• We investigate the interaction between the magnetized stellar wind plasma and the partially ionized hydrodynamic hydrogen outflow from the escaping upper atmosphere of non- or weakly magnetized hot Jupiters. We use the well-studied hot Jupiter HD 209458b as an example for similar exoplanets, assuming a negligible intrinsic magnetic moment. For this planet, the stellar wind plasma interaction forms an obstacle in the planet's upper atmosphere, in which the position of the magnetopause is determined by the condition of pressure balance between the stellar wind and the expanded atmosphere, heated by the stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. We show that the neutral atmospheric atoms penetrate into the region dominated by the stellar wind, where they are ionized by photo-ionization and charge exchange, and then mixed with the stellar wind flow. Using a 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, we show that an induced magnetic field forms in front of the planetary obstacle, which appears to be much stronger compared to those produced by the solar wind interaction with Venus and Mars. Depending on the stellar wind parameters, because of the induced magnetic field, the planetary obstacle can move up to ~0.5-1 planetary radii closer to the planet. Finally, we discuss how estimations of the intrinsic magnetic moment of hot Jupiters can be inferred by coupling hydrodynamic upper planetary atmosphere and MHD stellar wind interaction models together with UV observations. In particular, we find that HD 209458b should likely have an intrinsic magnetic moment of 10-20% that of Jupiter.
  • Stellar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may play an important role in mass- and angular momentum loss of young Sun-like stars. If occurring frequently, they may also have a strong effect on planetary evolution by increasing atmospheric erosion. So far it has not been possible to infer the occurrence frequency of stellar CMEs from observations. Based on their close relation with flares on the Sun, we develop an empirical model combining solar flare-CME relationships with stellar flare rates to estimate the CME activity of young Sun-like and late-type main-sequence stars. By comparison of the obtained CME mass-loss rates with observations of total mass-loss rates, we find that our modeled rates may exceed those from observations by orders of magnitude for the most active stars. This reveals a possible limit to the extrapolation of such models to the youngest stars. We find that the most uncertain component in the model is the flare-CME association rate adopted from the Sun, which does not properly account for the likely stronger coronal confinement in active stars. Simple estimates of this effect reveal a possible suppression of CME rates by several orders of magnitude for young stars, indicating that this issue should be addressed in more detail in the future.
  • Planetary embryos form protoplanets via mutual collisions, which can lead to the development of magma oceans. During their solidification, large amounts of the mantles' volatile contents may be outgassed. The resulting H$_2$O/CO$_2$ dominated steam atmospheres may be lost efficiently via hydrodynamic escape due to the low gravity and the high stellar EUV luminosities. Protoplanets forming later from such degassed building blocks could therefore be drier than previously expected. We model the outgassing and subsequent hydrodynamic escape of steam atmospheres from such embryos. The efficient outflow of H drags along heavier species (O, CO$_2$, noble gases). The full range of possible EUV evolution tracks of a solar-mass star is taken into account to investigate the escape from Mars-sized embryos at different orbital distances. The envelopes are typically lost within a few to a few tens of Myr. Furthermore, we study the influence on protoplanetary evolution, exemplified by Venus. We investigate different early evolution scenarios and constrain realistic cases by comparing modeled noble gas isotope ratios with observations. Starting from solar values, consistent isotope ratios (Ne, Ar) can be found for different solar EUV histories, as well as assumptions about the initial atmosphere (either pure steam or a mixture with accreted H). Our results generally favor an early accretion scenario with a small amount of accreted H and a low-activity Sun, because in other cases too much CO$_2$ is lost during evolution, which is inconsistent with Venus' present atmosphere. Important issues are likely the time at which the initial steam atmosphere is outgassed and/or the amount of CO$_2$ which may still be delivered at later evolutionary stages. A late accretion scenario can only reproduce present isotope ratios for a highly active young Sun, but then very massive steam atmospheres would be required.
