a quite internal minimum. This feature is interpreted in terms of a relatively young dynamical age in the framework of the "dynamical clock" concept proposed by Ferraro et al. (2012). The estimated fraction of binaries is 6-7% in the central region (r<90") and slightly lower (5.5%) in the outskirts, at r>200". Quite interestingly, the comparison with the results of Milone et al. (2012) suggests that also binary systems may display a bimodal radial distribution, with the position of the minimum consistent with that of blue straggler stars. If confirmed, this feature would give additional support to the scenario where the radial distribution of objects more massive than the average cluster stars is primarily shaped by the effect of dynamical friction. Moreover, this would also be consistent with the idea that the unperturbed evolution of primordial binaries could be the dominant BSS formation process in low-density environments.
  • We used a proper combination of high-resolution HST observations and wide-field ground based data to derive the radial star density profile of 26 Galactic globular clusters from resolved star counts (which can be all freely downloaded on-line). With respect to surface brightness (SB) profiles (which can be biased by the presence of sparse, bright stars), star counts are considered to be the most robust and reliable tool to derive cluster structural parameters. For each system a detailed comparison with both King and Wilson models has been performed and the most relevant best-fit parameters have been obtained. This is the largest homogeneous catalog collected so far of star count profiles and structural parameters derived therefrom. The analysis of the data of our catalog has shown that: (1) the presence of the central cusps previously detected in the SB profiles of NGC 1851, M13 and M62 is not confirmed; (2) the majority of clusters in our sample are fitted equally well by the King and the Wilson models; (3) we confirm the known relationship between cluster size (as measured by the effective radius) and galactocentric distances; (4) the ratio between the core and the effective radii shows a bimodal distribution, with a peak at ~ 0.3 for about 80% of the clusters, and a secondary peak at ~ 0.6 for the remaining 20%. Interestingly, the main peak turns out to be in agreement with what expected from simulations of cluster dynamical evolution and the ratio between these two radii well correlates with an empirical dynamical age indicator recently defined from the observed shape of blue straggler star radial distribution, thus suggesting that no exotic mechanisms of energy generation are needed in the cores of the analyzed clusters.
  • Globular star clusters that formed at the same cosmic time may have evolved rather differently from a dynamical point of view (because that evolution depends on the internal environment) through a variety of processes that tend progressively to segregate stars more massive than the average towards the cluster centre. Therefore clusters with the same chronological age may have reached quite different stages of their dynamical history (that is, they may have different dynamical ages). Blue straggler stars have masses greater than those at the turn-off point on the main sequence and therefore must be the result of either a collision or a mass-transfer event. Because they are among the most massive and luminous objects in old clusters, they can be used as test particles with which to probe dynamical evolution. Here we report that globular clusters can be grouped into a few distinct families on the basis of the radial distribution of blue stragglers. This grouping corresponds well to an effective ranking of the dynamical stage reached by stellar systems, thereby permitting a direct measure of the cluster dynamical age purely from observed properties.
  • We report the detection of a stellar density cusp and a velocity dispersion increase in the center of the globular cluster M54, located at the center of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). The central line of sight velocity dispersion is 20.2 +/- 0.7 km/s, decreasing to 16.4 +/- 0.4 km/s at 2.5" (0.3 pc). Modeling the kinematics and surface density profiles as the sum of a King model and a point-mass yields a black hole (BH) mass of ~ 9400 M_sun. However, the observations can alternatively be explained if the cusp stars possess moderate radial anisotropy. A Jeans analysis of the Sgr nucleus reveals a strong tangential anisotropy, probably a relic from the formation of the system.
  • Preliminary results are presented about a fully self-consistent N-body simulation of a sample of four massive globular clusters in close interaction within the central region of a galaxy. The N-body representation (with N=1.5x10^6 particles in total) of both the clusters and the galaxy allows to include in a natural and self-consistent way dynamical friction and tidal interactions. The results confirm the decay and merging of globulars as a viable scenario for the formation/accretion of compact nuclear clusters. Specifically: i) the frictional orbital decay is about 2 times faster than that predicted by the generalized Chandrasekhar formula; ii) the progenitor clusters merge in less than 20 galactic core-crossing time; iii) the NC configuration keeps a quasi-stable state at least within 70 galactic core-crossing times.
