• Two years ago, the AMS collaboration released the most precise measurement of the cosmic ray positron flux. It confirms that pure secondary predictions fall below the data above 10 GeV, suggesting the presence of a primary component, e.g. annihilations of WIMPs dark matter. Most analyses have focused on the high-energy part of the spectrum, disregarding the GeV energy region where cosmic ray transport is harder to model and solar modulation comes into play. Given the high quality of AMS measurements, it is timely to re-examine the positron anomaly over the entire energy range, taking into account transport processes so far neglected, e.g. convection or diffusive re-acceleration. We devise a new semi-analytical method to take into account transport processes so far neglected, but important below a few GeV. It is based on the pinching of inverse Compton and synchrotron energy losses inside the Galactic disc. It allows to carry out extensive scans over the cosmic ray propagation parameters, which we strongly constrain by requiring that the secondary component does not overshoot the AMS measurements. Only models with large diffusion coefficients survive this test. The positron flux is a powerful and independent probe of cosmic ray propagation, complementary to the boron-to-carbon ratio. We then scan over WIMP mass to fit the annihilation cross section and branching ratios, exploring both direct annihilations into standard model particles or through light mediators. In the former case, the best fit yields a $p$-value of 0.4% for a mass of 264 GeV, a value that does not allow to reproduce the highest energy data points. Worse quality fits are found in the latter case. The interpretation of the positron excess in terms of single DM species annihilations is strongly disfavored. This conclusion is based solely on the positron data, and no other observation needs to be invoked.
  • A hardening of the proton and helium fluxes is observed above a few hundreds of GeV/nuc. The distribution of local sources of primary cosmic rays has been suggested as a potential solution to this puzzling behavior. Some authors even claim that a single source is responsible for the observed anomalies. But how probable these explanations are? To answer that question, our current description of cosmic ray Galactic propagation needs to be replaced by the Myriad model. In the former approach, sources of protons and helium nuclei are treated as a jelly continuously spread over space and time. A more accurate description is provided by the Myriad model where sources are considered as point-like events. This leads to a probabilistic derivation of the fluxes of primary species, and opens the possibility that larger-than-average values may be observed at the Earth. For a long time though, a major obstacle has been the infinite variance associated to the probability distribution function which the fluxes follow. Several suggestions have been made to cure this problem but none is entirely satisfactory. We go a step further here and solve the infinite variance problem of the Myriad model by making use of the generalized central limit theorem. We find that primary fluxes are distributed according to a stable law with heavy tail, well-known to financial analysts. The probability that the proton and helium anomalies are sourced by local SNR can then be calculated. The p-values associated to the CREAM measurements turn out to be small, unless somewhat unrealistic propagation parameters are assumed.
  • Recent years have seen increased theoretical and experimental effort towards the first-ever detection of cosmic-ray antideuterons, in particular as an indirect signature of dark matter annihilation or decay. In contrast to indirect dark matter searches using positrons, antiprotons, or gamma-rays, which suffer from relatively high and uncertain astrophysical backgrounds, searches with antideuterons benefit from very suppressed conventional backgrounds, offering a potential breakthrough in unexplored phase space for dark matter. This article is based on the first dedicated cosmic-ray antideuteron workshop, which was held at UCLA in June 2014. It reviews broad classes of dark matter candidates that result in detectable cosmic-ray antideuteron fluxes, as well as the status and prospects of current experimental searches. The coalescence model of antideuteron production and the influence of antideuteron measurements at particle colliders are discussed. This is followed by a review of the modeling of antideuteron propagation through the magnetic fields, plasma currents, and molecular material of our Galaxy, the solar system, the Earth's geomagnetic field, and the atmosphere. Finally, the three ongoing or planned experiments that are sensitive to cosmic-ray antideuterons, BESS, AMS-02, and GAPS, are detailed. As cosmic-ray antideuteron detection is a rare event search, multiple experiments with orthogonal techniques and backgrounds are essential. Many theoretical and experimental groups have contributed to these studies over the last decade, this review aims to provide the first coherent discussion of the relevant dark matter theories that antideuterons probe, the challenges to predictions and interpretations of antideuteron signals, and the experimental efforts toward cosmic antideuteron detection.