  • Stimulated by the discovery of a number of close-in low-density planets, we generalise the Jeans escape parameter taking hydrodynamic and Roche lobe effects into account. We furthermore define $\Lambda$ as the value of the Jeans escape parameter calculated at the observed planetary radius and mass for the planet's equilibrium temperature and considering atomic hydrogen, independently of the atmospheric temperature profile. We consider 5 and 10 $M_{\oplus}$ planets with an equilibrium temperature of 500 and 1000 K, orbiting early G-, K-, and M-type stars. Assuming a clear atmosphere and by comparing escape rates obtained from the energy-limited formula, which only accounts for the heating induced by the absorption of the high-energy stellar radiation, and from a hydrodynamic atmosphere code, which also accounts for the bolometric heating, we find that planets whose $\Lambda$ is smaller than 15-35 lie in the "boil-off" regime, where the escape is driven by the atmospheric thermal energy and low planetary gravity. We find that the atmosphere of hot (i.e. $T_{\rm eq}\gtrapprox$ 1000 K) low-mass ($M_{\rm pl}\lessapprox$ 5 $M_{\oplus}$) planets with $\Lambda$ < 15-35 shrinks to smaller radii so that their $\Lambda$ evolves to values higher than 15-35, hence out of the boil-off regime, in less than $\approx$500 Myr. Because of their small Roche lobe radius, we find the same result also for hot (i.e. $T_{\rm eq}\gtrapprox$ 1000 K) higher mass ($M_{\rm pl}\lessapprox$ 10 $M_{\oplus}$) planets with $\Lambda$ < 15-35, when they orbit M-dwarfs. For old, hydrogen-dominated planets in this range of parameters, $\Lambda$ should therefore be $\geq$15-35, which provides a strong constraint on the planetary minimum mass and maximum radius and can be used to predict the presence of aerosols and/or constrain planetary masses, for example.
  • We present the analysis of six nights of spectroscopic monitoring of two young and fast rotating late-type stars, namely the dMe star HK Aqr and the dG/dK star PZ Tel. On both stars we detect absorption features reminiscent of signatures of co-rotating cool clouds or prominences visible in H$\alpha$. Several prominences on HK Aqr show periodic variability in the prominence tracks which follow a sinusoidal motion (indication of prominence oscillations). On PZ Tel we could not find any periodic variability in the prominence tracks. By fitting sinusoidal functions to the prominence tracks we derive amplitudes and periods which are similar to those of large amplitude oscillations seen in solar prominences. In one specific event we also derive a periodic variation of the prominence track in the H$\beta$ spectral line which shows an anti-phase variation with the one derived for the H$\alpha$ spectral line. Using these parameters and estimated mass density of a prominence on HK Aqr we derive a minimum magnetic field strength of $\sim$2G. The relatively low strength of the magnetic field is explained by the large height of this stellar prominence ($\ge$ 0.67 stellar radii above the surface).
  • For the hot exoplanets CoRoT-24b and CoRoT-24c, observations have provided transit radii R$_{\rm T}$ of 3.7$\pm$0.4 R$_{\oplus}$ and 4.9$\pm$0.5 R$_{\oplus}$, and masses of $\le$5.7 M$_{\oplus}$ and 28$\pm$11 M$_{\oplus}$, respectively. We study their upper atmosphere structure and escape applying an hydrodynamic model. Assuming R$_{\rm T} \approx$ R$_{\rm PL}$, where R$_{\rm PL}$ is the planetary radius at the pressure of 100 mbar, we obtained for CoRoT-24b unrealistically high thermally-driven hydrodynamic escape rates. This is due to the planet's high temperature and low gravity, independent of the stellar EUV flux. Such high escape rates could last only for $<$100 Myr, while R$_{\rm PL}$ shrinks till the escape rate becomes less than or equal to the maximum possible EUV-driven escape rate. For CoRoT-24b, R$_{\rm PL}$ must be therefore located at $\approx 1.9-2.2$ R$_{\oplus}$ and high altitude hazes/clouds possibly extinct the light at R$_{\rm T}$. Our analysis constraints also the planet's mass to be 5$-$5.7 M$_{\oplus}$. For CoRoT-24c, R$_{\rm PL}$ and R$_{\rm T}$ lie too close together to be distinguished in the same way. Similar differences between R$_{\rm PL}$ and R$_{\rm T}$ may be present also for other hot, low-density sub-Neptunes.
