• Weak measurement enables faithful amplification and high precision measurement of small physical parameters and is under intensive investigation as an effective tool in metrology and for addressing foundational questions in quantum mechanics. Most of the experimental reports on weak measurements till date have employed external symmetric Gaussian pointers. Here, we demonstrate its universal nature in a system involving asymmetric spectral response of Fano resonance as the pointer arising naturally in precisely designed metamaterials, namely, waveguided plasmonic crystals. The weak coupling arises due to a tiny shift in the asymmetric spectral response between two orthogonal linear polarizations. By choosing the pre- and post-selected polarization states to be nearly mutually orthogonal, we observe both real and imaginary weak value amplifications manifested as spectacular shift of the peak frequency of Fano resonance and narrowing (or broadening) of the resonance line width, respectively. Weak value amplification using asymmetric Fano spectral response broadens the domain of applicability of weak measurements using natural spectral line shapes as pointer in wide range of physical systems.
  • While no regularization is consistent with the anomalous chiral symmetry which occurs for massless fermions, the artificial axion-induced symmetry for massive fermions is shown here to be consistent with a standard regularization, even in curved spacetime, so that it can be said to have no anomaly in gauge or gravitational fields. Implications for theta terms are pointed out.
  • New results are reported from the operation of the PICO-60 dark matter detector, a bubble chamber filled with 52 kg of C$_3$F$_8$ located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory. As in previous PICO bubble chambers, PICO-60 C$_3$F$_8$ exhibits excellent electron recoil and alpha decay rejection, and the observed multiple-scattering neutron rate indicates a single-scatter neutron background of less than 1 event per month. A blind analysis of an efficiency-corrected 1167-kg-day exposure at a 3.3-keV thermodynamic threshold reveals no single-scattering nuclear recoil candidates, consistent with the predicted background. These results set the most stringent direct-detection constraint to date on the WIMP-proton spin-dependent cross section at 3.4 $\times$ 10$^{-41}$ cm$^2$ for a 30-GeV$\thinspace$c$^{-2}$ WIMP, more than one order of magnitude improvement from previous PICO results.
  • The PICASSO dark matter search experiment operated an array of 32 superheated droplet detectors containing 3.0 kg of C$_{4}$F$_{10}$ and collected an exposure of 231.4 kgd at SNOLAB between March 2012 and January 2014. We report on the final results of this experiment which includes for the first time the complete data set and improved analysis techniques including \mbox{acoustic} localization to allow fiducialization and removal of higher activity regions within the detectors. No signal consistent with dark matter was observed. We set limits for spin-dependent interactions on protons of $\sigma_p^{SD}$~=~1.32~$\times$~10$^{-2}$~pb (90\%~C.L.) at a WIMP mass of 20 GeV/c$^{2}$. In the spin-independent sector we exclude cross sections larger than $\sigma_p^{SI}$~=~4.86~$\times$~10$^{-5 }$~pb~(90\% C.L.) in the region around 7 GeV/c$^{2}$. The pioneering efforts of the PICASSO experiment have paved the way forward for a next generation detector incorporating much of this technology and experience into larger mass bubble chambers.
  • We observe a large fraction of circular polarization in radio emission from extensive air showers recorded during thunderstorms, much higher than in the emission from air showers measured during fair-weather circumstances. We show that the circular polarization of the air showers measured during thunderstorms can be explained by the change in the direction of the transverse current as a function of altitude induced by atmospheric electric fields. Thus by using the full set of Stokes parameters for these events, we obtain a good characterization of the electric fields in thunderclouds. We also measure a large horizontal component of the electric fields in the two events that we have analysed.
  • For the interpretation of measurements of radio emission from extensive air showers, an important systematic uncertainty arises from natural variations of the atmospheric refractive index $n$. At a given altitude, the refractivity $N=10^6\, (n-1)$ can have relative variations on the order of $10 \%$ depending on temperature, humidity, and air pressure. Typical corrections to be applied to $N$ are about $4\%$. Using CoREAS simulations of radio emission from air showers, we have evaluated the effect of varying $N$ on measurements of the depth of shower maximum $X_{\rm max}$. For an observation band of 30 to 80 MHz, a difference of $4 \%$ in refractivity gives rise to a systematic error in the inferred $X_{\rm max}$ between 3.5 and 11 $\mathrm{g/cm^2}$, for proton showers with zenith angles ranging from 15 to 50 degrees. At higher frequencies, from 120 to 250 MHz, the offset ranges from 10 to 22 $\mathrm{g/cm^2}$. These offsets were found to be proportional to the geometric distance to $X_{\rm max}$. We have compared the results to a simple model based on the Cherenkov angle. For the 120 to 250 MHz band, the model is in qualitative agreement with the simulations. In typical circumstances, we find a slight decrease in $X_{\rm max}$ compared to the default refractivity treatment in CoREAS. While this is within commonly treated systematic uncertainties, accounting for it explicitly improves the accuracy of $X_{\rm max}$ measurements.