  • PAMELA and, more recently, AMS-02, are ushering us into a new era of greatly reduced statistical uncertainties in experimental measurements of cosmic-ray fluxes. In particular, new determinations of traditional diagnostic tools such as the boron-to-carbon ratio (B/C) are expected to significantly reduce errors on cosmic-ray diffusion parameters, with important implications for astroparticle physics, ranging from inferring primary source spectra to indirect dark matter searches. It is timely to stress, however, that the conclusions obtained crucially depend on the framework in which the data are interpreted as well as from some nuclear input parameters. We aim at assessing the theoretical uncertainties affecting the outcome, with models as simple as possible while still retaining the key dependencies. We compare different semi-analytical, two-zone model descriptions of cosmic-ray transport in the Galaxy. We test for the effect of a primary source contamination in the boron flux by parametrically altering its flux, as well as for nuclear cross section uncertainties. Our study on preliminary results from AMS-02 suggests that, differently for instance from the leptonic case, realistic modelling of the geometry of the Galaxy and of the source distribution are of minor importance to correctly reproduce B/C data at high energies and thus, to a large extent, for the extraction of diffusion parameters. The Ansatz on the lack of primary injection of boron represents the most serious bias, and requires multi-messenger studies to be addressed. If this uncertainty could be lifted, nuclear uncertainties would still represent a serious concern, which degrade the systematic error on the inferred parameters to the 20% level, or three times the estimated experimental sensitivity. In order to reduce this, a new nuclear cross section measurement campaign is probably required.
  • The precise measurement of cosmic-ray antiparticles serves as important means for identifying the nature of dark matter. Recent years showed that identifying the nature of dark matter with cosmic-ray positrons and higher energy antiprotons is difficult, and has lead to a significantly increased interest in cosmic-ray antideuteron searches. Antideuterons may also be generated in dark matter annihilations or decays, offering a potential breakthrough in unexplored phase space for dark matter. Low-energy antideuterons are an important approach because the flux from dark matter interactions exceeds the background flux by more than two orders of magnitude in the low-energy range for a wide variety of models. This review is based on the "dbar14 - dedicated cosmic-ray antideuteron workshop", which brought together theorists and experimentalists in the field to discuss the current status, perspectives, and challenges for cosmic-ray antideuteron searches and discusses the motivation for antideuteron searches, the theoretical and experimental uncertainties of antideuteron production and propagation in our Galaxy, as well as give an experimental cosmic-ray antideuteron search status update. This report is a condensed summary of the article "Review of the theoretical and experimental status of dark matter identification with cosmic-ray antideuteron" (arXiv:1505.07785).
  • The positron fraction in cosmic rays was found to be a steadily increasing in function of energy, above $\sim$ 10 GeV. This behaviour contradicts standard astrophysical mechanisms, in which positrons are secondary particles, produced in the interactions of primary cosmic rays during the propagation in the interstellar medium. The observed anomaly in the positron fraction triggered a lot of excitement, as it could be interpreted as an indirect signature of the presence of dark matter species in the Galaxy. Alternatively, it could be produced by nearby astrophysical sources, such as pulsars. Both hypotheses are probed in this work in light of the latest AMS-02 positron fraction measurements. The transport of the primary and secondary positrons in the Galaxy is described using a semi-analytic two-zone model. MicrOMEGAs is used to model the positron flux generated by dark matter species. The description of the positron fraction from astrophysical sources is based on the pulsar observations included in the ATNF catalogue. We find that the mass of the favoured dark matter candidates is always larger than 500 GeV. The only dark matter species that fulfils the numerous gamma ray and cosmic microwave background bounds is a particle annihilating into four leptons through a light scalar or vector mediator, with a mixture of tau (75%) and electron (25%) channels, and a mass between 0.5 and 1 TeV. The positron anomaly can also be explained by a single astrophysical source and a list of five pulsars from the ATNF catalogue is given. Those results are obtained with the cosmic ray transport parameters that best fit the B/C ratio. Uncertainties in the propagation parameters turn out to be very significant. In the WIMP annihilation cross section to mass plane for instance, they overshadow the error contours derived from the positron data.
