• IGR J06074+2205 is a poorly studied X-ray source with a Be star companion. It has been proposed to belong to the group of Be/X-ray binaries. In Be/X-ray binaries, accretion onto the neutron star occurs via the transfer of material from the Be star's circumstellar disk. Thus, in the absence of the disk, no X-ray should be detected. The main goal of this work is to study the quiescent X-ray emission of IGR J06074+2205 during a disk-loss episode. We show that at the time of the XMM-Newton observation the decretion disk around the Be star had vanished. Still, accretion appears as the source of energy that powers the high-energy radiation in IGR J06074+2205. We report the discovery of X-ray pulsations with a pulse period of 373.2 s and a pulse fraction of ~50%. The $0.4-12$ keV spectrum is well described by an absorbed power law and blackbody components with the best fitting parameters: $N_{\rm H}=(6.2\pm0.5) \times 10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$, $kT_{\rm bb}=1.16\pm0.03$ keV, and $\Gamma=1.5\pm0.1$ The absorbed X-ray luminosity is $L_{\rm X}=1.4 \times 10^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$ assuming a distance of 4.5 kpc. The detection of X-ray pulsations confirms the nature of IGR J06074+2205 as a Be/X-ray binary. We discuss various scenarios to explain the quiescent X-ray emission of this pulsar. We rule out cooling of the neutron star surface and magnetospheric emission and conclude that accretion is the most likely scenario. The origin of the accreted material remains an open question.
  • Multiwavelength monitoring of Be/X-ray binaries is crucial to understand the mechanisms producing their outbursts. H 1145-619 is one of these systems, which has recently displayed X-ray activity. We investigate the correlation between the optical emission and the X-ray activity to predict the occurrence of new X-ray outbursts from the inferred state of the circumstellar disc. We have performed a multiwavelength study of H 1145-619 from 1973 to 2017 and present here a global analysis of its variability over the last 40 years. We have used optical spectra from the SAAO, SMARTS and SALT telescopes and optical photometry from INTEGRAL/OMC and ASAS. We also used X-ray observations from INTEGRAL/JEM-X, and IBIS to generate the light curves and combined them with Swift/XRT to extract the X-ray spectra. In addition, we have compiled archival observations and measurements from the literature to complement these data. Comparing the evolution of the optical continuum emission with the Halpha line variability, we have identified three different patterns of optical variability: Global increases and decreases of the optical brightness (observed from 1982 to 1994 and from 2009 to 2017) that can be explained by the dissipation and replenishment of the circumstellar disc, superorbital variations with a period of Psuperorb~590 days (observed in 2002-2009) which seems to be related with the circumstellar disc, and optical outbursts (observed in 1998-1999 and 2002-2005) that we interpret as mass ejections. We have discovered the presence of a retrograde one-armed density wave, which appeared in 2016 and is still present in the circumstellar disc. We have carried out the most complete long-term optical study of the Be/X-ray binary H 1145-619 in correlation with its X-ray activity. We found for the fist time the presence of a retrograde density perturbation in the circumstellar disc of a Be/X-ray binary.
  • The main goal of this work is to perform a detailed study of the optical variability of the Be/X-ray binary SAX J2239.3+6116. We obtained multi-colour BVRI photometry and polarimetry and 4000-7000 A spectroscopy. The optical counterpart to SAX J2239.3+6116 is a V=14.8 B0Ve star located at a distance of ~4.9 kpc. The interstellar reddening in the direction of the source is E(B-V)=1.70 mag. The monitoring of the Halpha line reveals a slow long-term decline of its equivalent width since 2001. The line profile is characterized by a stable double-peak profile with no indication of large-scale distortions. Although somewhat higher than predicted by the models, the optical polarization is consistent with electron scattering in the circumstellar disk. We attribute the long-term decrease in the intensity of the Halpha line to the dissipation of the circumstellar disk of the Be star. The longer variability timescales observed in SAX J2239.3+6116 compared to other Be/X-ray binaries may be explained by the wide orbit of the system.
