• Context: Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) binaries are surrounded by stable dusty and gaseous disks similar to the ones around young stellar objects. Whereas significant effort is spent on modeling observations of disks around young stellar objects, the disks around post-AGB binaries receive significantly less attention, even though they pose significant constraints on theories of disk physics and binary evolution. Aims: We want to examine the structure of and phenomena at play in circumbinary disks around post-AGB stars. We continue the analysis of our near-infrared interferometric image of the inner rim of the circumbinary disk around IRAS08544-4431. We want to understand the physics governing this inner disk rim. Methods: We use a radiative transfer model of a dusty disk to reproduce simultaneously the photometry as well as the near-infrared interferometric dataset on IRAS08544-4431. The model assumes hydrostatic equilibrium and takes dust settling self-consistently into account. Results: The best-fit radiative transfer model shows excellent agreement with the spectral energy distribution up to mm wavelengths as well as with the PIONIER visibility data. It requires a rounded inner rim structure, starting at a radius of 8.25 au. However, the model does not fully reproduce the detected over-resolved flux nor the azimuthal flux distribution of the inner rim. While the asymmetric inner disk rim structure is likely to be the consequence of disk-binary interactions, the origin of the additional over-resolved flux remains unclear. Conclusions: As in young stellar objects, the disk inner rim of IRAS08544-4431 is ruled by dust sublimation physics. Additional observations are needed to understand the origin of the extended flux and the azimuthal perturbation at the inner rim of the disk.
  • Aims. The magnetic star HD148937 is the only Galactic Of?p star surrounded by a nebula. The structure of this nebula is particularly complex and is composed, from the center out outwards, of a close bipolar ejecta nebula (NGC6164/5), an ellipsoidal wind-blown shell, and a spherically symmetric Stromgren sphere. The exact formation process of this nebula and its precise relation to the star's evolution remain unknown. Methods. We analyzed infrared Spitzer IRS and far-infrared Herschel/PACS observations of the NGC6164/5 nebula. The Herschel imaging allowed us to constrain the global morphology of the nebula. We also combined the infrared spectra with optical spectra of the central star to constrain its evolutionary status. We used these data to derive the abundances in the ejected material. To relate this information to the evolutionary status of the star, we also determined the fundamental parameters of HD148937 using the CMFGEN atmosphere code. Results. The H$\alpha$ image displays a bipolar or "8"-shaped ionized nebula, whilst the infrared images show dust to be more concentrated around the central object. We determine nebular abundance ratios of N/O = 1.06 close to the star, and N/O = 1.54 in the bright lobe constituting NGC6164. Interestingly, the parts of the nebula located further from HD148937 appear more enriched in stellar material than the part located closer to the star. Evolutionary tracks suggest that these ejecta have occured $\sim$1.2-1.3 and $\sim$0.6 Myrs ago, respectively. In addition, we derive abundances of argon for the nebula compatible with the solar values and we find a depletion of neon and sulfur. The combined analyses of the known kinematics and of the new abundances of the nebula suggest either a helical morphology for the nebula, possibly linked to the magnetic geometry, or the occurrence of a binary merger.
  • Gaia is a space mission currently measuring the five astrometric parameters as well as spectrophotometry of at least 1 billion stars to G = 20.7 mag with unprecedented precision. The sixth parameter in phase space (radial velocity) is also measured thanks to medium-resolution spectroscopy being obtained for the 150 million brightest stars. During the commissioning phase, two fields, one around each ecliptic pole, have been repeatedly observed to assess and to improve the overall satellite performances as well as the associated reduction and analysis software. A ground-based photometric and spectroscopic survey was therefore initiated in 2007, and is still running in order to gather as much information as possible about the stars in these fields. This work is of particular interest to the validation of the Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) outputs. The paper presents the radial velocity measurements performed for the Southern targets in the 12 - 17 R magnitude range on high- to mid-resolution spectra obtained with the GIRAFFE and UVES spectrographs.