  • Measurements of cosmic ray fluxes by the PAMELA and CREAM experiments show unexpected spectral features between 200 GeV and 100 TeV. They could be due to the presence of nearby and young cosmic ray sources. This can be studied in the myriad model, in which cosmic rays diffuse from point-like instantaneous sources located randomly throughout the Galaxy. To test this hypothesis, one must compute the flux due to a catalog of local sources, but also the error bars associated to this quantity. This turns out not to be as straightforward as it seems, as the standard deviation is infinite when computed for the most general statistical ensemble. The goals of this paper are to provide a method to associate error bars to the flux measurements which has a clear statistical meaning, and to explore the relation between the myriad model and the more usual source model based on a continuous distribution. To this end, we show that the quantiles of the flux distribution are well-defined, even though the standard deviation is infinite. They can be used to compute 68% confidence levels, for instance. We also use the fact that local sources have known positions and ages to reduce the statistical ensemble from which random sources are drawn in the myriad model. We present a method to evaluate meaningful error bars for the flux obtained in the myriad model. In this context, we also discuss the status of the spectral features observed in the proton flux by CREAM and PAMELA.
  • G. Brooijmans, B. Gripaios, F. Moortgat, J. Santiago, P. Skands, D. Albornoz Vásquez, B. C. Allanach, A. Alloul, A. Arbey, A. Azatov, H. Baer, C. Balázs, A. Barr, L. Basso, M. Battaglia, P. Bechtle, G. Bélanger, A. Belyaev, K. Benslama, L. Bergström, A. Bharucha, C. Boehm, M. Bondarenko, O. Bondu, E. Boos, F. Boudjema, T. Bringmann, M. Brown, V. Bunichev, S. Calvet, M. Campanelli, A. Carmona, D. G. Cerdeño, M. Chala, R. S. Chivukula, D. Chowdhury, N. D. Christensen, M. Cirelli, S. Cox, K. Cranmer, J. Da Silva, T. Delahaye, A. De Roeck, A. Djouadi, E. Dobson, M. Dolan, F. Donato, G. Drieu La Rochelle, G. Duda, C. Duhr, B. Dumont, J. Edsjö, J. Ellis, C. Evoli, A. Falkowski, M. Felcini, B. Fuks, E. Gabrielli, D. Gaggero, S. Gascon-Shotkin, D. K. Ghosh, A. Giammanco, R. M. Godbole, P. Gondolo, T. Goto, D. Grasso, P. Gris, D. Guadagnoli, J. F. Gunion, U. Haisch, L. Hartgring, S. Heinemeyer, M. Hirsch, J. Hewett, A. Ismail, T. Jeltema, M. Kadastik, M. Kakizaki, K. Kannike, S. Khalil, J-L. Kneur, M. Krämer, S. Kraml, S. Kreiss, J. Lavalle, R. Leane, J. Lykken, L. Maccione, F. Mahmoudi, M. Mangano, S. P. Martin, D. Maurin, G. Moreau, S. Moretti, I. Moskalenko, G. Moultaka, M. Muhlleitner, I. Niessen, B. O'Leary, E. Orlando, P. Panci, G. Polesello, W. Porod, T. Porter, S. Profumo, H. Prosper, A. Pukhov, A. Racioppi, M. Raidal, M. Rausch de Traubenberg, A. Renaud, J. Reuter, T. G. Rizzo, T. Robens, A. Y. Rodríguez-Marrero, P. Salati, C. Savage, P. Scott, S. Sekmen, A. Semenov, C.-L. Shan, C. Shepherd-Themistocleous, E. H. Simmons, P. Slavich, C. Speckner, F. Staub, A. Strong, R. Taillet, F. S. Thomas, M. C. Thomas, I. Tomalin, M. Tytgat, M. Ughetto, L. Valéry, D. G. E. Walker, A. Weiler, S. M. West, C. D. White, A. J. Williams, A. Wingerter, C. Wymant, J.-H. Yu, C.-P. Yuan, D. Zerwas
    April 20, 2012 hep-ph, hep-ex
    We present the activities of the "New Physics" working group for the "Physics at TeV Colliders" workshop (Les Houches, France, 30 May-17 June, 2011). Our report includes new agreements on formats for interfaces between computational tools, new tool developments, important signatures for searches at the LHC, recommendations for presentation of LHC search results, as well as additional phenomenological studies.