  • We present average R-band optopolarimetric data, as well as variability parameters, from the first and second RoboPol observing season. We investigate whether gamma- ray--loud and gamma-ray--quiet blazars exhibit systematic differences in their optical polarization properties. We find that gamma-ray--loud blazars have a systematically higher polarization fraction (0.092) than gamma-ray--quiet blazars (0.031), with the hypothesis of the two samples being drawn from the same distribution of polarization fractions being rejected at the 3{\sigma} level. We have not found any evidence that this discrepancy is related to differences in the redshift distribution, rest-frame R-band lu- minosity density, or the source classification. The median polarization fraction versus synchrotron-peak-frequency plot shows an envelope implying that high synchrotron- peaked sources have a smaller range of median polarization fractions concentrated around lower values. Our gamma-ray--quiet sources show similar median polarization fractions although they are all low synchrotron-peaked. We also find that the random- ness of the polarization angle depends on the synchrotron peak frequency. For high synchrotron-peaked sources it tends to concentrate around preferred directions while for low synchrotron-peaked sources it is more variable and less likely to have a pre- ferred direction. We propose a scenario which mediates efficient particle acceleration in shocks and increases the helical B-field component immediately downstream of the shock.
  • The source 4U 1901+03 is a high-mass X-ray pulsar than went into outburst in 2003. Observation performed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer showed spectral and timing variability, including the detection of flares, quasi-periodic oscillations, complex changes in the pulse profiles, and pulse phase dependent spectral variability. We re-analysed the data covering the 2003 X-ray outburst and focused on several aspects of the variability that have not been discussed so far. These are the 10 keV feature and the X-ray spectral states and their association with accretion regimes, including the transit to the propeller state at the end of the outburst. We find that 4U 1901+03 went through three accretion regimes over the course of the X-ray outburst. At the peak of the outburst and for a very short time, the X-ray flux may have overcome the critical limit that marks the formation of a radiative shock at a certain distance above the neutron star surface. Most of the time, however, the source is in the subcritical regime. Only at the end of the outburst, when the luminosity decreased below ~10^{36} (d/10 kpc)^2 erg/s, did the source enter the propeller regime. Evidence for the existence of these regimes comes from the pulse profiles, the shape of the hardness-intensity diagram, and the correlation of various spectral parameters with the flux. The 10 keV feature appears to strongly depend on the X-ray flux and on the pulse phase, which opens the possibility to interpret this feature as a cyclotron line.
  • We present a new set of optical polarization plane rotations in blazars, observed during the third year of operation of RoboPol. The entire set of rotation events discovered during three years of observations is analysed with the aim of determining whether these events are inherent in all blazars. It is found that the frequency of the polarization plane rotations varies widely among blazars. This variation cannot be explained either by a difference in the relativistic boosting or by selection effects caused by a difference in the average fractional polarization. We conclude that the rotations are characteristic of a subset of blazars and that they occur as a consequence of their intrinsic properties.
  • The stages before the formation of stars in molecular clouds are poorly understood. Insights can be gained by studying the properties of quiescent clouds, such as their magnetic field structure. The plane-of-the-sky orientation of the field can be traced by polarized starlight. We present the first extended, wide-field ($\sim$10 $\rm deg^2$) map of the Polaris Flare cloud in dust-absorption induced optical polarization of background stars, using the RoboPol polarimeter at the Skinakas Observatory. This is the first application of the wide-field imaging capabilities of RoboPol. The data were taken in the R-band and analysed with the automated reduction pipeline of the instrument. We present in detail optimizations in the reduction pipeline specific to wide-field observations. Our analysis resulted in reliable measurements of 641 stars with median fractional linear polarization 1.3%. The projected magnetic field shows a large scale ordered pattern. At high longitudes it appears to align with faint striations seen in the Herschel-SPIRE map of dust emission (250 $\mu m$), while in the central 4-5 deg$^2$ it shows an eddy-like feature. The overall polarization pattern we obtain is in good agreement with large scale measurements by Planck of the dust emission polarization in the same area of the sky.