  • Aims. We obtained Herschel/PACS imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebula surrounding the candidate LBV HD168625. By combining these data with optical spectra of the star, we want to constrain the abundances in the nebula and in the star and compare them to trace back its evolution. Methods. We use CMFGEN to determine the fundamental parameters and the CNO abundances of the central star whilst the abundances of the nebula are derived from the emission lines present in the Herschel/PACS spectrum. Result. The FIR images show a nebula composed of an elliptical ring/torus of ejecta with a ESE-WNW axis and of a second perpendicular bipolar structure composed of empty caps/rings. We detect equatorial shells composed of dust and ionized material with different sizes when observed at different wavelengths, and bipolar caps more of less separated from the central star in H$\alpha$ and mid-IR images. This complex global structure seems to show 2 different inclinations: 40{\deg} for the equatorial torus and 60{\deg} for the bipolar ejections. From the Herschel/PACS spectrum, we determine nebular abundances of $\mathrm{N/H} = 4.1 \pm 0.8 \times~10^{-4}$ and $\mathrm{C/H} \sim 1.6_{-0.35}^{+1.16} \times~10^{-4}$, as well as a mass of ionized gas of $0.17\pm 0.04$M$_{\odot}$ and a neutral hydrogen mass of about $1.0\pm 0.3$M$_{\odot}$ which dominates. Analysis of the central star reveals Teff = 14000K, log g = 1.74 and log (L/L$_{\odot}$) = 5.58. We derive stellar abundances of about $\mathrm{N/H} = 5.0 \pm 1.5 \times~10^{-4}$, $\mathrm{C/H} = 1.4 \pm 0.5 \times~10^{-4}$ and $\mathrm{O/H} = 3.5 \pm 1.0\times~10^{-4}$. All these measurements taken together are compatible with the evolutionary tracks of a star with an initial mass between $28$ and $33$M$_{\odot}$ and with a crit. rotational rate between 0.3 and 0.4 that has lost its material during or just after the BSG phase.
  • We aim to constrain the temperature and velocity structures, and H2O abundances in the winds of a sample of M-type AGB stars. We further aim to determine the effect of H2O line cooling on the energy balance in the inner circumstellar envelope. We use two radiative-transfer codes to model molecular emission lines of CO and H2O towards four M-type AGB stars. We focus on spectrally resolved observations of CO and H2O from HIFI. The observations are complemented by ground-based CO observations, and spectrally unresolved CO and H2O observations with PAC. The observed line profiles constrain the velocity structure throughout the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs), while the CO intensities constrain the temperature structure in the CSEs. The H2O observations constrain the o-H2O and p-H2O abundances relative to H2. Finally, the radiative-transfer modelling allows to solve the energy balance in the CSE, in principle including also H2O line cooling. The fits to the line profiles only set moderate constraints on the velocity profile, indicating shallower acceleration profiles in the winds of M-type AGB stars than predicted by dynamical models, while the CO observations effectively constrain the temperature structure. Including H2O line cooling in the energy balance was only possible for the low-mass-loss-rate objects in the sample, and required an ad hoc adjustment of the dust velocity profile in order to counteract extreme cooling in the inner CSE. H2O line cooling was therefore excluded from the models. The constraints set on the temperature profile by the CO lines nevertheless allowed us to derive H2O abundances. The derived H2O abundances confirm previous estimates and are consistent with chemical models. However, the uncertainties in the derived abundances are relatively large, in particular for p-H2O, and consequently the derived o/p-H2O ratios are not well constrained.
  • The young star beta Pictoris is well known for its dusty debris disk, produced through the grinding down by collisions of planetesimals, kilometre-sized bodies in orbit around the star. In addition to dust, small amounts of gas are also known to orbit the star, likely the result from vaporisation of violently colliding dust grains. The disk is seen edge on and from previous absorption spectroscopy we know that the gas is very rich in carbon relative to other elements. The oxygen content has been more difficult to assess, however, with early estimates finding very little oxygen in the gas at a C/O ratio 20x higher than the cosmic value. A C/O ratio that high is difficult to explain and would have far-reaching consequences for planet formation. Here we report on observations by the far-infrared space telescope Herschel, using PACS, of emission lines from ionised carbon and neutral oxygen. The detected emission from C+ is consistent with that previously reported being observed by the HIFI instrument on Herschel, while the emission from O is hard to explain without assuming a higher-density region in the disk, perhaps in the shape of a clump or a dense torus, required to sufficiently excite the O atoms. A possible scenario is that the C/O gas is produced by the same process responsible for the CO clump recently observed by ALMA in the disk, and that the re-distribution of the gas takes longer than previously assumed. A more detailed estimate of the C/O ratio and the mass of O will have to await better constraints on the C/O gas spatial distribution.