  • We present a new module of micrOMEGAs devoted to the computation of indirect signals from dark matter annihilation in any new model with a stable weakly interacting particle. The code provides the mass spectrum, cross-sections, relic density and exotic fluxes of gamma rays, positrons and antiprotons. The propagation of charged particles in the Galactic halo is handled with a new module that allows to easily modify the propagation parameters.
  • The indirect detection of particle dark matter (DM) is based on the search for anomalous components in cosmic rays (CRs) due to the annihilation of DM pairs in the galactic halo, on the top of the standard astrophysical production. These additional exotic components are potentially detectable at Earth as spectral distortions for the various cosmic radiations: $\chi + \chi \to q \bar{q}, W^+ W^-, ... \to \bar{p}, \bar{D}, e^+ \gamma and \nu's $. Detection of the DM annihilation products has motivated the spectacular development of several new experimental techniques. They range from detectors on ballons or in space for the study of antimatter and gamma-rays, to large area cosmic-ray and gamma-ray detecors on the ground to neutrino telescopes underground for the study of the neutrino component. In the following, we will discuss in detail the antimatter component of DM indirect searches, namely antiprotons, antideuterons, and positrons.
  • We first discuss the use of dimensional arguments (and of the quadrupolar emission hypothesis) in the derivation of the gravitational power radiated on a circular orbit. Then, we show how to simply obtain the instantaneous power radiated on a general Keplerian orbit by approximating it locally by a circle. This allows recovering with a good precision, in the case of an ellipse, the highly non trivial dependence on the eccentricity of the average power given by general relativity. The whole approach is understandable by undergraduate students.
  • A new calculation of the $\bar{p}/p$ ratio in cosmic rays is compared to the recent PAMELA data. The good match up to 100 GeV allows to set constraints on exotic contributions from thermal WIMP dark matter candidates. We derive stringent limits on possible enhancements of the WIMP \pbar flux: a $m_{\rm WIMP}$=100 GeV (1 TeV) signal cannot be increased by more than a factor 6 (40) without overrunning PAMELA data. Annihilation through the $W^+W^-$ channel is also inspected and cross-checked with $e^+/(e^-+e^+)$ data. This scenario is strongly disfavored as it fails to simultaneously reproduce positron and antiproton measurements.
  • The annihilation of dark matter (DM) in the Galaxy could produce specific imprints on the spectra of antimatter species in Galactic cosmic rays, which could be detected by upcoming experiments such as PAMELA and AMS02. Recent studies show that the presence of substructures can enhance the annihilation signal by a "boost factor" that not only depends on energy, but that is intrinsically a statistical property of the distribution of DM substructures inside the Milky Way. We investigate a scenario in which substructures consist of $\sim 100$ "mini-spikes" around intermediate-mass black holes. Focusing on primary positrons and antiprotons, we find large boost factors, up to a few thousand, that exhibit a large variance at high energy in the case of positrons and at low energy in the case of antiprotons. As a consequence, an estimate of the DM particle mass based on the observed cut-off in the positron spectrum could lead to a substantial underestimate of its actual value.
  • We compute the pair annihilation cross section of light (spin-0) dark matter particles into two photons and discuss the detectability of the monochromatic line associated with these annihilations.
  • In most cosmological models, primordial black holes (PBHs) should have formed in the early Universe. Their Hawking evaporation into particles could eventually lead to the formation of antideuterium nuclei. This paper is devoted to a first computation of this antideuteron flux. The production of these antinuclei is studied with a simple coalescence scheme, and their propagation in the Galaxy is treated with a well-constrained diffusion model. We compare the resulting primary flux to the secondary background, due to the spallation of protons on the interstellar matter. Antideuterons are shown to be a very sensitive probe for primordial black holes in our Galaxy. The next generation of experiments should allow investigators to significantly improve the current upper limit, nor even provide the first evidence of the existence of evaporating black holes.