  • Neutron star X-ray binaries emit a compact, optically thick, relativistic radio jet during low-luminosity, usually hard states, as Galactic black-hole X-ray binaries do. When radio emission is bright, a hard power-law tail without evidence for an exponential cutoff is observed in most systems. We have developed a jet model that explains many spectral and timing properties of black-hole binaries in the states where a jet is present. Our goal is to investigate whether our jet model can reproduce the hard tail, with the correct range of photon index and the absence of a high-energy cutoff, in neutron-star X-ray binaries. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Compton upscattering of soft, accretion-disk or boundary layer photons, in the jet and computed the emergent energy spectra, as well as the time lag of hard photons with respect to softer ones as a function of Fourier frequency. We demonstrate that our jet model explains the observed power-law distribution with photon index in the range 1.8-3. With an appropriate choice of the parameters, the cutoff expected from Comptonization is shifted to energies above ~300 keV, producing a pure power law without any evidence for a rollover, in agreement with the observations. Our results reinforce the idea that the link between the outflow (jet) and inflow (disk) in X-ray binaries does not depend on the nature of the compact object, but on the process of accretion. Furthermore, we address the differences of jets in black-hole and neutron-star X-ray binaries and predict that the break frequency in the spectral energy distribution of neutron-star X-ray binaries, as a class, will be lower than that of black-hole binaries.
  • We present the results of our monitoring program to study the long-term variability of the Halpha line in high-mass X-ray binaries. We have carried out the most complete optical spectroscopic study of the global properties of high-mass X-ray binaries so far with the analysis of more than 1100 spectra of 20 sources. Our aim is to characterise the optical variability timescales and study the interaction between the neutron star and the accreting material. Our results can be summarised as follows: i) we find that Be/X-ray binaries with narrow orbits are more variable than systems with long orbital periods, ii) we show that a Keplerian distribution of the gas particles provides a good description of the disks in Be/X-ray binaries, as it does in classical Be stars, iii) a decrease in the Halpha equivalent width is generally observed after major X-ray outbursts, iv) we confirm that the Halpha equivalent width correlates with disk radius, v) while systems with supergiant companions display, multi-structured profiles, most of the Be/X-ray binaries show at some epoch double-peak asymmetric profiles, indicating that density inhomogeneities is a common property in the disk of Be/X-ray binaries, vi) the profile variability (V/R ratio) timescales are shorter and the Halpha equivalent width are smaller in Be/X-ray binaries than in isolated Be stars, and vii) we provide new evidence that the disk in Be/X-ray binaries is on average denser than in classical Be stars.
  • We present first results on polarization swings in optical emission of blazars obtained by RoboPol, a monitoring program of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray bright blazars specially designed for effective detection of such events. A possible connection of polarization swing events with periods of high activity in gamma rays is investigated using the dataset obtained during the first season of operation. It was found that the brightest gamma-ray flares tend to be located closer in time to rotation events, which may be an indication of two separate mechanisms responsible for the rotations. Blazars with detected rotations have significantly larger amplitude and faster variations of polarization angle in optical than blazars without rotations. Our simulations show that the full set of observed rotations is not a likely outcome (probability $\le 1.5 \times 10^{-2}$) of a random walk of the polarization vector simulated by a multicell model. Furthermore, it is highly unlikely ($\sim 5 \times 10^{-5}$) that none of our rotations is physically connected with an increase in gamma-ray activity.
  • We present measurements of rotations of the optical polarization of blazars during the second year of operation of RoboPol, a monitoring programme of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray bright blazars specially designed for effective detection of such events, and we analyse the large set of rotation events discovered in two years of observation. We investigate patterns of variability in the polarization parameters and total flux density during the rotation events and compare them to the behaviour in a non-rotating state. We have searched for possible correlations between average parameters of the polarization-plane rotations and average parameters of polarization, with the following results: (1) there is no statistical association of the rotations with contemporaneous optical flares; (2) the average fractional polarization during the rotations tends to be lower than that in a non-rotating state; (3) the average fractional polarization during rotations is correlated with the rotation rate of the polarization plane in the jet rest frame; (4) it is likely that distributions of amplitudes and durations of the rotations have physical upper bounds, so arbitrarily long rotations are not realised in nature.
  • Galactic black-hole X-ray binaries emit a compact, optically thick, mildy relativistic radio jet when they are in the hard and hard-intermediate states. In a series of papers, we have developed a jet model and have shown, through Monte Carlo simulations, that our model can explain many observational results. In this work, we investigate one more constraining relationship between the cutoff energy and the phase lag during the early stages of an X-ray outburst of the black-hole X-ray binary GX 339-4: the cutoff energy decreases while the phase lag increases during the brightening of the hard state. We demonstrate that our jet model naturally explains the above correlation, with a minor modification consisting of introducing an acceleration zone at the base of the jet. The observed correlation between the cutoff energy and the phase lag suggests that the lags are produced by the hard component. Here we show that this correlation arises naturally if Comptonization in the jet produces these two quantities.