  • Infrared Herschel imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebula M1-67 around the Wolf-Rayet star WR 124 have been obtained along with optical imaging observations. The infrared images reveal a clumpy dusty nebula that extends up to 1 pc. The comparison with the optical images shows that the ionized gas nebula coincides with the dust nebula, the dust and the gas being mixed together. A photodissociation region is revealed from the infrared spectroscopic analysis. The analysis of the infrared spectrum of the nebula, where forbidden emission lines of ionized elements were detected, showed that the nebula consists of mildly processed material with the calculated abundance number ratios being N/O = 1.0 +/- 0.5 and C/O = 0.46 +/- 0.27. Based on a radiative transfer model, the dust mass of the nebula was estimated to be 0.22 Msun with a population of large grains being necessary to reproduce the observations. The comparison of the mass-loss rate and the abundance ratios to theoretical models of stellar evolution led to the conclusion that the nebular ejection took place during a RSG/YSG evolutionary phase of a central star with an initial mass of 32 Msun.
  • Context. The recent detection of warm H$_2$O vapor emission from the outflows of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars challenges the current understanding of circumstellar chemistry. Two mechanisms have been invoked to explain warm H$_2$O vapor formation. In the first, periodic shocks passing through the medium immediately above the stellar surface lead to H$_2$O formation. In the second, penetration of ultraviolet interstellar radiation through a clumpy circumstellar medium leads to the formation of H$_2$O molecules in the intermediate wind. Aims. We aim to determine the properties of H$_2$O emission for a sample of 18 carbon-rich AGB stars and subsequently constrain which of the above mechanisms provides the most likely warm H$_2$O formation pathway. Methods, Results, and Conclusions. See paper.
  • Aim: The late stages of stellar evolution are mainly governed by the mass of the stars. Low- and intermediate-mass stars lose copious amounts of mass during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) which obscure the central star making it difficult to study the stellar spectra and determine the stellar mass. In this study, we present observational data that can be used to determine lower limits to the stellar mass. Method: Spectra of nine heavily reddened AGB stars taken by the Herschel Space Observatory display numerous molecular emission lines. The strongest emission lines are due to H2O. We search for the presence of isotopologues of H2O in these objects. Result: We detected the 16O and 17O isotopologues of water in these stars, but lines due to H2^{18}O are absent. The lack of 18O is predicted by a scenario where the star has undergone hot-bottom burning which preferentially destroys 18O relative to 16O and 17O. From stellar evolution calculations, this process is thought to occur when the stellar mass is above 5 Msun for solar metallicity. Hence, observations of different isotopologues of H2O can be used to help determine the lower limit to the initial stellar mass. Conclusion: From our observations, we deduce that these extreme OH/IR stars are intermediate-mass stars with masses of >= 5 Msun. Their high mass-loss rates of ~ 1.0e-4 Msun/yr may affect the enrichment of the interstellar medium and the overall chemical evolution of our Galaxy.
  • Context: AGB stars lose a large percentage of their mass in a dust-driven wind. This creates a circumstellar envelope, which can be studied through thermal dust emission and molecular emission lines. In the case of high mass-loss rates, this study is complicated by the high optical depths and the intricate coupling between gas and dust radiative transfer characteristics. An important aspect of the physics of gas-dust interactions is the strong influence of dust on the excitation of several molecules, including H2O. Aims: The dust and gas content of the envelope surrounding the high mass-loss rate OH/IR star OH 127.8+0.0, as traced by Herschel observations, is studied, with a focus on the H2O content and the dust-to-gas ratio. We report detecting a large number of H2O vapor emission lines up to J = 9 in the Herschel data, for which we present the measured line strengths. Methods: The treatments of both gas and dust species are combined using two numerical radiative transfer codes. The method is illustrated for both low and high mass-loss-rate sources. Specifically, we discuss different ways of assessing the dust-to-gas ratio: 1) from the dust thermal emission spectrum and the CO molecular gas line strengths; 2) from the momentum transfer from dust to gas and the measured gas terminal velocity; and 3) from the determination of the required amount of dust to reproduce H2O lines for a given H2O vapor abundance. These three diagnostics probe different zones of the outflow, for the first time allowing an investigation of a possible radial dependence of the dust-to-gas ratio. Results: ... Continued in article.