  • The ultrafast-rotating ($P_\mathrm{rot}\approx0.44 d$) fully convective single M4 dwarf V374 Peg is a well-known laboratory for studying intense stellar activity in a stable magnetic topology. As an observable proxy for the stellar magnetic field, we study the stability of the light curve, and thus the spot configuration. We also measure the occurrence rate of flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We analyse spectroscopic observations, $BV(RI)_C$ photometry covering 5 years, and additional $R_C$ photometry that expands the temporal base over 16 years. The light curve suggests an almost rigid-body rotation, and a spot configuration that is stable over about 16 years, confirming the previous indications of a very stable magnetic field. We observed small changes on a nightly timescale, and frequent flaring, including a possible sympathetic flare. The strongest flares seem to be more concentrated around the phase where the light curve indicates a smaller active region. Spectral data suggest a complex CME with falling-back and re-ejected material, with a maximal projected velocity of $\approx$675km/s. We observed a CME rate much lower than expected from extrapolations of the solar flare-CME relation to active stars.
  • We investigate the loss rates of the hydrogen atmospheres of terrestrial planets with a range of masses and orbital distances by assuming a stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) luminosity that is 100 times stronger than that of the current Sun. We apply a 1D upper atmosphere radiation absorption and hydrodynamic escape model that takes into account ionization, dissociation and recombination to calculate hydrogen mass loss rates. We study the effects of the ionization, dissociation and recombination on the thermal mass loss rates of hydrogen-dominated super-Earths and compare the results to those obtained by the energy-limited escape formula which is widely used for mass loss evolution studies. Our results indicate that the energy-limited formula can to a great extent over- or underestimate the hydrogen mass loss rates by amounts that depend on the stellar EUV flux and planetary parameters such as mass, size, effective temperature, and EUV absorption radius.
  • Terrestrial planets formed within gaseous protoplanetary disks can accumulate significant hydrogen envelopes. The evolution of such an atmosphere due to XUV driven evaporation depends on the activity evolution of the host star, which itself depends sensitively on its rotational evolution, and therefore on its initial rotation rate. In this letter, we derive an easily applicable method for calculating planetary atmosphere evaporation that combines models for a hydrostatic lower atmosphere and a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere. We show that the initial rotation rate of the central star is of critical importance for the evolution of planetary atmospheres and can determine if a planet keeps or loses its primordial hydrogen envelope. Our results highlight the need for a detailed treatment of stellar activity evolution when studying the evolution of planetary atmospheres.
  • The evolution and escape of the martian atmosphere and the planet's water inventory can be separated into an early and late evolutionary epoch. The first epoch started from the planet's origin and lasted $\sim$500 Myr. Because of the high EUV flux of the young Sun and Mars' low gravity it was accompanied by hydrodynamic blow-off of hydrogen and strong thermal escape rates of dragged heavier species such as O and C atoms. After the main part of the protoatmosphere was lost, impact-related volatiles and mantle outgassing may have resulted in accumulation of a secondary CO$_2$ atmosphere of a few tens to a few hundred mbar around $\sim$4--4.3 Gyr ago. The evolution of the atmospheric surface pressure and water inventory of such a secondary atmosphere during the second epoch which lasted from the end of the Noachian until today was most likely determined by a complex interplay of various nonthermal atmospheric escape processes, impacts, carbonate precipitation, and serpentinization during the Hesperian and Amazonian epochs which led to the present day surface pressure.
  • By considering martian-like planetary embryos inside the habitable zone of solar-like stars we study the behavior of the hydrodynamic atmospheric escape of hydrogen for small values of the Jeans escape parameter $\beta < 3$, near the base of the thermosphere, that is defined as a ratio of the gravitational and thermal energy. Our study is based on a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model that calculates the volume heating rate in a hydrogen dominated thermosphere due to the absorption of the stellar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) flux. We find that when the $\beta$ value near the mesopause/homopause level exceeds a critical value of $\sim$2.5, there exists a steady hydrodynamic solution with a smooth transition from subsonic to supersonic flow. For a fixed XUV flux, the escape rate of the upper atmosphere is an increasing function of the temperature at the lower boundary. Our model results indicate a crucial enhancement of the atmospheric escape rate, when the Jeans escape parameter $\beta$ decreases to this critical value. When $\beta$ becomes $\leq$2.5, there is no stationary hydrodynamic transition from subsonic to supersonic flow. This is the case of a fast non-stationary atmospheric expansion that results in extreme thermal atmospheric escape rates.