  • This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of high-mass X-ray binaries and ultra-luminous X-ray sources. For a summary, we refer to the paper.
  • We present photometric observations of the field around the optical counterparts of high-mass X-ray binaries. Our aim is to study the long-term photometric variability in correlation with their X-ray activity and derive a set of secondary standard stars that can be used for time series analysis. We find that the donors in Be/X-ray binaries exhibit larger amplitude changes in the magnitudes and colours than those hosting a supergiant companion. The amplitude of variability increases with wavelength in Be/X-ray binaries and remains fairly constant in supergiant systems. When time scales of years are considered, a good correlation between the X-ray and optical variability is observed. The X-rays cease when optical brightness decreases. These results reflect the fact that the circumstellar disk in Be/X-ray binaries is the main source of both optical and X-ray variability. We also derive the colour excess, E(B-V), selecting data at times when the contribution of the circumstellar disk was supposed to be at minimum, and we revisit the distance estimates.
  • Polarization in classical Be stars results from Thomson scattering of the unpolarized light from the Be star in the circumstellar disc. Theory and observations agree that the maximum degree of polarization from isolated Be stars is < 4%. We report on the first optical polarimetric observations of the Be/X-ray binary EXO\,2030+375. We find that the optical (R band) light is strongly linearly polarized with a degee of polarization of 19%, the highest ever measured either in a classical or Be/X-ray binary. We argue that the interstellar medium cannot account for this high polarization degree and that a substantial amount must be intrinsic to the source. We propose that it may result from the alignment of non-spherical ferromagnetic grains in the Be star disc due to the strong neutron star magnetic field.
  • We report the polarized optical light curve of a gamma-ray burst afterglow obtained using the RoboPol instrument. Observations began 655 seconds after the initial burst of gamma-rays from GRB131030A, and continued uninterrupted for 2 hours. The afterglow displayed a low, constant fractional linear polarization of $p = (2.1 \pm 1.6)\,\%$ throughout, which is similar to the interstellar polarization measured on nearby stars. The optical brightness decay is consistent with a forward-shock propagating in a medium of constant density, and the low polarization fraction indicates a disordered magnetic field in the shock front. This supports the idea that the magnetic field is amplified by plasma instabilities on the shock front. These plasma instabilities produce strong magnetic fields with random directions on scales much smaller than the total observable region of the shock, and the resulting randomly-oriented polarization vectors sum to produce a low net polarization over the total observable region of the shock.
  • We present an X-ray timing and spectral analysis of the Be/X-ray binary SAX J2103.5+4545 at a time when the Be star's circumstellar disk had disappeared and thus the main reservoir of material available for accretion had extinguished. In this very low optical state, pulsed X-ray emission was detected at a level of L_X~10^{33} erg/s. This is the lowest luminosity at which pulsations have ever been detected in an accreting pulsar. The derived spin period is 351.13 s, consistent with previous observations. The source continues its overall long-term spin-up, which reduced the spin period by 7.5 s since its discovery in 1997. The X-ray emission is consistent with a purely thermal spectrum, represented by a blackbody with kT=1 keV. We discuss possible scenarios to explain the observed quiescent luminosity and conclude that the most likely mechanism is direct emission resulting from the cooling of the polar caps, heated either during the most recent outburst or via intermittent accretion in quiescence.
  • We present first results from RoboPol, a novel-design optical polarimeter operating at the Skinakas Observatory in Crete. The data, taken during the May - June 2013 commissioning of the instrument, constitute a single-epoch linear polarization survey of a sample of gamma-ray - loud blazars, defined according to unbiased and objective selection criteria, easily reproducible in simulations, as well as a comparison sample of, otherwise similar, gamma-ray - quiet blazars. As such, the results of this survey are appropriate for both phenomenological population studies and for tests of theoretical population models. We have measured polarization fractions as low as $0.015$ down to $R$ magnitude of 17 and as low as $0.035$ down to 18 magnitude. The hypothesis that the polarization fractions of gamma-ray - loud and gamma-ray - quiet blazars are drawn from the same distribution is rejected at the $10^{-3}$ level. We therefore conclude that gamma-ray - loud and gamma-ray - quiet sources have different optical polarization properties. This is the first time this statistical difference is demonstrated in optical wavelengths. The polarization fraction distributions of both samples are well-described by exponential distributions with averages of $\langle p \rangle =6.4 ^{+0.9}_{-0.8}\times 10^{-2}$ for gamma-ray--loud blazars, and $\langle p \rangle =3.2 ^{+2.0}_{-1.1}\times 10^{-2}$ for gamma-ray--quiet blazars. The most probable value for the difference of the means is $3.4^{+1.5}_{-2.0}\times 10^{-2}$. The distribution of polarization angles is statistically consistent with being uniform.