  • Far-infrared Herschel PACS imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebula around the luminous blue variable (LBV) star AG Car have been obtained along with optical imaging in the Halpha+[NII] filter. In the infrared light, the nebula appears as a clumpy ring shell that extends up to 1.2 pc with an inner radius of 0.4 pc. It coincides with the Halpha nebula, but extends further out. Dust modeling of the nebula was performed and indicates the presence of large grains. The dust mass is estimated to be ~ 0.2 Msun. The infrared spectrum of the nebula consists of forbidden emission lines over a dust continuum. Apart from ionized gas, these lines also indicate the existence of neutral gas in a photodissociation region that surrounds the ionized region. The abundance ratios point towards enrichment by processed material. The total mass of the nebula ejected from the central star amounts to ~ 15 Msun, assuming a dust-to-gas ratio typical of LBVs. The abundances and the mass-loss rate were used to constrain the evolutionary path of the central star and the epoch at which the nebula was ejected, with the help of available evolutionary models. This suggests an ejection during a cool LBV phase for a star of ~ 55 Msun with little rotation.
  • The evolution of low- and intermediate-mass stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) is mainly controlled by the rate at which these stars lose mass in a stellar wind. Understanding the driving mechanism and strength of the stellar winds of AGB stars and the processes enriching their surfaces with products of nucleosynthesis are paramount to constraining AGB evolution and predicting the chemical evolution of galaxies. In a previous paper we have constrained the structure of the outflowing envelope of W Hya using spectral lines of the $^{12}$CO molecule. Here we broaden this study by modelling an extensive set of H$_{2}$O and $^{28}$SiO lines observed by the three instruments on board Herschel using a state-of-the-art molecular excitation and radiative transfer code. The oxygen isotopic ratios and the $^{28}$SiO abundance profile can be connected to the initial stellar mass and to crucial aspects of dust formation at the base of the stellar wind, respectively. The modelling of H$_{2}$O and $^{28}$SiO confirms the properties of the envelope model of W Hya derived from $^{12}$CO lines. We find an H$_2$O ortho-to-para ratio of 2.5\,$^{+2.5}_{-1.0}$, consistent with what is expected for an AGB wind. The O$^{16}$/O$^{17}$ ratio indicates that W Hya has an initial mass of about 1.5 M$_\odot$. Although the ortho- and para-H$_{2}$O lines observed by HIFI appear to trace gas of slightly different physical properties, a turbulence velocity of $0.7\pm0.1$ km s$^{-1}$ fits the HIFI lines of both spin isomers and those of $^{28}$SiO well. The ortho- and para-H$_2^{16}$O and $^{28}$SiO abundances relative to H$_{2}$ are $(6^{+3}_{-2}) \times 10^{-4}$, $(3^{+2}_{-1}) \times 10^{-4}$, and $(3.3\pm 0.8)\times 10^{-5}$, respectively. Assuming a solar silicon-to-carbon ratio, the $^{28}$SiO line emission model is consistent with about one-third of the silicon atoms being locked up in dust particles.