  • The low flux of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) at the highest energies provides a challenge to answer the long standing question about their origin and nature. Even lower fluxes of neutrinos with energies above $10^{22}$ eV are predicted in certain Grand-Unifying-Theories (GUTs) and e.g.\ models for super-heavy dark matter (SHDM). The significant increase in detector volume required to detect these particles can be achieved by searching for the nano-second radio pulses that are emitted when a particle interacts in Earth's moon with current and future radio telescopes. In this contribution we present the design of an online analysis and trigger pipeline for the detection of nano-second pulses with the LOFAR radio telescope. The most important steps of the processing pipeline are digital focusing of the antennas towards the Moon, correction of the signal for ionospheric dispersion, and synthesis of the time-domain signal from the polyphased-filtered signal in frequency domain. The implementation of the pipeline on a GPU/CPU cluster will be discussed together with the computing performance of the prototype.
  • Axion fields were originally introduced to control CP violation due to the theta term in QCD. Pauli-Villars regularization, or the use of a parity symmetric fermion measure, however, preserves CP in the fermion sector. A CP violation arising from the theta term can then be neutralized in a natural way by setting theta equal to zero.
  • We report here on a novel analysis of the complete set of four Stokes parameters that uniquely determine the linear and/or circular polarization of the radio signal for an extensive air shower. The observed dependency of the circular polarization on azimuth angle and distance to the shower axis is a clear signature of the interfering contributions from two different radiation mechanisms, a main contribution due to a geomagnetically-induced transverse current and a secondary component due to the build-up of excess charge at the shower front. The data, as measured at LOFAR, agree very well with a calculation from first principles. This opens the possibility to use circular polarization as an investigative tool in the analysis of air shower structure, such as for the determination of atmospheric electric fields.
  • The low flux of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) at the highest energies provides a challenge to answer the long standing question about their origin and nature. A significant increase in the number of detected UHECR is expected to be achieved by employing Earth's moon as detector, and search for short radio pulses that are emitted when a particle interacts in the lunar rock. Observation of these short pulses with current and future radio telescopes also allows to search for the even lower fluxes of neutrinos with energies above $10^{22}$ eV, that are predicted in certain Grand-Unifying-Theories (GUTs), and e.g. models for super-heavy dark matter (SHDM). In this contribution we present the initial design for such a search with the LOFAR radio telescope.
  • We present a simple yet elegant Mueller matrix approach for controlling the Fano interference effect and engineering the resulting asymmetric spectral line shape in anisotropic optical system. The approach is founded on a generalized model of anisotropic Fano resonance, which relates the spectral asymmetry to two physically meaningful and experimentally accessible parameters of interference, namely, the Fano phase shift and the relative amplitudes of the interfering modes. The differences in these parameters between orthogonal linear polarizations in an anisotropic system are exploited to desirably tune the Fano spectral asymmetry using pre- and post-selection of optimized polarization states. Experimental control on the Fano phase and the relative amplitude parameters and resulting tuning of spectral asymmetry is demonstrated in waveguided plasmonic crystals using Mueller matrix-based polarization analysis. The approach enabled tailoring of several exotic regimes of Fano resonance including the complete reversal of the spectral asymmetry. The demonstrated control and the ensuing large tunability of Fano resonance in anisotropic systems shows potential for Fano resonance-based applications involving control and manipulation of electromagnetic waves at the nano scale.
  • New data are reported from a second run of the 2-liter PICO-2L C$_3$F$_8$ bubble chamber with a total exposure of 129$\,$kg-days at a thermodynamic threshold energy of 3.3$\,$keV. These data show that measures taken to control particulate contamination in the superheated fluid resulted in the absence of the anomalous background events observed in the first run of this bubble chamber. One single nuclear-recoil event was observed in the data, consistent both with the predicted background rate from neutrons and with the observed rate of unambiguous multiple-bubble neutron scattering events. The chamber exhibits the same excellent electron-recoil and alpha decay rejection as was previously reported. These data provide the most stringent direct detection constraints on weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-proton spin-dependent scattering to date for WIMP masses $<$ 50$\,$GeV/c$^2$.
  • New data are reported from the operation of the PICO-60 dark matter detector, a bubble chamber filled with 36.8 kg of CF$_3$I and located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory. PICO-60 is the largest bubble chamber to search for dark matter to date. With an analyzed exposure of 92.8 livedays, PICO-60 exhibits the same excellent background rejection observed in smaller bubble chambers. Alpha decays in PICO-60 exhibit frequency-dependent acoustic calorimetry, similar but not identical to that reported recently in a C$_3$F$_8$ bubble chamber. PICO-60 also observes a large population of unknown background events, exhibiting acoustic, spatial, and timing behaviors inconsistent with those expected from a dark matter signal. These behaviors allow for analysis cuts to remove all background events while retaining $48.2\%$ of the exposure. Stringent limits on weakly interacting massive particles interacting via spin-dependent proton and spin-independent processes are set, and most interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA modulation signal as dark matter interacting with iodine nuclei are ruled out.