  • We report on the discovery of X-ray pulsations in the Be/X-ray binary IGR J21343+4738 during an XMM-Newton observation. We obtained a barycentric corrected pulse period of 320.35+-0.06 seconds. The pulse profile displays a peak at low energy that flattens at high energy. The pulse fraction is 45+-3$% and independent of energy within the statistical uncertainties. The 0.2-12 keV spectrum is well fit by a two component model consisting of a blackbody with kT=0.11+-0.01 keV and a power law with photon index Gamma=1.02+-0.07. Both components are affected by photoelectric absorption with a equivalent hydrogen column density NH=(1.08+-0.15)x 10^{22} cm^{-2} The observed unabsorbed flux is 1.4x10^{-11} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} in the 0.2-12 keV energy band. Despite the fact that the Be star's circumstellar disc has almost vanished, accretion continues to be the main source of high energy radiation. We argue that the observed X-ray luminosity (LX~10^{35} erg s^{-1}) may result from accretion via a low-velocity equatorial wind from the optical companion.
  • We describe the data reduction pipeline and control system for the RoboPol project. The RoboPol project is monitoring the optical $R$-band magnitude and linear polarization of a large sample of active galactic nuclei that is dominated by blazars. The pipeline calibrates and reduces each exposure frame, producing a measurement of the magnitude and linear polarization of every source in the $13'\times 13'$ field of view. The control system combines a dynamic scheduler, real-time data reduction, and telescope automation to allow high-efficiency unassisted observations.
  • The main goal of this work is to determine the properties of the optical counterpart to the INTEGRAL source IGR J21343+4738, and study its long-term optical variability. We present optical photometric BVRI and spectroscopic observations covering the wavelength band 4000-7500 A. We find that the optical counterpart to IGR J21343+4738 is a V=14.1 B1IVe shell star located at a distance of ~8.5 kpc. The Halpha line changed from an absorption dominated profile to an emission dominated profile, and then back again into absorption. In addition, fast V/R asymmetries were observed once the disc developed. Although the Balmer lines are the most strongly affected by shell absorption, we find that shell characteristics are also observed in He I lines. The optical spectral variability of IGR J21343+4738 is attributed to the formation of an equatorial disc around the Be star and the development of an enhanced density perturbation that revolves inside the disc. We have witnessed the formation and dissipation of the circumstellar disc. The strong shell profile of the Halpha and He I lines and the fact that no transition from shell phase to a pure emission phase is seen imply that we are seeing the system near edge-on.
  • We have analysed RXTE archival data to study the aperiodic variability of the black-hole binary GRO J1655-40 during the hard state of the 2005 outburst. We computed the 0.008-64 Hz power spectral density during the rise and decay of the 2005 outburst, and we found that they were reasonably well modelled by the sum of two, broad Lorenztian functions in most cases (plus a narrow QPO) which correspond to three different variability components. Our aim is to study the evolution of the timing properties of the source during the outburst, by studying the correlation between the characteristics of the broad-band noise components in the power spectra and the source luminosity. Our results suggest that the whole power spectrum shifts to high (low) frequencies as the source luminosity increases (decreases), in agreement with previous studies of other black hole binaries. However, we also detect a strong "hysteresis" pattern in the "frequency-luminosity" plots, and show that the "critical" luminosity limit, above which the timing properties of the source change, is different during the rise and the decay phase of the outburst. We discuss the general implications of these results in the context of the truncated disc model.