  • S-type AGB stars have a C/O ratio which suggests that they are transition objects between oxygen-rich M-type stars and carbon-rich C-type stars. As such, their circumstellar compositions of gas and dust are thought to be sensitive to their precise C/O ratio, and it is therefore of particular interest to examine their circumstellar properties. We present new Herschel HIFI and PACS sub-millimetre and far-infrared line observations of several molecular species towards the S-type AGB star W Aql. We use these observations, which probe a wide range of gas temperatures, to constrain the circumstellar properties of W Aql, including mass-loss rate and molecular abundances. We used radiative transfer codes to model the circumstellar dust and molecular line emission to determine circumstellar properties and molecular abundances. We assumed a spherically symmetric envelope formed by a constant mass-loss rate driven by an accelerating wind. Our model includes fully integrated H2O line cooling as part of the solution of the energy balance. We detect circumstellar molecular lines from CO, H2O, SiO, HCN, and, for the first time in an S-type AGB star, NH3. The radiative transfer calculations result in an estimated mass-loss rate for W Aql of 4.0e-6 Msol yr-1 based on the 12CO lines. The estimated 12CO/13CO ratio is 29, which is in line with ratios previously derived for S-type AGB stars. We find an H2O abundance of 1.5e-5, which is intermediate to the abundances expected for M and C stars, and an ortho/para ratio for H2O that is consistent with formation at warm temperatures. We find an HCN abundance of 3e-6, and, although no CN lines are detected using HIFI, we are able to put some constraints on the abundance, 6e-6, and distribution of CN in W Aql's circumstellar envelope using ground-based data. We find an SiO abundance of 3e-6, and an NH3 abundance of 1.7e-5, confined to a small envelope.
  • The Helix Nebula (NGC 7293) is the closest planetary nebulae. Therefore, it is an ideal template for photochemical studies at small spatial scales in planetary nebulae. We aim to study the spatial distribution of the atomic and the molecular gas, and the structure of the photodissociation region along the western rims of the Helix Nebula as seen in the submillimeter range with Herschel. We use 5 SPIRE FTS pointing observations to make atomic and molecular spectral maps. We analyze the molecular gas by modeling the CO rotational lines using a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative transfer model. For the first time, we have detected extended OH+ emission in a planetary nebula. The spectra towards the Helix Nebula also show CO emission lines (from J= 4 to 8), [NII] at 1461 GHz from ionized gas, and [CI] (2-1), which together with the OH+ lines, trace extended CO photodissociation regions along the rims. The estimated OH+ column density is (1-10)x1e12 cm-2. The CH+ (1-0) line was not detected at the sensitivity of our observations. Non-LTE models of the CO excitation were used to constrain the average gas density (n(H2)=(1-5)x1e5 cm-3) and the gas temperature (Tk= 20-40 K). The SPIRE spectral-maps suggest that CO arises from dense and shielded clumps in the western rims of the Helix Nebula whereas OH+ and [CI] lines trace the diffuse gas and the UV and X-ray illuminated clumps surface where molecules reform after CO photodissociation. [NII] traces a more diffuse ionized gas component in the interclump medium.
  • We present 48 Herschel/PACS spectra of evolved stars in the wavelength range of 67-72 $\mu$m. This wavelength range covers the 69 $\mu$m band of crystalline olivine ($\text{Mg}_{2-2x}\text{Fe}_{(2x)}\text{SiO}_{4}$). The width and wavelength position of this band are sensitive to the temperature and composition of the crystalline olivine. Our sample covers a wide range of objects: from high mass-loss rate AGB stars (OH/IR stars, $\dot M \ge 10^{-5}$ M$_\odot$/yr), through post-AGB stars with and without circumbinary disks, to planetary nebulae and even a few massive evolved stars. The goal of this study is to exploit the spectral properties of the 69 $\mu$m band to determine the composition and temperature of the crystalline olivine. Since the objects cover a range of evolutionary phases, we study the physical and chemical properties in this range of physical environments. We fit the 69 $\mu$m band and use its width and position to probe the composition and temperature of the crystalline olivine. For 27 sources in the sample, we detected the 69 $\mu$m band of crystalline olivine ($\text{Mg}_{(2-2x)}\text{Fe}_{(2x)}\text{SiO}_{4}$). The 69 $\mu$m band shows that all the sources produce pure forsterite grains containing no iron in their lattice structure. The temperature of the crystalline olivine as indicated by the 69 $\mu$m band, shows that on average the temperature of the crystalline olivine is highest in the group of OH/IR stars and the post-AGB stars with confirmed Keplerian disks. The temperature is lower for the other post-AGB stars and lowest for the planetary nebulae. A couple of the detected 69 $\mu$m bands are broader than those of pure magnesium-rich crystalline olivine, which we show can be due to a temperature gradient in the circumstellar environment of these stars. continued...
  • Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars lose their envelopes by means of a stellar wind whose driving mechanism is not understood well. Characterizing the composition and thermal and dynamical structure of the outflow provides constraints that are essential for understanding AGB evolution, including the rate of mass loss and isotopic ratios. We modeled the CO emission from the wind of the low mass-loss rate oxygen-rich AGB star W Hya using data obtained by the HIFI, PACS, and SPIRE instruments onboard the Herschel Space Observatory and ground-based telescopes. $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO lines are used to constrain the intrinsic $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C ratio from resolved HIFI lines. The acceleration of the outflow up to about 5.5 km/s is quite slow and can be represented by a beta-type velocity law with index 5. Beyond this point, acceleration up the terminal velocity of 7 km/s is faster. Using the J=10-9, 9-8, and 6-5 transitions, we find an intrinsic $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C ratio of $18\pm10$ for W Hya, where the error bar is mostly due to uncertainties in the $^{12}$CO abundance and the stellar flux around 4.6 $\mu$m. To match the low-excitation CO lines, these molecules need to be photo-dissociated at about 500 stellar radii. The radial dust emission intensity profile measured by PACS images at 70 $\mu$m shows substantially stronger emission than our model predicts beyond 20 arcsec. The initial slow acceleration of the wind implies inefficient wind driving in the lower part of the envelope. The final injection of momentum in the wind might be the result of an increase in the opacity thanks to the late condensation of dust species. The derived intrinsic isotopologue ratio for W Hya is consistent with values set by the first dredge-up and suggestive of an initial mass of 2 M$_\odot$ or more. However, the uncertainty in the main-sequence mass derived based on this isotopologic ratio is large.
  • We present here an original process combining top-down and bottom-up approaches by annealing a thin gold film evaporated onto a hole template made by etching a PS-PMMA copolymer film. Such process allows a better control of the gold nanoparticle size distribution which provides a sharper localized surface plasmon resonance. This makes such route appealing for sensing applications since the figure of merit of the Au nanoparticles obtained after thermal evaporation is more than doubled. Such process could besides allow tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance by using copolymer with various molecular weights and thus be attractive for surface enhanced raman spectroscopy.
  • We report spectroscopic and imaging observations of rotational transitions of cold CO and SiO in the ejecta of SN1987A, the first such emission detected in a supernova remnant. In addition to line luminosities for the CO J=1-0, 2-1, 6-5, and 7-6 transitions, we present upper limits for all other transitions up to J=13-12, collectively measured from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX), and the Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE). Simple models show the lines are emitted from at least 0.01 solar masses of CO at a temperature > 14 K, confined within at most 35% of a spherical volume expanding at ~ 2000 km/s. Moreover, we locate the emission within 1'' of the central debris. These observations, along with a partial observation of SiO, confirm the presence of cold molecular gas within supernova remnants and provide insight into the physical conditions and chemical processes in the ejecta. Furthermore, we demonstrate the powerful new window into supernova ejecta offered by submillimeter observations.
  • We have obtained far-infrared Herschel PACS imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebular environment of the luminous blue variable WRAY 15-751. These images clearly show that the main, dusty nebula is a shell of radius 0.5 pc and width 0.35 pc extending outside the H-alpha nebula. They also reveal a second, bigger and fainter dust nebula, observed for the first time. Both nebulae lie in an empty cavity, likely the remnant of the O-star wind bubble formed when the star was on the main sequence. The kinematic ages of the nebulae are about 20000 and 80000 years and each nebula contains about 0.05 Msun of dust. Modeling of the inner nebula indicates a Fe-rich dust. The far-infrared spectrum of the main nebula revealed forbidden emission lines coming from ionized and neutral gas. Our study shows that the main nebula consists of a shell of ionized gas surrounded by a thin photodissociation region illuminated by an "average" early-B star. The derived abundance ratios N/O=1.0+/-0.4 and C/O=0.4+/-0.2 indicate a mild N/O enrichment. We estimate that the inner shell contains 1.7+/-0.6 Msun of gas. Assuming a similar dust-to-gas ratio for the outer nebula, the total mass ejected by WRAY 15-751 amounts to 4+/-2 Msun. The measured abundances, masses and kinematic ages of the nebulae were used to constrain the evolution of the star and the epoch at which the nebulae were ejected. Our results point to an ejection of the nebulae during the RSG evolutionary phase of an ~ 40 Msun star. The presence of multiple shells around the star suggests that the mass-loss was not a continuous ejection but rather a series of episodes of extreme mass-loss. Our measurements are compatible with the recent evolutionary tracks computed for an 40 Msun star with little rotation. They support the O-BSG-RSG-YSG-LBV filiation and the idea that high-luminosity and low-luminosity LBVs follow different evolutionary paths.