  • We study the origin and escape of catastrophically outgassed volatiles (H$_2$O, CO$_2$) from exomoons with Earth-like densities and masses of $0.1M_{\oplus}$, $0.5M_{\oplus}$ and $1M_{\oplus}$ orbiting an extra-solar gas giant inside the habitable zone of a young active solar-like star. We apply a radiation absorption and hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model to the three studied exomoon cases. We model the escape of hydrogen and dragged dissociation products O and C during the activity saturation phase of the young host star. Because the soft X-ray and EUV radiation of the young host star may be up to $\sim$100 times higher compared to today's solar value during the first 100 Myr after the system's origin, an exomoon with a mass $ < 0.25M_{\oplus}$ located in the HZ may not be able to keep an atmosphere because of its low gravity. Depending on the spectral type and XUV activity evolution of the host star, exomoons with masses between $\sim0.25-0.5M_{\oplus}$ may evolve to Mars-like habitats. More massive bodies with masses $ > 0.5M_{\oplus}$, however, may evolve to habitats that are a mixture of Mars-like and Earth-analogue habitats, so that life may originate and evolve at the exomoon's surface.
  • Transit observations of HD 209458b in the stellar Lyman-$\alpha$ (Ly$\alpha$) line revealed strong absorption in both blue and red wings of the line interpreted as hydrogen atoms escaping from the planet's exosphere at high velocities. The following sources for the absorption were suggested: acceleration by the stellar radiation pressure, natural spectral line broadening, charge exchange with stellar wind. We reproduce the observation by means of modelling that includes all aforementioned processes. Our results support a stellar wind with a velocity of $\approx400$ km$\times$s$^{-1}$ at the time of the observation and a planetary magnetic moment of $\approx 1.6 \times 10^{26}$ A$\times$m$^2$.
  • R.P.J. Tilanus, T.P. Krichbaum, J.A. Zensus, A. Baudry, M. Bremer, H. Falcke, G. Giovannini, R. Laing, H. J. van Langevelde, W. Vlemmings, Z. Abraham, J. Afonso, I. Agudo, A. Alberdi, J. Alcolea, D. Altamirano, S. Asadi, K. Assaf, P. Augusto, A-K. Baczko, M. Boeck, T. Boller, M. Bondi, F. Boone, G. Bourda, R. Brajsa, J. Brand, S. Britzen, V. Bujarrabal, S. Cales, C. Casadio, V. Casasola, P. Castangia, J. Cernicharo, P. Charlot, L. Chemin, Y. Clenet, F. Colomer, F. Combes, J. Cordes, M. Coriat, N. Cross, F. D'Ammando, D. Dallacasa, J-F. Desmurs, R. Eatough, A. Eckart, D. Eisenacher, S. Etoka, M. Felix, R. Fender, M. Ferreira, E. Freeland, S. Frey, C. Fromm, L. Fuhrmann, K. Gabanyi, R. Galvan-Madrid, M. Giroletti, C. Goddi, J. Gomez, E. Gourgoulhon, M. Gray, I. di Gregorio, R. Greimel, N. Grosso, J. Guirado, K. Hada, A. Hanslmeier, C. Henkel, F. Herpin, P. Hess, J. Hodgson, D. Horns, E. Humphreys, B. Hutawarakorn Kramer, V. Ilyushin, V. Impellizzeri, V. Ivanov, M. Julião, M. Kadler, E. Kerins, P. Klaassen, K. van 't