  • By means of a multimass isotropic and spherical model that includes the self-consistent treatment of a central intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH), the influence of this black hole on the morphological and physical properties of globular clusters is investigated. In agreement with recent numerical studies, it is found that a cluster (with mass M) hosting an IMBH (with mass M_BH) shows, outside the region of gravitational influence of the black hole, a core-like profile resembling a King profile with concentration c < 2, although with a slightly steeper behaviour in the core region. In particular, the core logarithmic slope is s < 0.25 for reasonably low IMBH masses (M_BH < M/100), and c decreases monotonically with M_BH. Completely power-law density profiles (similar to, for example, those of collapsed clusters) are admitted only in the presence of a black hole with an unrealistic M_BH > M. The mass range estimate 12s - 4.8 < log (M_BH/M)< -1.1c - 0.69, depending on the morphological parameters, is deduced by considering a wide range of models. Applying this estimate to a set of 39 globular clusters, it is found that NGC 2808, NGC 6388, M80, M13, M62, M54 and G1 (in M31) probably host an IMBH. For them, the scaling laws M_BH ~ 0.09(M/M_sol)^{0.7} M_sol and M_BH ~ 50[sigma/ (km s^-1)]^{1.2} M_sol are identified from weighted least-squares fits. An important result of this 'collective' study is that a strong correlation exists between the presence of an extreme blue horizontal branch and the presence of an IMBH. In particular, the presence of a central IMBH in M13 and NGC 6388 could explain why these clusters possess extreme horizontal-branch stars, in contrast to their 'second parameter' counterparts M3 and 47 Tuc.
  • The main topic of this paper is the investigation of the modes of interaction of globular clusters (GCs) moving in the inner part of a galaxy. This is tackled by means of high-resolution N-body simulations, whose first results are presented in this article. Our simulations dealt with primordial very massive (order of 10^7 solar masses) GCs that were able to decay, because of dynamical friction, into the inner regions of triaxial galaxies on a time much shorter than their internal relaxation time. To check the disruptive role of both tidal forces and GC-GC collisions, we maximised the tidal interaction considering GCs on quasi-radial orbits. The available CPU resources allowed us to follow 8 oscillations of the GCs along their orbits and the main findings are: i) clusters with an initial high enough King concentration parameter (c>=1.2), preserve up to 50% of their initial mass; ii) the inner density distribution of the survived clusters keep a King model profile; iii) GC-GC collisions have a negligible effect with respect to that caused by the passage through the galactic center; iv) the orbital energy dissipation due to the tidal interaction is of the same order of that caused by dynamical friction; v) complex sub-structures like "ripples" and "clumps" formed, as observed around real clusters. These findings support the validity of the hypothesis of merging of GCs in the galactic central region, with modes that deserve further careful investigations.
  • We present some results of numerical simulations of a globular cluster orbiting in the central region of a triaxial galaxy on a set of 'loop' orbits. Tails start forming after about a quarter of the globular cluster orbital period and develop, in most cases, along the cluster orbit, showing clumpy substructures as observed, for example, in Palomar 5. If completely detectable, clumps can contain about 7,000 solar masses each, i.e. about 10% of the cluster mass at that epoch. The morphology of tails and clumps and the kinematical properties of stars in the tails are studied and compared with available observational data. Our finding is that the stellar velocity dispersion tends to level off at large radii, in agreement to that found for M15 and Omega Centauri.
  • In this talk we discuss some of the main theoretical problems in the understanding of the statistical properties of gravity. By means of N-body simulations we approach the problem of understanding the r\^ole of gravity in the clustering of a finite set of N-interacting particles which samples a portion of an infinite system. Through the use of the conditional average density, we study the evolution of the clustering for the system putting in evidence some interesting and not yet understood features of the process.
  • We study gravitational clustering of mass points in three dimensions with random initial positions and periodic boundary conditions (no expansion) by numerical simulations. Correlation properties are well defined in the system and a sort of thermodynamic limit can be defined for the transient regime of cluste ring. Structure formation proceeds along two paths: (i) fluid-like evolution of density perturbations at large scales and (ii) shift of the granular (non fluid) properties from small to large scales. The latter mechanism finally dominates at all scales and it is responsible for the self-similar characteristics of the clustering.
  • We describe a parallel version of our tree-code for the simulation of self-gravitating systems in Astrophysics. It is based on a dynamic and adaptive method for the domain decomposition, which exploits the hierarchical data arrangement used by the tree-code. It shows low computational costs for the parallelization overhead -- less than 4% of the total CPU-time in the tests done -- because the domain decomposition is performed 'on the fly' during the tree setting and the portion of the tree that is local to each processor 'enriches' itself of remote data only when they are actually needed. The performances of an implementation of the parallel code on a Cray T3E are presented and discussed. They exhibit a very good behaviour of the speedup (=15 with 16 processors and 10^5 particles) and a rather low load unbalancing (< 10% using up to 16 processors), achieving a high computation speed in the forces evaluation (>10^4 particles/sec with 8 processors).