  • It is widely believed that dark matter exists within galaxies and clusters of galaxies. Under the assumption that this dark matter is composed of the lightest, stable supersymmetric particle, assumed to be the neutralino, the feasibility of its indirect detection via observations of a diffuse gamma-ray signal due to neutralino annihilation within M31 is examined.
  • Primordial black holes (PBHs) have motivated many studies since it was shown that they should evaporate and produce all kinds of particles. Recent experimental measurements of cosmic rays with great accuracy, theoretical investigations on the possible formation mechanisms and detailed evaporation processes have revived the interest in such astrophysical objects. This article aims at using the latest developments on antiproton propagation models together with new data from BESS, CAPRICE and AMS experiments to constrain the local amount of PBH dark matter. Depending on the diffusion halo parameters and on the details of emission mechanism, we derive an average upper limit of the order of rho < 1.7E-33 g cm^-3.
  • Recent observations give some clues that the lenses discovered by the microlensing experiments in the direction of the Magellanic Clouds may be located in these satellite galaxies. We re-examine the possibility that self-lensing alone may account for the optical depth measured towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We present a self-consistent multi-component model of the LMC consisting of distinct stellar populations, each associated to a vertical velocity dispersion ranging from 10 to 60 km/s. The present work focuses on showing that such dispersions comply with current 20 - 30 km/s limits set by observation on specific LMC populations. We also show that this model reproduces both the 1-2 10^-7 observed optical depth and the event duration distribution.
  • We consider neutralino annihilation in dense extragalactic systems known to be dominated by dark matter, in particular M87 and several local dwarf spheroidal galaxies. These annihilations can produce energetic gamma rays which may be visible to atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes. We explore the supersymmetric parameter space, and compute the expected flux of gamma--rays coming from these objects. It is shown that some parts of the parameter space lead to a signal observable with the next generation of Cerenkov telescopes, provided the supersymmetric dark matter has a clumpy structure, as may be expected in a hierarchical scenario for structure formation.
  • The observed microlensing events towards the LMC do not have yet a coherent explanation. If they are due to Galactic Halo objects, the nature of these objects is puzzling --- half the halo in dark 0.5 Msol objects. On the other hand, traditional models of the LMC predict a self-lensing optical depth about an order of magnitude too low, although characteristics of some of the observed events favor a self-lensing explanation. We present here two models of the LMC taking into account the correlation between the mass of the stars and their velocity dispersion: a thin Mestel disk, and an ellipsoidal model. Both yield optical depths, event rates, and event duration distributions compatible with the observations. The grounds for such models are discussed, as well as their observational consequences.
  • The leaky box model is now ruled out by measurements of a cosmic ray gradient throughout the galactic disk. It needs to be replaced by a more refined treatment which takes into account the diffusion of cosmic rays in the magnetic fields of the Galaxy. We have estimated the flux of antiprotons on the Earth in the framework of a two-zone diffusion model. Those species are created by the spallation reactions of high-energy nuclei with the interstellar gas. Another potential source of antiprotons is the annihilation of supersymmetric particles in the dark halo that surrounds our Galaxy. In this letter, we investigate both processes. Special emphasis is given to the antiproton signature of supersymmetric dark matter. The corresponding signal exceeds the conventional spallation flux below 300 MeV, a domain that will be thoroughly explored by the Antimatter Spectrometer experiment. The propagation of the antiprotons produced in the remote regions of the halo back to the Earth plays a crucial role. Depending on the energy, the leaky box estimates are wrong by a factor varying from 0.5 up to 3.
  • By using both thermal field theory and a somewhat more intuitive method, we define the electric charge as well as the charge radius of neutrinos propagating inside a plasma. We show that electron neutrinos acquire a charge radius of order $\sim 6.5 \times 10^{-16}$ cm, regardless of the properties of the medium. Then, we compute the rate of plasmon decay which such an electric charge or a charge radius implies. Taking into account the relativistic effects of the degenerate electron gas, we compare our results to various approximations as well as to recent calculations and determine the regimes where the electric charge or the charge radius does mediate the decay of plasmons. Finally, we discuss the stellar limits on any anomalous charge radius of neutrinos.