  • In the last quarter of a century, a unified characterization of the spectral evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries, both containing a neutron star and a black hole, was possible. In this context, the notion of source states characterizing the X-ray emission from black-hole binaries and neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries revealed to be a very useful tool to disentangle the complex spectral and aperiodic phenomenology displayed by those classes of accreting objects. Be/X-ray binaries constitute another major class of transient accreting binaries, for which very little work has been done on the correlated timing and spectral variability. Especially, no definition of source states exists for this class, in spite of their highly variable X-ray emission. When active, Be/X-ray binaries are among the brightest objects in the X-ray sky and are characterized by dramatic variability in brightness on timescales ranging from seconds to years. It is then worth it to ask whether a definition of spectral states is possible for these systems. In this work, we try to address such a question, investigating whether accreting X-ray pulsars display source states and characterizing those states through their spectral properties. Our results show that Be/X-ray pulsars trace two different branches in their hardness-intensity diagram: the horizontal branch, a low-intensity state, and the diagonal branch, a high-intensity state that only appears when the X-ray luminosity exceeds a critical limit. We propose that the two branches are the phenomenological signature of two different accretion modes -- in agreement with recently proposed models -- depending on whether the luminosity of the source is above or below a critical value.
  • The X-ray transient MXB 0656-072 is a poorly studied member of high-mass X-ray binaries. Based on the transient nature of the X-ray emission, the detection of pulsations, and the early-type companion, it has been classified as a Be X-ray binary (Be/XRB). However, the flaring activity covering a large fraction of a giant outburst is somehow peculiar. Our goal is to investigate the multiwavelength variability of the high-mass X-ray binary MXB 0656-072. We carried out optical spectroscopy and analysed all RXTE archive data, performing a detailed X-ray-colour, spectral, and timing analysis of both normal (type-I) and giant (type-II) outbursts from MXB 0656-072 This is the first detailed analysis of the optical counterpart in the classification region (4000-5000 A). From the strength and ratio of the elements and ions, we derive an O9.5Ve spectral type, in agreement with previous classification. This confirms its Be nature. The characterisation of the Be/XRB system relies on Balmer lines in emission in the optical spectra, long-term X-ray variability, and the orbital period vs. spin period and EW(H\alpha) relation. The peculiar feature that distinguishes the type-II outburst is flaring activity, which occurs during the whole outburst peak, before a smoother decay. We interpret it in terms of magneto-hydrodynamic instability. Colour and spectral analysis reveal a hardening of the spectrum as the flux increases. We explored the aperiodic X-ray variability of the system for the first time, finding a correlation of the central frequency and rms of the main timing component with luminosity, which extends up to a "saturation" flux of 1E-8 erg/cm^2/s. A correlation between timing and spectral parameters was also found, pointing to an interconnection between the two physical regions responsible for both phenomenologies.