Klooster, E. Kording, M. Kozlov, M. Kramer, A. Kreikenbohm, O. Kurtanidze, J. Lazio, A. Leite, M. Leitzinger, J. Lepine, S. Levshakov, R. Lico, M. Lindqvist, E. Liuzzo, A. Lobanov, P. Lucas, K. Mannheim, J. Marcaide, S. Markoff, I. Martí-Vidal, C. Martins, N. Masetti, M. Massardi, K. Menten, H. Messias, S. Migliari, A. Mignano, J. Miller-Jones, D. Minniti, P. Molaro, S. Molina, A. Monteiro, L. Moscadelli, C. Mueller, A. Müller, S. Muller, F. Niederhofer, P. Odert, H. Olofsson, M. Orienti, R. Paladino, F. Panessa, Z. Paragi, T. Paumard, P. Pedrosa, M. Pérez-Torres, G. Perrin, M. Perucho, D. Porquet, I. Prandoni, S. Ransom, D. Reimers, M. Rejkuba, L. Rezzolla, A. Richards, E. Ros, A. Roy, A. Rushton, T. Savolainen, R. Schulz, M. Silva, G. Sivakoff, R. Soria-Ruiz, R. Soria, M. Spaans, R. Spencer, B. Stappers, G. Surcis, A. Tarchi, M. Temmer, M. Thompson, J. Torrelles, J. Truestedt, V. Tudose, T. Venturi, J. Verbiest, J. Vieira, P. Vielzeuf, F. Vincent, N. Wex, K. Wiik, T. Wiklind, J. Wilms, E. Zackrisson, H. Zechlin
    July 1, 2014 astro-ph.IM
    Very long baseline interferometry at millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths (mmVLBI) offers the highest achievable spatial resolution at any wavelength in astronomy. The anticipated inclusion of ALMA as a phased array into a global VLBI network will bring unprecedented sensitivity and a transformational leap in capabilities for mmVLBI. Building on years of pioneering efforts in the US and Europe the ongoing ALMA Phasing Project (APP), a US-led international collaboration with MPIfR-led European contributions, is expected to deliver a beamformer and VLBI capability to ALMA by the end of 2014 (APP: Fish et al. 2013, arXiv:1309.3519). This report focuses on the future use of mmVLBI by the international users community from a European viewpoint. Firstly, it highlights the intense science interest in Europe in future mmVLBI observations as compiled from the responses to a general call to the European community for future research projects. A wide range of research is presented that includes, amongst others: - Imaging the event horizon of the black hole at the centre of the Galaxy - Testing the theory of General Relativity an/or searching for alternative theories - Studying the origin of AGN jets and jet formation - Cosmological evolution of galaxies and BHs, AGN feedback - Masers in the Milky Way (in stars and star-forming regions) - Extragalactic emission lines and astro-chemistry - Redshifted absorption lines in distant galaxies and study of the ISM and circumnuclear gas - Pulsars, neutron stars, X-ray binaries - Testing cosmology - Testing fundamental physical constants
  • We present a search for stellar activity (flares and mass ejections) in a sample of 28 stars in the young open cluster Blanco-1. We use optical spectra obtained with ESO's VIMOS multi-object spectrograph installed on the VLT. From the total observing time of $\sim$ 5 hours, we find four H$\alpha$ flares but no distinct indication of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on the investigated dK-dM stars. Two flares show "dips" in their light-curves right before their impulsive phases which are similar to previous discoveries in photometric light-curves of active dMe stars. We estimate an upper limit of $<$4 CMEs per day per star and discuss this result with respect to a semi- empirical estimation of the CME rate of main-sequence stars. We find that we should have detected at least one CME per star with a mass of 1-15$\times10^{16}$ g depending on the star's X-ray luminosity, but the estimated H$\alpha$ fluxes associated with these masses are below the detection limit of our observations. We conclude that the parameter which mainly influences the detection of stellar CMEs using the method of Doppler-shifted emission caused by moving plasma is not the spectral resolution or velocity but the flux or mass of the CME.