  • We report on the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS) of ChaII, focusing on the detection of Class I to III young stellar objects (YSOs). We aim at characterizing the circumstellar material around these YSOs and understanding which disk parameters are most likely constrained by the new HGBS data. We recovered 29 out of the 63 known YSOs in ChaII with a detection in at least one of the PACS/SPIRE pass-bands: 3 Class I YSOs (i.e.,100%), 1 Flat source (i.e., 50%), 21 Class II objects (i.e., 55%), 3 Class III objects (i.e, 16%) and the unclassified source IRAS 12522-7640. We explore PACS/SPIRE colors of this sample and present modeling of their SEDs using the RADMC-2D radiative transfer code. We find that YSO colors are confined in specific regions of PACS/SPIRE color-color diagrams. These color ranges are expected to be only marginally contaminated by extragalactic sources and field stars and, hence, provide a useful YSO selection tool when applied altogether. We were able to model the SED of 26 out of the 29 detected YSOs. We discuss the degeneracy/limitations of our SED fitting results and adopt the Bayesian method to estimate the probability of different values for the derived disk parameters. The Cha II YSOs present typical disk inner radii around 0.1 AU. The lower limit to Rc is typically around 50 AU. The lower limits to Mdisk are proportional to the stellar masses with a typical 0.3% ratio, i.e., in the range estimated in the literature for young Class II stars and brown dwarfs across a broad range of stellar masses. The estimated flaring angles, although very uncertain, point towards rather flat disks (1+phi less than 1.2), as found for low-mass M-type YSO samples in other star forming regions. Thus, our results support the idea that disk properties show a dependence on stellar properties.
  • Context. The interaction between stellar winds and the interstellar medium (ISM) can create complex bow shocks. The photometers on board the Herschel Space Observatory are ideally suited to studying the morphologies of these bow shocks. Aims. We aim to study the circumstellar environment and wind-ISM interaction of the nearest red supergiant, Betelgeuse. Methods. Herschel PACS images at 70, 100, and 160 micron and SPIRE images at 250, 350, and 500 micron were obtained by scanning the region around Betelgeuse. These data were complemented with ultraviolet GALEX data, near-infrared WISE data, and radio 21 cm GALFA-HI data. The observational properties of the bow shock structure were deduced from the data and compared with hydrodynamical simulations. Results. The infrared Herschel images of the environment around Betelgeuse are spectacular, showing the occurrence of multiple arcs at 6-7 arcmin from the central target and the presence of a linear bar at 9 arcmin. Remarkably, no large-scale instabilities are seen in the outer arcs and linear bar. The dust temperature in the outer arcs varies between 40 and 140 K, with the linear bar having the same colour temperature as the arcs. The inner envelope shows clear evidence of a non-homogeneous clumpy structure (beyond 15 arcsec), probably related to the giant convection cells of the outer atmosphere. The non-homogeneous distribution of the material even persists until the collision with the ISM. A strong variation in brightness of the inner clumps at a radius of 2 arcmin suggests a drastic change in mean gas and dust density some 32 000 yr ago. Using hydrodynamical simulations, we try to explain the observed morphology of the bow shock around Betelgeuse. Conclusions: [abbreviated]
  • We investigate the effect of the "high-pass filter" data reduction technique on the Herschel PACS PSF and noise of the PACS maps at the 70, 100 and 160 um bands and in medium and fast scan speeds. This branch of the PACS Photometer pipeline is the most used for cosmological observations and for point-source observations.The calibration of the flux loss due to the median removal applied by the PACS pipeline (high-pass filter) is done via dedicated simulations obtained by "polluting" real PACS timelines with fake sources at different flux levels. The effect of the data reduction parameter settings on the final map noise is done by using selected observations of blank fields with high data redundancy. We show that the running median removal can cause significant flux losses at any flux level. We analyse the advantages and disadvantages of several masking strategies and suggest that a mask based on putting circular patches on prior positions is the best solution to reduce the amount of flux loss. We provide a calibration of the point-source flux loss for several masking strategies in a large range of data reduction parameters, and as a function of the source flux. We also show that, for stacking analysis, the impact of the high-pass filtering effect is to reduce significantly the clustering effect. The analysis of the global noise and noise components of the PACS maps shows that the dominant parameter in determining the final noise is the high-pass filter width. We also provide simple fitting functions to build the error map from the coverage map and to estimate the cross-correlation correction factor in a representative portion of the data reduction parameter space.