  • M. Feroci, J.W. den Herder, E. Bozzo, D. Barret, S. Brandt, M. Hernanz, M. van der Klis, M. Pohl, A. Santangelo, L. Stella, A. Watts, J. Wilms, S. Zane, M. Ahangarianabhari, A. Alpar, D. Altamirano, L. Alvarez, L. Amati, C. Amoros, N. Andersson, A. Antonelli, A. Argan, R. Artigue, P. Azzarello, G. Baldazzi, S. Balman, M. Barbera, T. Belloni, G. Bertuccio, S. Bianchi, A. Bianchini, P. Bodin, J.-M. Bonnet Bidaud, S. Boutloukos, J. Braga, E. Brown, N. Bucciantini, L. Burderi, M. Bursa, C. Budtz-Jørgensen, E. Cackett, F.R. Cadoux, P. Cais, G.A. Caliandro, R. Campana, S. Campana, P. Casella, D. Chakrabarty, J. Chenevez, J. Coker, R. Cole, A. Collura, T. Courvoisier, A. Cros, A. Cumming, G. Cusumano, A. D'Aì, V. D'Elia, E. Del Monte, D. De Martino, A. De Rosa, S. Di Cosimo, S. Diebold, T. Di Salvo, I. Donnarumma, A. Drago, M. Durant, D. Emmanoulopoulos, Y. Evangelista, A. Fabian, M. Falanga, Y. Favre, C. Feldman, C. Ferrigno, M. H. Finger, G.W. Fraser, F. Fuschino, D.K. Galloway, J.L. Galvez Sanchez, E. Garcia-Berro, B. Gendre, S. Gezari, A.B. Giles, M. Gilfanov, P. Giommi, G. Giovannini, M. Giroletti, A. Goldwurm, D. Götz, C. Gouiffes, M. Grassi, P. Groot C. Guidorzi, D. Haas, F. Hansen, D.H. Hartmann, C.A. Haswe, A. Heger, J. Homan, A. Hornstrup, R. Hudec, J. Huovelin, A. Ingram, J.J.M. in't Zand, J.Isern, G. Israe, L. Izzo, P. Jonker, P. Kaaret, V. Karas, D. Karelin, D. Kataria, L. Keek, T. Kennedy, D. Klochkov, W. Kluzniak, K. Kokkotas, S. Korpela, C. Kouveliotou, I. Kreykenbohm, L.M. Kuiper, I. Kuvvetli, C. Labanti, D. Lai, F.K. Lamb, F. Lebrun, D. Lin, D. Linder, G. Lodato, F. Longo, N. Lund, T.J. Maccarone, D. Macera, D. Maier, P. Malcovati, V. Mangano, A. Manousakis, M. Marisaldi, A. Markowitz, A. Martindale, G. Matt, I.M. McHardy, A. Melatos, M. Mendez, S. Migliari, R. Mignani, M.C. Miller, J.M. Miller, T. Mineo, G. Miniutti, S. Morsink, C. Motch, S. Motta, M. Mouchet, F. Muleri, A.J. Norton, M. Nowak, P. O'Brien, M. Orienti, M. Orio, M. Orlandini, P. Orleanski, J.P. Osborne, R. Osten, F. Ozel, L. Pacciani, A. Papitto, B. Paul, E. Perinati, V. Petracek, J. Portell, J. Poutanen, D. Psaltis, D. Rambaud, G. Ramsay, M. Rapisarda, A. Rachevski, P.S. Ray, N. Rea, S. Reddy, P. Reig, M. Reina Aranda, R. Remillard, C. Reynolds, P. Rodríguez-Gil, J. Rodriguez, P. Romano, E.M.R. Rossi, F. Ryde, L. Sabau-Graziati, G. Sala, R. Salvaterra, A. Sanna, S. Schanne, J. Schee, C. Schmid, A. Schwenk, A.D. Schwope, J.-Y. Seyler, A. Shearer, A. Smith, D.M. Smith, P.J. Smith, V. Sochora, P. Soffitta, P. Soleri, B. Stappers, B. Stelzer, N. Stergioulas, G. Stratta, T.E. Strohmayer, Z. Stuchlik, S. Suchy, V. Sulemainov, T. Takahashi, F. Tamburini, C. Tenzer, L. Tolos, G. Torok, J.M. Torrejon, D.F. Torres, A. Tramacere, A. Trois, S. Turriziani, P. Uter, P. Uttley, A. Vacchi, P. Varniere, S. Vaughan, S. Vercellone, V. Vrba, D. Walton, S. Watanabe, R. Wawrzaszek, N. Webb, N. Weinberg, H. Wende, P. Wheatley, R. Wijers, R. Wijnands, M. Wille, C.A. Wilson-Hodge, B. Winter, K. Wood, G. Zampa, N. Zampa, L. Zampieri, A. Zdziarski, B. Zhang
    Sept. 7, 2012 astro-ph.IM
    The LOFT mission concept is one of four candidates selected by ESA for the M3 launch opportunity as Medium Size missions of the Cosmic Vision programme. The launch window is currently planned for between 2022 and 2024. LOFT is designed to exploit the diagnostics of rapid X-ray flux and spectral variability that directly probe the motion of matter down to distances very close to black holes and neutron stars, as well as the physical state of ultra-dense matter. These primary science goals will be addressed by a payload composed of a Large Area Detector (LAD) and a Wide Field Monitor (WFM). The LAD is a collimated (<1 degree field of view) experiment operating in the energy range 2-50 keV, with a 10 m^2 peak effective area and an energy resolution of 260 eV at 6 keV. The WFM will operate in the same energy range as the LAD, enabling simultaneous monitoring of a few-steradian wide field of view, with an angular resolution of <5 arcmin. The LAD and WFM experiments will allow us to investigate variability from submillisecond QPO's to year-long transient outbursts. In this paper we report the current status of the project.