  • We investigate the influence of impacts of large planetesimals and small planetary embryos on the early Martian surface on the hydrodynamic escape of an early steam atmosphere that is exposed to the high soft X-ray and EUV flux of the young Sun. Impact statistics in terms of number, masses, velocities, and angles of asteroid impacts onto the early Mars are determined via n-body integrations. Based on these statistics, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations result in estimates of energy transfer into the planetary surface material and according surface heating. For the estimation of the atmospheric escape rates we applied a soft X-ray and EUV absorption model and a 1-D upper atmosphere hydrodynamic model to a magma ocean-related catastrophically outgassed steam atmosphere with surface pressure values of 52 bar H2O and 11 bar CO2. The estimated impact rates and energy deposition onto an early Martian surface can account for substantial heating. The energy influx and conversion rate into internal energy is most likely sufficient to keep a shallow magma ocean liquid for an extended period of time. Higher surface temperatures keep the outgassed steam atmosphere longer in vapor form and therefore enhance its escape to space within about 0.6 Myr after its formation.
  • We study the interactions between stellar wind and the extended hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres of planets and the resulting escape of planetary pick-up ions from the 5 "super-Earths" in the compact Kepler-11 system and compare the escape rates with the efficiency of the thermal escape of neutral hydrogen atoms. Assuming the stellar wind of Kepler-11 is similar to the solar wind, we use a polytropic 1D hydrodynamic wind model to estimate the wind properties at the planetary orbits. We apply a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Model to model the hydrogen coronae and the stellar wind plasma interaction around Kepler-11b-f within a realistic expected heating efficiency range of 15-40%. The same model is used to estimate the ion pick-up escape from the XUV heated and hydrodynamically extended upper atmospheres of Kepler-11b-f. From the interaction model we study the influence of possible magnetic moments, calculate the charge exchange and photoionization production rates of planetary ions and estimate the loss rates of pick-up H+ ions for all five planets. We compare the results between the five "super-Earths" and in a more general sense also with the thermal escape rates of the neutral planetary hydrogen atoms. Our results show that for all Kepler-11b-f exoplanets, a huge neutral hydrogen corona is formed around the planet. The non-symmetric form of the corona changes from planet to planet and is defined mostly by radiation pressure and gravitational effects. Non-thermal escape rates of pick-up ionized hydrogen atoms for Kepler-11 "super-Earths" vary between approximately 6.4e30 1/s and 4.1e31 1/s depending on the planet's orbital location and assumed heating efficiency. These values correspond to non-thermal mass loss rates of approximately 1.07e7 g/s and 6.8e7 g/s respectively, which is a few percent of the thermal escape rates.
  • We investigate the origin and loss of captured hydrogen envelopes from protoplanets between `sub-Earth'-like bodies of 0.1$M_{\oplus}$ up to `super-Earths' with 5$M_{\oplus}$ in the HZ of a Sun like G star, assuming their rocky cores had formed before the nebula dissipated. We model the gravitational accumulation of nebula gas around a core as a function of protoplanetary luminosity during accretion and calculate the resulting surface temperature by solving the hydrostatic structure equations for the protoplanetary nebula. Depending on nebular properties and resulting luminosities, for planetary bodies of 0.1--1$M_{\oplus}$ we obtain hydrogen envelopes with masses between $\sim 2.5\times 10^{19}$--$1.5\times 10^{26}$ g. For `super-Earths' with masses between 2--5$M_{\oplus}$ hydrogen envelopes within the mass range of $\sim 7.5\times 10^{23}$--$1.5\times 10^{28}$ g can be captured. To study the escape of these hydrogen-dominated protoatmospheres, we apply a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model and calculate the loss rates due to the heating by the high XUV flux of the young star. Our results indicate that under most nebula conditions `sub-Earth' and Earth-mass planets can lose their envelopes by thermal escape during the first $100$ Myr after the disk dissipated. However, if a nebula has a low dust depletion factor or low accretion rates resulting in low protoplanetary luminosities, it is possible that even protoplanets with Earth-mass cores may keep their hydrogen envelopes during their whole lifetime. In contrast to lower mass protoplanets, `super-Earths' accumulate a huge amount of nebula gas and lose only tiny fractions of their primordial envelopes. Our results agree with the fact that Venus, Earth, and Mars are not surrounded by dense hydrogen envelopes, as well as with the recent discoveries of low density `super-Earths' that most likely could not get rid of their protoatmospheres.