  • New data are reported from the operation of a 2-liter C$_3$F$_8$ bubble chamber in the 2100 meter deep SNOLAB underground laboratory, with a total exposure of 211.5 kg-days at four different recoil energy thresholds ranging from 3.2 keV to 8.1 keV. These data show that C3F8 provides excellent electron recoil and alpha rejection capabilities at very low thresholds, including the first observation of a dependence of acoustic signal on alpha energy. Twelve single nuclear recoil event candidates were observed during the run. The candidate events exhibit timing characteristics that are not consistent with the hypothesis of a uniform time distribution, and no evidence for a dark matter signal is claimed. These data provide the most sensitive direct detection constraints on WIMP-proton spin-dependent scattering to date, with significant sensitivity at low WIMP masses for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering.
  • Most calculations of black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity indicate a term proportional to the area eigenvalue A with a correction involving the logarithm of A. This violates the additivity of the entropy. An entropy proportional to A, with a correction term involving the logarithm of the classical area k, which is consistent with the additivity of entropy, is derived in both U(1) and SU(2) formulations.
  • Earlier calculations of black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity have given a term proportional to the area with a correction involving the logarithm of the area when the area eigenvalue is close to the classical area. However the calculations yield an entropy proportional to the area eigenvalue with no such correction when the area eigenvalue is large compared to the classical area.
  • Earlier calculations of black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity led to a dominant term proportional to the area, but there was a correction involving the logarithm of the area, the Chern-Simons level being assumed to be large. We find that the calculations yield an entropy proportional to the area eigenvalue with no such correction if the Chern-Simons level is finite, so that the area eigenvalue can be relatively large.
  • Attempts to understand Hawking radiation as tunnelling across a black hole horizon require the consideration of singular integrals. Although Schwarzschild coordinates lead to the standard Hawking temperature, isotropic radial coordinates may appear to produce an incorrect value. It is demonstrated here how the proper regularization of singular integrals leads to the standard temperature for the isotropic radial coordinates as well as for other smooth transformations of the radial variable, which of course describe the same black hole.
  • If the zeta function regularization is used and a complex mass term considered for fermions, the phase does not appear in the fermion determinant. This is not a drawback of the regularization, which can recognize the phase through source terms, as demonstrated by the anomaly equation which is explicitly derived here for a complex mass term.
  • Black hole thermodynamics suggests that a black hole should have an entropy given by a quarter of the area of its horizon. Earlier calculations in U(1) loop quantum gravity have led to a dominant term proportional to the area, but there was a correction involving the logarithm of the area. We find however that SU(2) loop quantum gravity can provide an entropy that is strictly proportional to the area as expected from black hole thermodynamics.
  • Recent results from the PICASSO dark matter search experiment at SNOLAB are reported. These results were obtained using a subset of 10 detectors with a total target mass of 0.72 kg of 19F and an exposure of 114 kgd. The low backgrounds in PICASSO allow recoil energy thresholds as low as 1.7 keV to be obtained which results in an increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV/c^2. No dark matter signal was found. Best exclusion limits in the spin dependent sector were obtained for WIMP masses of 20 GeV/c^2 with a cross section on protons of sigma_p^SD = 0.032 pb (90% C.L.). In the spin independent sector close to the low mass region of 7 GeV/c2 favoured by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, cross sections larger than sigma_p^SI = 1.41x10^-4 pb (90% C.L.) are excluded.
  • The two ways of counting microscopic states of black holes in the U(1) formulation of loop quantum gravity, one counting all allowed spin network labels j,m and the other only m labels, are discussed in some detail. The constraints on m are clarified and the map between the flux quantum numbers and m discussed. Configurations with |m|=j, which are sometimes sought after, are shown to be important only when large areas are involved. The discussion is extended to the SU(2) formulation.
  • We report magnetoresistance measurements over an extensive temperature range (0.1 K $\leq T \leq$ 100 K) in a disordered ferromagnetic semiconductor (\gma). The study focuses on a series of metallic \gma~ epilayers that lie in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition ($k_F l_e\sim 1$). At low temperatures ($T < 4$ K), we first confirm the results of earlier studies that the longitudinal conductivity shows a $T^{1/3}$ dependence, consistent with quantum corrections from carrier localization in a ``dirty'' metal. In addition, we find that the anomalous Hall conductivity exhibits universal behavior in this temperature range, with no pronounced quantum corrections. We argue that observed scaling relationship between the low temperature longitudinal and transverse resistivity, taken in conjunction with the absence of quantum corrections to the anomalous Hall conductivity, is consistent with the side-jump mechanism for the anomalous Hall effect. In contrast, at high temperatures ($T \gtrsim 4$ K), neither the longitudinal nor the anomalous Hall conductivity exhibit universal behavior, indicating the dominance of inelastic scattering contributions down to liquid helium temperatures.
  • Counting of microscopic states of black holes is discussed within the framework of loop quantum gravity. There are two different ways, one allowing for all spin states and the other involving only pure horizon states. The number of states with a definite value of the total spin is also found.
  • Hawking radiation has recently been explained by using solutions of wave equations across black hole horizons in a WKB approximation. Higher order calculations using both usual and non-singular coordinates are found to change the solution for zero spin, but this change is not an alteration of the Hawking temperature. For spin 1/2, there is no correction to the simplest form of the solution.