  • Some planetary systems harbour debris disks containing planetesimals such as asteroids and comets. Collisions between such bodies produce small dust particles, the spectral features of which reveal their composition and, hence, that of their parent bodies. A measurement of the composition of olivine crystals has been done for the protoplanetary disk HD100546 and for olivine crystals in the warm inner parts of planetary systems. The latter compares well with the iron-rich olivine in asteroids (x<0.29). In the cold outskirts of the Beta Pictoris system, an analogue to the young Solar System, olivine crystals were detected but their composition remained undetermined, leaving unknown how the composition of the bulk of Solar System cometary olivine grains compares with that of extrasolar comets. Here we report the detection of the 69-micrometre-wavelength band of olivine crystals in the spectrum of Beta Pictoris. Because the disk is optically thin, we can associate the crystals with an extrasolar proto-Kuiper belt a distance of 15-45 astronomical units from the star (one astronomical unit is the Sun-Earth distance), determine their magnesium-rich composition (x=0.01+/-0.001) and show that they make up 3.6+/-1.0 per cent of the total dust mass. These values are strikingly similar to those for the dust emitted by the most primitive comets in the Solar System, even though Beta Pictoris is more massive and more luminous and has a different planetary system architecture.
  • Context: Observations of transitional disks give us an understanding of the formation of planets and planetary systems such as our own. But care must be taken in the identification of such sources: the higher spatial resolution of the Herschel Space Observatory provides a new view on the origin of the far-infrared and sub-millimeter excesses observed. Aims: We review the nature of previously known transitional disks in the Chamaeleon I star-forming region with Herschel data. Methods: We analyze Herschel PACS and SPIRE images of the young star T54 together with ancillary images. We also analyze its spectral energy distribution and indications from optical and mid-infrared spectroscopy. Results: We detect extended emission in the PACS 70 \mu m image ~6" off source at a position angle of 196{\deg} from T54. The emission detected at longer wavelength (PACS 100, 160, SPIRE 250 and 350 \mu m) is also offset from the position of the star. This suggests that the excess observed in the far-infrared part of the SED is not fully associated with T54. Conclusions: Herschel images show that the far-infrared excess seen in T54 is not due to a transitional disk but to extended emission south-west of the source. The object still shows point-like and now downscaled excess at mid-infrared wavelengths, but its origin cannot be constrained without higher spatial resolution data. However, different indications point towards an evolved disk or extended unresolved emission close to the source.
  • We present new Herschel/PACS images at 70, 100, and 160 micron of the well-known, nearby, carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch star IRC+10216 revealing multiple dust shells in its circumstellar envelope. For the first time, dust shells (or arcs) are detected until 320 arcsec. The almost spherical shells are non-concentric and have an angular extent between 40 deg and 200 deg. The shells have a typical width of 5 arcsec - 8 arcsec, and the shell separation varies in the range of 10 arcsec - 35 arcsec, corresponding to 500-1700 yr. Local density variations within one arc are visible. The shell/intershell density contrast is typically 4, and the arcs contain some 50% more dust mass than the smooth envelope. The observed (nested) arcs record the mass-loss history over the past 16 000 yr, but Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the turbulent astropause and astrosheath will erase any signature of the mass-loss history for at least the first 200 000 yr of mass loss. Accounting for the bowshock structure, the envelope mass around IRC+10216 contains >2Msun of gas and dust mass. It is argued that the origin of the shells is related to non-isotropic mass-loss events and clumpy dust formation.