  • Latest research in planet formation indicate that Mars formed within a few million years (Myr) and remained a planetary embryo that never grew to a more massive planet. It can also be expected from dynamical models, that most of Mars' building blocks consisted of material that formed in orbital locations just beyond the ice line which could have contained ~0.1-0.2 wt. % of H2O. By using these constraints, we estimate the nebula-captured and catastrophically outgassed volatile contents during the solidification of Mars' magma ocean and apply a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model for the study of the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) driven thermal escape of the martian protoatmosphere during the early active epoch of the young Sun. The amount of gas that has been captured from the protoplanetary disk into the planetary atmosphere is calculated by solving the hydrostatic structure equations in the protoplanetary nebula. Depending on nebular properties such as the dust grain depletion factor, planetesimal accretion rates and luminosities, hydrogen envelopes with masses >=3x10^{19} g to <=6.5x10^{22} g could have been captured from the nebula around early Mars. Depending of the before mentioned parameters, due to the planets low gravity and a solar XUV flux that was ~100 times stronger compared to the present value, our results indicate that early Mars would have lost its nebular captured hydrogen envelope after the nebula gas evaporated, during a fast period of ~0.1-7.5 Myr. After the solidification of early Mars' magma ocean, catastrophically outgassed volatiles with the amount of ~50-250 bar H2O and ~10-55 bar CO2 could have been lost during ~0.4-12 Myr, if the impact related energy flux of large planetesimals and small embryos to the planet's surface lasted long enough, that the steam atmosphere could have been prevented from condensing. If this was not the case... (continued)
  • The recently discovered low-density "super-Earths" Kepler-11b, Kepler-11f, Kepler-11d, Kepler-11e, and planets such as GJ 1214b represent most likely planets which are surrounded by dense H/He envelopes or contain deep H2O oceans also surrounded by dense hydrogen envelopes. Although these "super-Earths" are orbiting relatively close to their host stars, they have not lost their captured nebula-based hydrogen-rich or degassed volatile-rich steam protoatmospheres. Thus it is interesting to estimate the maximum possible amount of atmospheric hydrogen loss from a terrestrial planet orbiting within the habitable zone of late main sequence host stars. For studying the thermosphere structure and escape we apply a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model which solves the equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation for a planet with the mass and size of the Earth and for a "super-Earth" with a size of 2 R_Earth and a mass of 10 M_Earth. We calculate volume heating rates by the stellar soft X-ray and EUV radiation and expansion of the upper atmosphere, its temperature, density and velocity structure and related thermal escape rates during planet's life time. Moreover, we investigate under which conditions both planets enter the blow-off escape regime and may therefore experience loss rates which are close to the energy-limited escape. Finally we discuss the results in the context of atmospheric evolution and implications for habitability of terrestrial planets in general.
  • We study the interactions between the stellar wind plasma flow of a typical M star, such as GJ 436, and hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of an Earth-like planet and a "super-Earth" with the radius of 2 R_Earth and a mass of 10 M_Earth, located within the habitable zone at ~0.24 AU. We investigate the formation of extended atomic hydrogen coronae under the influences of the stellar XUV flux (soft X-rays and EUV), stellar wind density and velocity, shape of a planetary obstacle (e.g., magnetosphere, ionopause), and the loss of planetary pick-up ions on the evolution of hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres. Stellar XUV fluxes which are 1, 10, 50 and 100 times higher compared to that of the present-day Sun are considered and the formation of high-energy neutral hydrogen clouds around the planets due to the charge-exchange reaction under various stellar conditions have been modeled. Charge-exchange between stellar wind protons with planetary hydrogen atoms, and photoionization, leads to the production of initially cold ions of planetary origin. We found that the ion production rates for the studied planets can vary over a wide range, from ~1.0x10^{25} s^{-1} to ~5.3x10^{30} s^{-1}, depending on the stellar wind conditions and the assumed XUV exposure of the upper atmosphere. Our findings indicate that most likely the majority of these planetary ions are picked up by the stellar wind and lost from the planet. Finally, we estimate the long-time non-thermal ion pick-up escape for the studied planets and compare them with the thermal escape. According to our estimates, non-thermal escape of picked up ionized hydrogen atoms over a planet's lifetime varies between ~0.4 Earth ocean equivalent amounts of hydrogen (EO_H) to <3 EO_H and usually is several times smaller in comparison to the thermal atmospheric escape rates.
