• Iron-based chalcogenides are complex superconducting systems in which orbitally-dependent electronic correlations play an important role. Here, using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we investigate the effect of these electronic correlations outside the nematic phase in the tetragonal phase of superconducting FeSe1-xSx (x = 0; 0:18; 1). With increasing sulfur substitution, the Fermi velocities increase significantly and the band renormalizations are suppressed towards a factor of 1.5-2 for FeS. Furthermore, the chemical pressure leads to an increase in the size of the quasi-two dimensional Fermi surface, compared with that of FeSe, however, it remains smaller than the predicted one from first principle calculations for FeS. Our results show that the isoelectronic substitution is an effective way to tune electronic correlations in FeSe1-xSx, being weakened for FeS with a lower superconducting transition temperature. This suggests indirectly that electronic correlations could help to promote higher-Tc superconductivity in FeSe.
  • We investigate the evolution of the Fermi surfaces and electronic interactions across the nematic phase transition in single crystals of FeSe1-xSx using Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in high magnetic fields up to 45 tesla in the low temperature regime. The unusually small and strongly elongated Fermi surface of FeSe increases monotonically with chemical pressure, x, due to the suppression of the in-plane anisotropy except for the smallest orbit which suffers a Lifshitz-like transition once nematicity disappears. Even outside the nematic phase the Fermi surface continues to increase, in stark contrast to the reconstructed Fermi surface detected in FeSe under applied external pressure. We detect signatures of orbital-dependent quasiparticle mass renomalization suppressed for those orbits with dominant dxz=yz character, but unusually enhanced for those orbits with dominant dxy character. The lack of enhanced superconductivity outside the nematic phase in FeSe1-xSx suggest that nematicity may not play the essential role in enhancing Tc in these systems.
  • One of the early triumphs of quantum physics is the explanation why some materials are metallic whereas others are insulating. While a treatment based on single electron states correctly predicts the character of most materials this approach can fail spectacularly, when the electrostatic repulsion between electrons causes strong correlations. Not only can these favor new and subtle forms of order in metals, such as magnetism or superconductivity, they can even cause the electrons in a half-filled energy band to lock into position altogether, producing a correlated, or Mott insulator. Arguably the most extreme manifestation of electronic correlations in dense electronic matter, the transition into the Mott insulating state raises a number of fundamental questions. Foremost among these is the fate of the electronic Fermi surface and the associated charge carrier mass, as the Mott transition is approached at low temperature, which have been particularly controversial in the high temperature superconducting cuprates. We report the first direct observation of the Fermi surface on the metallic side of a Mott insulating transition by high pressure quantum oscillatory measurements in NiS2. Our results point at a large Fermi surface consistent with Luttinger's theorem and a strongly enhanced carrier effective mass, suggesting that electron localization occurs via a diverging effective mass and concomitant slowing down of charge carriers as predicted theoretically.
  • We report the pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature, $T_c$, in TlNi$_2$Se$_{2-x}$S$_x$ detected via the AC susceptibility method. The pressure-temperature phase diagram constructed for TlNi$_{2}$Se$_{2}$, TlNi$_{2}$S$_{2}$ and TlNi$_{2}$SeS exhibits two unexpected features: (a) a sudden collapse of the superconducting state at moderate pressure for all three compositions and (b) a dome-shaped pressure dependence of $T_c$ for TlNi$_{2}$SeS. These results point to the nontrivial role of S substitution and its subtle interplay with applied pressure, as well as novel superconducting properties of the TlNi$_2$Se$_{2-x}$S$_x$ system.
  • We report near-field scanning optical imaging with an active tip made of a single fluorescent CdSe nanocrystal attached at the apex of an optical tip. Although the images are acquired only partially because of the random blinking of the semiconductor particle, our work validates the use of such tips in ultra-high spatial resolution optical microscopy.
  • We present a method to realize active optical tips for use in near-field optics that can operate at room temperature. A metal-coated optical tip is covered with a thin polymer layer stained with CdSe nanocrystals or nanorods at low density. The time analysis of the emission rate and emission spectra of the active tips reveal that a very small number of particles - possibly down to only one - can be made active at the tip apex. This opens the way to near-field optics with a single inorganic nanoparticle as a light source.