• We use medium-band near-infrared (NIR) Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 photometry with model NIR spectra of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars to develop a new tool for efficiently distinguishing carbon-rich (C-type) AGB stars from oxygen-rich (M-type) AGB stars in galaxies at the edge of and outside the Local Group. We present the results of a test of this method on a region of the inner disk of M31, where we find a surprising lack of C stars, contrary to the findings of previous C star searches in other regions of M31. We find only 1 candidate C star (plus up to 6 additional, less certain C stars candidates), resulting in an extremely low ratio of C to M stars (C/M = (3.3(+20,-0.1))x10^-4) that is 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than other C/M estimates in M31. The low C/M ratio is likely due to the high metallicity in this region which impedes stars from achieving C/O > 1 in their atmospheres. These observations provide stringent constraints evolutionary models of metal-rich AGB stars and suggest that there is a metallicity threshold above which M stars are unable to make the transition to C stars, dramatically affecting AGB mass loss and dust production and, consequently, the observed global properties of metal-rich galaxies.
  • The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) is an on-going HST Multicycle Treasury program to image ~1/3 of M31's star forming disk in 6 filters, from the UV to the NIR. The full survey will resolve the galaxy into more than 100 million stars with projected radii from 0-20 kpc over a contiguous 0.5 square degree area in 828 orbits, producing imaging in the F275W and F336W filters with WFC3/UVIS, F475W and F814W with ACS/WFC, and F110W and F160W with WFC3/IR. The resulting wavelength coverage gives excellent constraints on stellar temperature, bolometric luminosity, and extinction for most spectral types. The photometry reaches SNR=4 at F275W=25.1, F336W=24.9, F475W=27.9, F814W=27.1, F110W=25.5, and F160W=24.6 for single pointings in the uncrowded outer disk; however, the optical and NIR data are crowding limited, and the deepest reliable magnitudes are up to 5 magnitudes brighter in the inner bulge. All pointings are dithered and produce Nyquist-sampled images in F475W, F814W, and F160W. We describe the observing strategy, photometry, astrometry, and data products, along with extensive tests of photometric stability, crowding errors, spatially-dependent photometric biases, and telescope pointing control. We report on initial fits to the structure of M31's disk, derived from the density of RGB stars, in a way that is independent of the assumed M/L and is robust to variations in dust extinction. These fits also show that the 10 kpc ring is not just a region of enhanced recent star formation, but is instead a dynamical structure containing a significant overdensity of stars with ages >1 Gyr. (Abridged)
  • Neutron stars contain matter in one of the densest forms found in the Universe. This feature, together with the unprecedented progress in observational astrophysics, makes such stars superb astrophysical laboratories for a broad range of exciting physical studies. This paper gives an overview of the phases of dense matter predicted to make their appearance in the cores of neutron stars. Particular emphasis is put on the role of strangeness. Net strangeness is carried by hyperons, K-mesons, H-dibaryons, and strange quark matter, and may leave its mark in the masses, radii, moment of inertia, dragging of local inertial frames, cooling behavior, surface composition, and the spin evolution of neutron stars. These observables play a key role for the exploration of the phase diagram of dense nuclear matter at high baryon number density but low temperature, which is not accessible to relativistic heavy ion collision experiments.
  • There has been much recent progress in our understanding of quark matter, culminating in the discovery that if such matter exists in the cores of neutron stars it ought to be in a color superconducting state. This paper explores the impact of superconducting quark matter on the properties (e.g., masses, radii, surface gravity, photon emission) of compact stars.
  • A forefront area of research concerns the exploration of the properties of hadronic matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density, and the determination of the equation of state--the relation between pressure, temperature and density--of such matter. Experimentally, relativistic heavy-ion collision experiments enable physicists to cast a brief glance at hot and ultra-dense matter for times as little as about $10^{-22}$ seconds. Complementary to this, the matter that exists in the cores of neutron stars, observed as radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars, and magnetars, is at low temperatures but compressed permanently to ultra-high densities that may be more than an order of magnitude higher than the density of atomic nuclei. This makes pulsars superb astrophysical laboratories for medium and high-energy nuclear physics, as discussed in this paper.