  • The discovery of transiting "super-Earths" with inflated radii and known masses such as Kepler-11b-f, GJ 1214b and 55 Cnc e, indicates that these exoplanets did not lose their nebula-captured hydrogen-rich, degassed or impact-delivered protoatmospheres by atmospheric escape processes. Because hydrodynamic blow-off of atmospheric hydrogen atoms is the most efficient atmospheric escape process we apply a time-dependent numerical algorithm which is able to solve the system of 1-D fluid equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation to investigate the criteria under which "super-Earths" with hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres can experience hydrodynamic expansion by heating of the stellar XUV (soft X-rays and extreme ultraviolet) radiation and thermal escape via blow-off. Depending on orbit location, XUV flux, heating efficiency and the planet's mean density our results indicate that the upper atmospheres of all "super-Earths" can expand to large distances, so that besides of Kepler-11c all of them experience atmospheric mass-loss due to Roche lobe overflow. The atmospheric mass-loss of the studied "super-Earths" is one to two orders of magnitude lower compared to that of "hot Jupiters" such as HD 209458b, so that one can expect that these exoplanets cannot lose their hydrogen-envelopes during their remaining lifetimes.
  • We present a new observational campaign, DWARF, aimed at detection of circumbinary extrasolar planets using the timing of the minima of low-mass eclipsing binaries. The observations will be performed within an extensive network of relatively small to medium-size telescopes with apertures of ~20-200 cm. The starting sample of the objects to be monitored contains (i) low-mass eclipsing binaries with M and K components, (ii) short-period binaries with sdB or sdO component, and (iii) post-common-envelope systems containing a WD, which enable to determine minima with high precision. Since the amplitude of the timing signal increases with the orbital period of an invisible third component, the timescale of project is long, at least 5-10 years. The paper gives simple formulas to estimate suitability of individual eclipsing binaries for the circumbinary planet detection. Intrinsic variability of the binaries (photospheric spots, flares, pulsation etc.) limiting the accuracy of the minima timing is also discussed. The manuscript also describes the best observing strategy and methods to detect cyclic timing variability in the minima times indicating presence of circumbinary planets. First test observation of the selected targets are presented.
  • Rapidly rotating stars show short-period oscillations in magnetic activity and polar appearance of starspots. The aim of this paper is to study large-scale shallow water waves in the tachoclines of rapidly rotating stars and their connection to the periodicity and the formation of starspots at high latitudes. Shallow-water magnetohydrodynamic equations were used to study the dynamics of large-scale waves at the rapidly rotating stellar tachoclines in the presence of toroidal magnetic field. Dispersion relations and latitudinal distribution of wave modes were derived. We found that low-frequency magnetic Rossby waves tend to be located at poles, but high-frequency magnetic Poincare waves are concentrated near the equator in rapidly rotating stars. These results have important implications for the evolution of the stellar wind in young Sun-like stars. Unstable magnetic Rossby waves may lead to the local enhancement of magnetic flux at high latitudes of tachoclines in rapidly rotating stars. The enhanced magnetic flux may rise upwards owing to the magnetic buoyancy in the form of tubes and appear as starspots at polar regions. Magnetic Rossby waves may also cause observed short-term periodicity in the stellar magnetic activity.
  • In this paper we present and discuss the criteria for selecting potential target stars suitable for the search for Earth like planets, with a special emphasis on the stellar aspects of habitability. Missions that search for terrestrial exoplanets will explore the presence and habitability of Earth-like exoplanets around several hundred nearby stars, mainly F, G, K, and M stars. The evaluation of the list of potential target systems in order to develop mission concepts for a search for Terrestrial Exoplanets is essential. Using the Darwin All Sky Star Catalogue (DASSC), we discuss the selection criteria, configuration dependent sub-catalogues and the implication of stellar activity for habitability.